356

This feature is called Software Flow Control (XON/XOFF flow control) When one end of the data link (in this case the terminal emulator) can't receive any more data (because the buffer is full or nearing full or the user sends C-s) it will send an "XOFF" to tell the sending end of the data link to pause until the "XON" signal is received. What is ...


227

Open a tiny terminal window somewhere on the screen and run cat in it. Whenever you want to protect the system from your cat, change focus to that window. Not many people know this but this feature was an important design goal for the cat program :). Unfortunately, really clever cats (like my evil beast) know what Ctrl-C is. If your cat is clever enough ...


168

In "terminal" (not a graphic emulator like gterm), Shift+PageUp and Shift+PageDown work.


167

ctrlw is the standard "kill word" (aka werase). ctrlu kills the whole line (kill). You can change them with stty. -bash-4.2$ stty -a speed 38400 baud; 24 rows; 80 columns; lflags: icanon isig iexten echo echoe -echok echoke -echonl echoctl -echoprt -altwerase -noflsh -tostop -flusho pendin -nokerninfo -extproc -xcase iflags: -istrip icrnl -...


159

With csh or any shell implementing csh-like history substitution (tcsh, bash, zsh): !! Then Enter. Or alternatively: !-1 Then Enter. Or Ctrl+P, Enter Magic space Also, note that !! and !-1 will not auto-expand for you, until you execute them (when it might be too late). If using bash, you can put bind Space:magic-space into ~/.bashrc, then pressing ...


153

Shiftzz in command mode saves the file and exits.


149

z<CR> or zt puts current line to top of screen (<CR> == Enter) z. or zz puts current line to center of screen z- or zb puts current line to bottom of screen (z<CR>, z., and z- puts the cursor in the first non blank column. zt, zz, and zb leaves the cursor in the current column) More info about scrolling at http://vimdoc.sourceforge....


125

You can use CTRL+J or CTRL+M as an alternative to Enter. They are the control characters for linefeed (LF) and carriage return (CR).


93

This should work: # move x clipboard into tmux paste buffer bind C-p run "tmux set-buffer \"$(xclip -o)\"; tmux paste-buffer" # move tmux copy buffer into x clipboard bind C-y run "tmux save-buffer - | xclip -i"


81

Use Ctrl-a a, or change screen's escape keystroke (option -e).


73

Lock your computer. It's a feature you probably already know how to use and it's super effective. One can easily activate it with Super-L on most linux systems including the common Debian variants. Ctrl-Alt-L on Ubuntu. Windows-L on Windows. Control-Shift-Eject or Control-Shift-Power on OS X. All input (except a special unique combination) is blocked ...


71

Here, in Xfce4 Settings Manager or launch xfce4-settings-manager from terminal, In Window Manager configuration, find the keyboard part, look for Window operations menu, and then hit on Clear button, which will remove that shortcut key, effects immedately


63

It's very useful to quickly fix typos: sl becomes ls with a single CtrlT. You can use AltT to swap words too (e.g. when switching between service and systemctl...). Historically speaking, the CtrlT feature came to Bash from Emacs in all likelihood. It probably was copied to Emacs from some other editor; it was present in Stanford's E editor (see ...


53

There are a lot of players between your keyboard and the process that finally handles the keyboard event. Among the major pieces of the landscape are the fact that the X system has its own keyboard-handling layer, and X associates different "keycodes" with keys than your Linux base system does. The showkey command is showing you the keycodes in Linux-base-...


53

Those are sequences of characters sent by your terminal when you press a given key. Nothing to do with bash or readline per se, but you'll want to know what sequence of characters a given key or key combination sends if you want to configure readline to do something upon a given key press. When you press the A key, generally terminals send the a (0x61) ...


51

Open vim Even the most intelligent cat will not be able to exit vim.


49

To find out about a key binding. In bash: $ bind -p | grep -a '{' "\e{": complete-into-braces "{": self-insert $ LESS='+/complete-into-braces' man bash complete-into-braces (M-{) Perform filename completion and insert the list of possible com‐ pletions enclosed within braces so the list is available to the shell (see ...


48

Most shells that have a command line editing feature support Emacs key bindings. (a tiny subset) Up Ctrl+P Down Ctrl+N Left Ctrl+B Right Ctrl+F Home Ctrl+A End Ctrl+E Delete Ctrl+D Alternatively, you could set up your shell to use vi command editing mode, by adding set -o vi to your shell startup file (e.g., ~/.bashrc).  Then, for example, ...


48

There isn't any. By default, the action "Move window to left/right/up/down workspace" has no shortcuts set and that has not changed since Xfce 4.6 to this date. So the shortcuts might have been deprecated earlier or not adopted at all. But there should be Those 'old' shortcuts were originally found in GNOME; I'm aware of this, because I had been using ...


44

Here's a one-off fix: sudo sh -c 'dumpkeys |grep -v cr_Console |loadkeys'


44

Right click a panel -> Panel submenu -> Add New Items... Add an instance of PulseAudio Plugin Right click the icon that just appeared in your panel and click "Properties". Make sure "Enable keyboard shortcuts for volume control" is enabled. You may have to install the PulseAudio Plugin first. In Debian and Debian-based distributions, the package is called ...


42

To disable Ctrl-s permanently in terminal just add this line at the end of your .bashrc script (generally in your home directory) stty -ixon


41

A simpler solution for Mac OS-X This builds off of Alex's answer and uses stuff that didn't exist at the time. If you are using homebrew (and if you aren't, why aren't you?) then you can just do this: brew install reattach-to-user-namespace Then in your ~/.tmux.conf: set-option -g default-command "reattach-to-user-namespace -l zsh" # or bash... bind C-c ...


41

ZZ in normal mode saves the current file if modified and exits or closes the current window/tab (same as :x but not :wq which writes the file even if it hasn't been modified). To exit unconditionally after having written all the modified files in all windows, tabs and hidden buffers, you need :xa (it still won't exit if some files can't be written for a ...


40

The copy-pipe command was added as of version 1.8. It copies a selection to the tmux buffer and pipes it to a command. Now there is no need for a prefix binding. Here's an example: bind -t vi-copy y copy-pipe "xclip" # For OS X users: bind -t vi-copy y copy-pipe "reattach-to-user-namespace pbcopy" Now when you have some text selected in copy-mode, y will ...


40

In a terminal window (I tested only aterm, rxvt, vte and xterm) you can select the end of line, which pasted back has the effect of pressing Enter: # ____________type the command____________ __select to end of line__ # / \/ \ bash-4.2$ xmodmap -e "keycode 135 = Pointer_Button2" ...


40

FWIW, this is what worked on my environment (rhel5.x) using zsh's default. bindkey "^[[1;5C" forward-word bindkey "^[[1;5D" backward-word


38

From man xkeyboard-config: Key(s) to change layout ┌───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐ │Option Description │ ├──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────...


38

or you can toggle it with Alt-. (Alt-period)


38

SHORT ANSWER: type CTRL+ALT+F2 when AFK, and CTRL+ALT+F7` when coming back. LONG ANSWER: Although I upvoted the solution proposed by @cas, I think that opening a cat terminal has a few disadvantages: when the sloppy mouse option is enabled, it suffices that the cat pushes the mouse outside of the window area of the terminal to redirect the input to ...


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