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4

The code comment within drivers/nvme/host/core.c in Linux kernel source seems to explain it best: static int nvme_configure_apst(struct nvme_ctrl *ctrl) { /* * APST (Autonomous Power State Transition) lets us program a * table of power state transitions that the controller will * perform automatically. We configure it with a simple * ...


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Some of it is avoiding some of the trips across the system call boundary. That's true, but another aspect is that the Linux system call interface is simultaneously very general (i.e. has to deal with many different kinds of applications and systems) and very narrow (the system call parameters deal very specifically with the current request only). The ...


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According to public Whois lookup information, 45.52.*.* network segment belongs to Frontier Communications of America, Inc. Since you are receiving invalid responses from all over that segment, it looks like avahi-daemon has not been restricted from accepting packets from outside your own network and it's responding to random queries from all the other ...


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If it's a real server, it has a BMC. You should at the very least examine the BMCs event log. That will tell you at least some information about why the server disappeared. (Consider that syslog is just a normal file created by a daemon - that means in addition to hardware problems, the daemon could have died, or the filesystem got confused. That's why ...


2

Those avahi-daemon service could be the reason for the machine unexpected shutdown? No, 100%. Considering nothing had been logged just before the server went down, it could most likely indicate a hardware failure, power loss or someone simply pressed the reset button. If your server contains an IPMI/BMC chip you can check its hardware log using ipmitool. ...


2

Before I continue let me disclaim: If your professor is using apt, then she is using a debian-based system. I recommend using the same distro instead of your own "from-scratch" system. If you and using a from-scratch system because you want a custom kernel, then you can install that kernel a debian-based system. If you do use apt, you'll end up ...


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Short answer, the kernel has to deal with many different situations/application/hardware. Reimplementation of the stack is done when you know your hardware and/or your application communication needs. You can then code just for that universe. Say you have a small sensing device sending data periodically over UDP. You could create UDP/IP packets with most of ...


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Remember what you're running (to be honest it doesn't actually tell you what you're really running, for that refer to systemd : how to get the running target systemctl get-default Switch to single-user mode: systemctl isolate rescue.target You may want to kill some remaining processes. Switch back to whatever mode you had in the beginning (normally it's ...


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No, there isn't any sysctl or alike for that. You should use a LD_PRELOAD hack to override the openat() function.


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The kernel’s CRC functions are available to the kernel (including modules), but nowhere else. Since you’re referring to /usr/include/linux I’m assuming you want to use them from a program outside the kernel. There are two solutions available to you: if your program’s license is compatible with the kernel’s license, you could copy lib/crc32.c to your project ...


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x86 ring 0 = supervisor mode = kernel mode x86 ring 3 = user mode Docker containers and the docker daemon run in user mode. The containers share the kernel with the host system. Docker uses new features in the kernel, in the same way that other programs use old features in the kernel. If you run code in supervisor mode, then it runs in the kernel, and has ...


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For some reason, connected HDD [connected under the RAID Controller] is not visible as a block device and thus I can't mount the existing partition This is normal if you have done nothing other than connect plug the disk in or connect the sata/sas cable from the raid controller to the disk. You have to enter the RAID Controller setup screen, usually Ctrl-R, ...


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There is another 9p.txt document at https://landley.net/kdocs/Documentation/filesystems/9p.txt that has a detailed listing specifically about some cache modes and other items. It seems that if you access a single system then the cache should not hinder your activity. It is just that 9p will not be pushing any of the modification from one client to any other ...


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KMS-enabled kernels overrule any vga= setting before init completes, when modesetting is initiated, functionally making whether vga=ask works or not moot. Instead, use video= with the specific mode desired on the vttys. With video=, you're not limited to VESA modes - any mode supported by the display can be used. It's even possible sometimes with video= to ...


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