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1

I suspect your memory is playing tricks on you: the file system code has been in /fs in the Linux kernel source ever since version 0.01.


0

Short answer The reason the path won't show on your system is that the cpufreq driver isn't loaded. This driver is the one creating the /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpuY/cpufreq in sysfs and populating it with values. When trying to compile the kernel without CONFIG_X86_INTEL_PSTATE, it is forced to enabled by the pcc_freq and acpi_freq driver compilation ...


1

As in "can", go ahead! Open Source and all that. Does it explode in your face? Probably not (if the GCC folks did it right, that is; quite sure if you don't use some experimental/unreleased version). But it is not one of the compiler options getting very extensive testing/vetting by kernel builders. Go at your own risk. Do track down and report any ...


1

Compilation is actually rather read/write intensive than just consuming large amounts of memory so it is a good measurement for IO-speeds of your memory. But the bottleneck is probably either your disk or your CPU so there is better RAM benchmarks


0

For anyone else running into this problem - I was able to solve it by: Booting into a working kernel, and removing all software which had been installed from standalone rpm files. (While still booted from the older working kernel) regenerating initramfs for the latest kernel using dracut, in my case this was for 5.5.11: sudo dracut /boot/initramfs-5.5.11-...


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To get the processor info you can use : sudo dmidecode -t 4 |grep Version or: lscpu |grep "Model name:" The update can be done by installing firmwares and microcodes from buster-backports. See Getting microcode updates sooner using Debian backports , how to check the microcode version and updates. Intel: How to update/install microcode downloaded from ...


2

I believe the 'Host Bridge' that lspci is referring to is the PCI host bridge that connects the CPU to the PCI bus. I have a 3rd generation Core i5 and my host bridge description says: 00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation Xeon E3-1200 v2/3rd Gen Core processor DRAM Controller (rev 09) I think what it means is that the host bridge is designed for use with ...


0

In applets you can find CPU TEMPERATURE INDICATOR. If you are freshening up your Update-manager so there is actually kernel 5.3.0-45 to be installed. Both working on my ryzen7 flawlessly. Latest (all) kernels here: Index of /~kernel-ppa/mainline Best before any action is a backup by timeshift.


0

You are missing kldload linux64


0

Are you perhaps trying to write a kernel .config file manually from scratch? The kernel source Makefiles have built-in configuration tools: for example, run make menuconfig to get a text-based menu interface for configuring the kernel. See Documentation/admin-guide/README.rst for a complete list of configuration tools available. The configuration tools ...


0

Options with descriptions are specified in Kconfig in each subdirectoy. To see all of them, you need to concatenate all Kconfig files (e.g. using find), or you can do something like make menuconfig, where you have a hierarchical menu with descriptions as help texts. The currently selected options are stored in the .config file in the root directory.


0

You should head over to https://bugzilla.redhat.com and report this as a bug. It is very unlikely that we here can help. Only advise (for now) is to delete the oldest offending kernel(s), so you only keep the very last one and one (or two) working kernels, that way an update won't erase a working kernel.


0

We hit the bad_irq stack when if 99,900 of the previous 100,000 interrupts have not been handled. The other 100-of-100,000 interrupts may have been a correctly functioning device sharing an IRQ with the failing one. So it will be a matter of chance that 99,900 are unhandled for disabling the irq, the irq will not get disabled even if total unahandled is 99,...


1

Short answer NUMA ACPI is probably disabled from (A) BIOS or (B) cmdline or (C) kernel config. See details below. More details Looking at the numactl source code (from github), I see that the error above is coming from the checknuma() function: void checknuma(void) { static int numa = -1; if (numa < 0) { if (numa_available() < 0)...


0

I had the same issue! I guess the problem is that Mint would save the display setting every time you turn off the computer. If there is just one time you turn off the computer with the second monitor connected and then boot without the second monitor, Mint would get confused and lose track of your display setting thereafter. Have you tried to log out and ...


0

The main point is to save kernel RAM (which is not paged). Rather than building a kernel with everything in it, the kernel is built with some important drivers in it, and the rest available as modules. At boot time the kernel probes the various buses it finds, like pcie, and tries to find modules which claim to be drivers for the various things found. These ...


0

--> You may write a C program as below: test_mod.c #include <linux/module.h> #include <linux/kernel.h> int init_module(void) { printk("Hello All\n This is a test init\n"); return 0; } void cleanup_module(void) { printk("Good Bye"); } --> make object file: echo "obj-m := test_mod.o" > Makefile --> compile by running : make -...


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On the same dts directory DTS/{manufacturer-name}/some-dts-evb.dts There are one Makefile, open it and you can see which .dts file will be used for. dtb-$(CONFIG_ARCH_XXXXXX) += some-dts-evb.dtb


0

I don't think you can trace kernel calls simply with userspace tools. What you are probably looking for is ftrace, then you could (if your kernel supports it) do something like this: sysctl kernel.ftrace_enabled=1 echo function_graph > /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/current_tracer echo 1 > /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/tracing_on cat /proc/net/tcp echo 0 > /...


1

If the GRUB boot menu includes multiple kernel versions, try booting with an older version. (There should always be at least the current kernel and the kernel used by the OS installer: the latter has a version number like 0-rescue-<numbers>. If the boot is successful with an older kernel, then the problem might be a damaged/missing initramfs file. ...


2

Try booting with installation media, and diagnose/fix from there. Back up anything important! Chances are the machine or the system is broken, needing a migration or a reinstall from scratch.


0

No, just editing /etc/fstab cannot cause xfs_repair to be executed. For other filesystem types, it would work. But XFS is special here. Changing the 6th field of /etc/fstab to a non-zero value on a XFS filesystem will cause the system to run fsck.xfs, whose man page says: NAME fsck.xfs - do nothing, successfully [...] However, the system ...


0

You have asked for a lazy unmount (umount -l). This will only unmount the filesystem when there are no more processes accessing it. The documentation (man umount) itself says -l Lazy unmount. Detach the filesystem from the filesystem hierarchy now, and cleanup all references to the filesystem as soon as it is not busy anymore. In this scenario you ...


1

If the files on /dev/sda have errors, then you need to run fsck on it. Keep in mind that it won't actually repair the disk itself but just the files. If the disk indeed has errors and it's failing, then it's best to replace the disk and restore the data from a backup because if it gets bad enough, you'll possibly have data loss especially if the disk dies ...


0

For those using Centos, this will work: sudo yum install "kernel-devel-uname-r == $(uname -r)" It will find the headers for the exact version of the kernel that you're using.


3

Try it: cd $(mktemp -d) cp /bin/sleep . ./sleep 120 & echo test > sleep The shell’s redirection operator changes the file in-place, and this fails with a “text file busy” error. It is however possible to replace the file: cp /bin/ls sleep This is how, for example, packages can be updated while the program they contain is running. The old file ...


1

The default behaviour is to apply configuration settings for the current architecture (which isn’t the architecture used for the last configuration). When configuring for cross-building, you need to specify the architecture again: make menuconfig ARCH=arm64


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As it says: A start job is running for LSB ( 3 out of 5 min ). It requires 5 minutes to finish. After that, your machine will continue booting. Did you wait the job run time to finish ? Do you have still problem after job finished?


1

-l | --loader NAME Specify a loader (defaults to \\elilo.efi) A kernel with EFI-stub is still not a loader. To boot from BIOS it has to be an EFI-application. All the boot loaders have .EFI suffix. I think it is possible to turn a kernel into such a directly bootable object, but normally it is one of the boot loaders that gets started (with or ...


2

/proc is the interface between the kernel and userspace for all its contents, and most of those contents aren’t available in any other way (for content under pid directories, outside of that process). So hidepid=2 is effective in hiding information such as a process’ command line and environment from other users. Some information can be determined through ...


0

When you do a listen you specify a port, as the port has to be well known. This end has an IP (or more than one) and a port. When you do a connect you specify the IP and port of the remote listener. The local IP is determined by the OS, and a port is assigned (it could be any number). The connection can be identified by ( (remote IP, remote port), (local ...


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Even though the wireless hardware switch was enabled this whole time, switching it on and off a few times fixed the issue


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It's not mandatory for a Linux kernel module to have a description filled in. If one does have it, you can find it in the module source code as a MODULE_DESCRIPTION declaration like this: MODULE_DESCRIPTION("Intel HDA driver"); which you can inspect via modinfo on the .ko object: $ modinfo snd_hda_intel filename: /lib/modules/5.3.0-40-generic/kernel/...


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I have figured out the issue. Since I was calling /bin/sh which is dash, it does not accept [[ ]]. I have tweaked [[ ]]. [[ $CACHE -gt 5000000 ]] I instead used: [ $CACHE -gt 5000000 ] And it's working fine now.


5

What I specifically want know here is irrespective of the underlying hardwares it is on how Linux kernel manages to work on all different pcs Before anything else, the kernel can run on any PC as long it's compiled for that specific architecture. With your general purpose computers, the architecture tends to be the same (x86_64/amd64) but this changes when ...


2

The TCP/IP and UDP/IP protocols know a "session" which is defined by local and remote IP address and port [1]. A TCP/IP package, for example, will contain source and target IP address and port [2]. A server or client (say, Firefox) which has more than one connection open will distinguish at the OSI [3] session layer by address and port. Please open a ...


2

Why doesn't Linux automatically clear caches? It will. ron> free -g total used free shared buffers cached Mem: 504 415 88 1 0 352 -/+ buffers/cache: 62 441 Swap: 0 0 0 Cached memory should still be considered free memory. ...


3

Because there is never any benefit in dropping caches. Forgetting stuff in not where the gain in. The gain is in reusing memory, this will happen anyway. As some point data will be evicted from memory. However doing these large jobs, may cause harm to performance: if data is cached but never re-used, then it is causing other data to be evicted, with no ...


0

In case this helps others who see this... I had an issue where it was complaining about failed dependency not found: kernel-devel-uname-r as stated in the question. Running rpm -q kernel-devel showed it installed and --provides showed the proper info, but akmodsbuild still couldn't find it. Solution: rpm --rebuilddb After that akmods properly ...


2

A docker image doesn't have a Kernel, It uses the Kernel from the host machine that you are running Docker on. You can run this command inside your Docker container and from your CentOS host, It will show up the same result uname -sr There is a similar question on Super User Ps:// By the way, you should upgrade your CentOS host to kernel 3.10+ as ...


0

Exactly the same. However if we are processing an interrupt then possibly nothing, or nothing until we finish. What we do in all cases: unconditionally save mode, and set mode to supervisor mode (done by hardware. Triggered by interrupt) unconditionally save state and switch stack run interrupt code unconditionally switch stack back, restore state and ...


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