15

This is the readline library’s prompt when you’re inputting a numeric argument. By typing AltShift@ on your keyboard, you’re apparently entering Alt2 which maps to M-2, which runs digit-argument in readline by default, and starts entering a numeric argument. If you then press Alt3 (which AltShift# maps to in your case) you’ll see the prompt change to (arg: ...


13

Yes, there are at least this four (five?) ways: AltGr Make your keyboard layout English (international AltGr dead keys). Then the right Alt key is the AltGr key. Pressing AltGr-m will generate a µ. Many other keys also generate other characters: AltGr-s for ß, and Shift-AltGr-s for §. There is a separate keyboard layout for the console (the true consoles ...


8

The default behavior of Ctrl+C is a combination of two things. The terminal driver¹ does not transmit this key press, but instead sends a SIGINT signal to the foreground process². By default, a process dies when it receives a SIGINT, but the process can set a signal handler, and then it'll run the signal handler when it receives SIGINT. There's no way to ...


5

It turns out that some keyboard shortcuts in Gnome do not show up in Settings → Devices → Keyboard → Keyboard Shortcuts. These "hidden" shortcuts are accessible by using the dconf-editor command. In the dconf editor, the Super+1 remapping was found at org/gnome/shell/keybindings/switch-to-application-1 while remappings for Super+2, Super+3, etc. were found ...


4

The address of the argument in the fourth column is passed to the function listed in the third column. For example, note how the zoom() function is listed twice under different arguments for different shortcuts. The Shortcut data type that makes up the shortcuts[] array in your question is defined in x.c as a struct of four members: typedef struct { ...


4

Screen rotation on/off. Some laptops support it much like tablets and phones.


4

If you enable your compose key, you can print this symbol with the compose/u sequence, like so: µ The full range of symbols available, and their respective key sequences, is documented on the Ubuntu wiki.


4

You're looking for Shift + K - :help K: Run a program to lookup the keyword under the cursor. The name of the program is given with the 'keywordprg' option (default is "man").


3

In recent versions of tmux (e.g. 2.6) the key Prefix-L is already bound to the command switch-client -l which as user47464 pointed out is probably what you want. You can check your bindings with Prefix-?: ... bind-key -T prefix L switch-client -l ...


3

The ksh shell has a default alias r that repeats the most recent command. It is bound to fc -s: alias r='fc -s' Interestingly, the bash documentation for the fc builtin (help fc, and also in the manual itself) even mentions this, but it's not a default alias in that shell: A useful alias to use with this is r='fc -s', so that typing r cc runs the ...


3

You can just undo, bound to Ctrl+_ in emacs mode by default (note that insert-last-word is also bound to Alt+_). After undoing though, if you invoke insert-last-word again, you'll be back to the beginning, you can't just alternate pressing Ctrl+_ and Alt+_ to go back and forth in the history. For that, you'd need to define a separate widget ...


3

They are also defined as global Konsole shortcuts to switch to the previous/next tab. Go to Konsole's Settings -> Configure Shortcuts and remove them there. (I performed this first, followed by the step you described. I also had to restart konsole for the changes to take effect; not sure if you'll need to restart too.)


3

Using input methods CIN-file input methods are usable in X11 and in my user-space virtual terminals. One of the commonly-collected ones, greek.cin, has the mu character. One simply enters m (lower case) and it is the only conversion. One can modify greek.cin to add micro, providing a second conversion, although visually it will be quite confusing, making ...


3

While my other answer will probably work on most Linuxes, even if they're many years old, SystemD and udev actually makes things easier: use lsusb to find the vendor and product code of your additional keyboard. (In my case, it's Vendor 145F, Product 0177. Make sure to have the letters in uppercase.) create a file /etc/udev/hwdb.d/90-extra-keyboard.hwdb, ...


3

To insert all but the first word of the previous history entry, you could define a custom widget like: insert-last-words() { emulate -L zsh set -o extendedglob if [[ $WIDGET = $LASTWIDGET ]]; then # subsequent invocations go further back in history like # insert-last-word zle undo # previous invocation ((INSERT_LAST_WORDS_INDEX += ${...


2

Seee https://askubuntu.com/a/1039039 One needs to run ibus-setup and in the tab "Emoji" change the shortcut (click on the three dots that are focused in the screenshot)


2

xkill is unable to run because the keyboard is still grabbed. bindsym --release $mod+Pause exec xkill should do the trick. From the i3 User's Guide: Some tools (such as import or xdotool) might be unable to run upon a KeyPress event, because the keyboard/pointer is still grabbed. For these situations, the --release flag can be used, which will execute ...


2

XFCE backlight buttons First, install xbacklight $ sudo apt install xbacklight Then, check whether you have control over the backlight. $ xbacklight -1 $ xbacklight +5 Should these commands result in a No outputs have backlight property error, then follow these remediating steps before proceeding. Once xbacklight -1 and xbacklight +1 work from the ...


2

The feature was added just one month ago (August 10, 2018) to evince1.  I guess it will be available in the next evince version 3.31.  The shortcuts in the addition are S to add text annotation and Ctrl+H to add highlight annotations. ______________ 1 See Merge Request “Allow Keybinding for highlighting annotation”.


2

There is also a setting for disabling this shortcut on Terminal Preferences -> Advanced:


2

You're looking for $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/xfce4/xfconf/xfce-perchannel-xml/xfce4-keyboard-shortcuts.xml Replace $XDG_CONFIG_HOME with ~/.config if you don't have it as an environment variable. You'll find the user configuration files for most XFCE4 applications in that $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/xfce4 folder, so you might want to simply copy that over for your DE ...


2

Xfce 4.12 does have lots of shortcuts devoted to moving windows across workspaces. There are shortcuts for moving a window to "previous workspace" and "next workspace", which correspond to left and right if your workspaces are in a row. These keys both move the window and change the focus to the new workspace. As is evident in the screenshot, there are no ...


2

Yes, but only with the cooperation of your terminal emulator. Terminal emulators send escape sequences (or in a few cases a single control character) to indicate the press of a function key. See the “terminal — input” section of How do keyboard input and text output work? for more details. You need to configure your terminal to send a unique escape sequence ...


2

You can't do that. When you pressed CTRL-L, bash didn't delete anything, it just sent an escape (clear = \e[H\e[2J) to putty to order it to clear the screen. While scouring putty's memory with a windows debugger and hoping that those precious bits weren't already overwritten may be possible, that task is quite involved and completely offtopic here.


2

ESC-. (insert-last-word) considers any space-separated or space-separable shell token¹ a “word“, including punctuation tokens such as &. You can give it a numeric argument to grab a word other than the last one. Positive arguments count from the right: Alt+1 Alt+. is equivalent to Alt+., Alt+2 Alt+. grabs the previous word, etc. Alt+0 Alt+. is the ...


2

Check to see if ~/.xbindkeysrc exists and has a reference to Ctrl+F. Key binds in that file are independent from the window manager and desktop environment, and will take precedence.


2

That's curious; it's the Right Alt which is AltGr and should generate such characters, but no file under /usr/share/X11/xkb seems to map AltGr+x to ø. I suspect that you're running emacs in a terminal emulator -- in which case you should let the terminal emulator map Alt to Esc instead; in xterm, you can do that with *.vt100.metaSendsEscape: true If you'...


2

Ah I've managed to work it out and since there are no other answers yet, I thought I might as well post my solution here in case anyone else is interested. So basically, in the "Add custom shortcut" command section I had to type "tomboy --new-note" rather than just "tomboy". If you are not aware of certain command options supported by a program, you can ...


2

As seen in the file /usr/share/applications/dde-control-center.desktop, the Exec line is Exec=dbus-send --print-reply --dest=com.deepin.dde.ControlCenter /com/deepin/dde/ControlCenter com.deepin.dde.ControlCenter.Show Using Toggle instead of Show would better serve our purpose. So, create a new shortcut with the command dbus-send --print-reply --dest=com....


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