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The problem was, that /etc/lvm/lvm.conf wasn't reloaded with just calling update-grub. This article gave me the right hint (later also this one in German): Take a backup of the existing initramfs and rebuild it, so that the changed /etc/lvm/lvm.conf file will be used for subsequent reboots. To rebuild, I found the update-initramfs command and executed it ...


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I know you wanted to limit your hardware to a single cable, so this answer is for people who do not have that requirement. Use 2 USB-net cards and an RJ45 patch cable. This way you do not need to deal with special kernel drivers or special software. Simply setup the net cards in both ends and transfer via this network using normal tools like rsync or NFS.


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The return value was removed from debugfs_create_u32 at 2b07021a940ce1cdec736ec0cacad6af77717afc which went into v5.7: debugfs: remove return value of debugfs_create_u32() No one checks the return value of debugfs_create_u32(), as it's not needed, so make the return value void, so that no one tries to do so in the future. so you can just get rid of that if....


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ensure /etc/machine-id exist and is valid/not empty test -s /etc/machine-id instead "kernel-install" command will not provide kernel below /boot from systemd package called in kernel-core rpm post-install script (rpm -qp --scripts kernel-core-*.rpm) reinstall kernel-core package then dnf reinstall kernel-core


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Cold boot or/and static discharge


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There's a github project called isw and it has a configuration file and a program which writes the fan values to the ec storage. MSI decided to use some proprietary system for their fans, but this program does all that for you. I'm also pretty sure it's on the AUR. Make sure to read all the wiki pages on github first though.


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Check your /etc/rsyslog.conf and look for any kern.* rules. That should tell you where the kernel levels are printing out to. You can also specify your own location like: kern.debug /var/log/kernDebug.log for kernel messages at the debug level.


2

All the packages that were ever released by CentOS can be found in an archive on vault.centos.org. You can just point yum to the package(s) you want. For example: yum install https://vault.centos.org/7.3.1611/updates/x86_64/Packages/kernel-devel-3.10.0-514.26.2.el7.x86_64.rpm If you need yum to automatically pull in archived dependencies of some package, ...


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If you have the kernel-devel RPM you want, you should be able to install it using yum - for example: # yum install kernel-devel-3.10.0-514.el7.x86_64.rpm yum will resolve the dependencies for you (assuming it is possible to do so from the repos that are configured on your system), and will install them along with the RPM.


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As user414777 commented, the missing syscall is clock_nanosleep_time64. This was originally added to the kernel on the 5.6 branch as part of the solution to the Year 2038 problem, and it was backported to every branch starting with 5.1. The GNU C Library started utilising these 64-bit time functions in v2.31, and the issue I encountered with OpenSSH is ...


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This is a known issue with older kernels (Bugzilla 1288237). The fix has been backported into newer kernsla and is tracked under the following security advisories: RHSA-2020:1016 RHSA-2019:3979 This problem is believed to have been introduced by the following upstream commit: https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/commit/?id=...


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It's unclear what you're actually trying to do, but on Linux (and some other systems) you can get a file descriptor to the current executable with open("/proc/self/exe", ...). That will work even if the file was removed or never existed in the filesystem. Just like /dev/tty (which will always open the controlling tty of the calling process -- if ...


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There's no file descriptor to the binary file being executed, only memory mappings. (See, e.g. ls -l /proc/self/fd and cat /proc/self/maps on Linux.) The memory mappings will point to the same file, of course, but that's what happens with shared libraries, too. In the case of the main program file, on Linux, writes to it while it's being used by a running ...


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You're missing alsa-sof-firmware. You could install it by following the instructions poster here: https://github.com/thesofproject/sof-bin


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Perform the read using bash can be done also with dd(1) If you're on a limited and basic Unix system which doesn't have the some of the commands mentioned above (from python all the way to memdump and stuff like that) You can use dd(1), which should be available in the most limited Unix environment. Example for dumping the first few bytes from the process: $ ...


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Here is a native solution using auditd which uses the audit features built into the Linux kernel. auditctl -a always,task # the one below should also work; pick one auditctl -a always,exit -F arch=b64 -S clone,fork,vfork,execve systemctl restart auditd # wait a while and use your computer Alternatively, write audit's config file, enable the service and ...


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Some folks have experienced lockups with fuseext2, so here's an alternative: debugfs /dev/sdb4 debugfs opens a CLI. rdump <directory> <target> will recursively copy an entire directory from the disk's filesystem to the host filesystem. For example, rdump home /tmp will copy the disk's /home directory to /tmp/home.


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I had the same issue as you where it would fail during boot but would work just fine if manually invoked after that. In checking various logs I realized it looks like udhcpc was initializing while the interfaces were coming up, and as such the first few discovers weren't actually going out over the interface. Ideally I'd make it so that udhcpc doesn't start ...


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The answer is (hidden) in the NOTES section of the mmap(2) page: A file is mapped in multiples of the page size. For a file that is not a multiple of the page size, the remaining memory is zeroed when mapped, and writes to that region are not written out to the file. But, that text could be a little clearer, and the discussion of SIGBUS in ...


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Speaking of verifying files: There are fs-verity https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/filesystems/fsverity.html dm-verity https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/admin-guide/device-mapper/verity.html The issue is I'm not aware of any manuals/how-tos to set up the former, and the latter is AFAIK only implemented in Android. Then there are tools like AIDE, ...


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This error is an ENOMEM (out of memory error), because CMA size needs to be bigger than one raw frame of the resolution that the display will use 1920x1080 32bpp needs about 8MB, and the default is 16MB so it was working, but 3840x2160 32bpp needs a bit more than 32MB Armbian changes the default size to 128M on the kernel configuration, using ...


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The open count is returned by DM_DEV_STATUS ioctl, I see it in my strace: ioctl(3, DM_DEV_STATUS, {version=4.0.0, data_size=16384, name="fedora-swap", flags=DM_EXISTS_FLAG} => {version=4.42.0, data_size=305, dev=makedev(0xfd, 0x2), name="fedora-swap", uuid="LVM-T3AyeS3A7de018NxTFWF0VlGG9nvww0aKeYyylJXyg92FDUfj7qe0NkAoVFgYYf1",...


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