80

FreeBSD: sysctl debug.kdb.panic=1 Linux (more info here): echo c > /proc/sysrq-trigger


44

An "oops" is a Linux kernel problem bad enough that it may affect system reliability. Some "oops"es are bad enough that the kernel decides to stop running immediately, lest there be data loss or other damage. These are called kernel panics. The latter term is primordial, going back to the very earliest versions of Linux's Unix forebears, which also print a ...


34

I have two suggestions to start. The first you're not going to like. No matter how stable you think your overclocked system is, it would be my first suspect. And any developer you report the problem to will say the same thing. Your stable test workload isn't necessarily using the same instructions, stressing the memory subsystem as much, whatever. Stop ...


22

mkdir /tmp/kpanic && cd /tmp/kpanic && printf '#include <linux/kernel.h>\n#include <linux/module.h>\nMODULE_LICENSE("GPL");static int8_t* message = "buffer overrun at 0x4ba4c73e73acce54";int init_module(void){panic(message);return 0;}' > kpanic.c && printf 'obj-m += kpanic.o\nall:\n\tmake -C /lib/modules/$(shell uname -...


18

From man proc: /proc/sys/kernel/panic This file gives read/write access to the kernel variable panic_timeout. If this is zero, the kernel will loop on a panic; if nonzero it indicates that the kernel should autoreboot after this number of seconds. When you use the software watchdog device driver, the recommended setting is 60.


14

An oops is a specific error the kernel encounters. An Oops contains the following information: Brief description Oops # Which CPU it happened on, and the code the CPU was executing Register contents Oops is a way to debug kernel code, and there are utilities for helping with that. A kernel panic means the system cannot recover and must be restarted. ...


8

The kernel is meant to keep running no matter what. So any way to cause a kernel panic by user interaction (other than deliberate vandalism by all-powerful root, like Bruce Ediger jokinkly proposes, and most kernels today are built so most of those pranks won't work in the first place) is an extremely serious bug, that would get fixed fast.


8

Yes! Maybe some of the recurive calls are either documented or part of function names? Then, a find/grep should reveal them. Here is a command to do it: find /usr/src/linux/ -name "*.c" -exec grep recursive {} ";" -ls Piping this through | wc -l gives me 270, which is, since -ls prints one additional line per file, at least 135 files+functions. Let's ...


8

Serial port The serial port is an old and reliable communication protocol hardware that the Linux kernel supports and most emulators emulate. You can stream the kernel messages to a host file or console through it: VirtualBox: How does one Capture the Entire Kernel Panic on Boot | Stack Overflow QEMU: to console: How to switch to qemu monitor console ...


7

The Linux kernel coding style does not prohibit recursive functions. You do need to be careful and not overflow the stack, but that caution is not specific to recursive functions. Don't gratuitously use recursion when a loop would do, and keep in mind that you and the functions calling you only get 8kB total, but occasionally recursion is the right tool.


7

Linux does dump panics to the screen...depending on your definition of the screen. What Linux actually does is dump to the system console. Often this is the screen, but can be the serial console (or elsewhere) instead. However, most people are running X on their desktops. Which means that the console is not on the screen, the frame buffer is. You would ...


7

This issue has to do with a hardware failure, specifically it looks like the memory in bank 4, (DIMM 4 - I would assume), is faulty. The MCE facility (Machine Check Events) is not widely known about but I"ve answered several questions on the site related to it. Does kernel: EDAC MC0: UE page 0x0 point to bad memory, a driver, or something else? OS errors : ...


6

A Linux kernel panic is a subroutine call that the kernel executes when the kernel logic determines that a condition exists that makes continued execution of the normal logic impossible or irresponsible. The kernel can call a panic when: It detects a software error in the kernel code or stack When there is a run-time condition such as out-of-memory with no ...


6

using kill I think you could try the following: $ kill -6 1 This sends signal # 6 to process #1 (the init process). If you read up in the signals man page: "man 7 signals": Signal Value Action Comment ------------------------------------------------------------------------- SIGHUP 1 Term Hangup detected on controlling ...


6

To be sure that your machine generates a "core" file when a kernel failure occurs, you should confirm the "sysctl" settings of your machine. IMO, following should be the settings (minimal) in /etc/sysctl.conf: kernel.core_pattern = /var/crash/core.%t.%p kernel.panic=10 kernel.unknown_nmi_panic=1 Execute sysctl -p after making changes in the /etc/sysctl....


5

The config file is boot (grub) configuration file itself, since it is a parameter invoked at the boot time and grub cannot be expected to read from some other config file while the filesystem is not mounted. However, that being a initialized setting, the runtime can also be modified through sysctl. So, essentially updating /etc/sysctl.conf with parameter ...


5

I just had the same problem on gentoo with a 3.5.0 kernel. No matter what online example I tried no output got to the client until I ran the following command: dmesg -n 7 I originally tried dmesg -n 8 which was suggested in the kernel documentation but that returned localhost ~ # dmesg -n 8 dmesg: unknown level '8' where dmesg -n 7 worked localhost ~ ...


5

a) Check if kernel messages are being logged to a file by rsyslog daemon vi /etc/rsyslog.conf And add the following kern.* /var/log/kernel.log Restart the rsyslog service. /etc/initd.d/rsyslog restart b) Take a note of the loaded modules `lsmod >/your/home/dir` c) As the panic is not reproducible, wait for it to happen d) Once the ...


5

Well I don't believe a standard Fedora kernel package will include any modules which would trigger this taint so the question is, what other kernel modules have you installed? Common candidates would be graphics drivers (though I think those will mostly set the "proprietary" bit) and wireless drivers. If you can find anything in the lsmod output that you ...


5

Turns out the issue was i2c_hid This seems to be some kind of touchpad driver. For some reason, when I disable it, I can still use my touchpad. It could be that the touch screen on the laptop was using this driver, too, because that doesn't work. I don't like to mung up my laptop screen with fingerprints, anyway... So bye bye i2c_hid! I fixed it by adding ...


5

Linux Kernel With MSI B450 The kernel fail in this case because of the support of the iommu feature; you can use some specific kernel adjustment (parameter) to fix your booting issue, this video demonstrate how to edit/apply the kernel parameters; here are some possibles solutions, try the different proposed parameters and choose the one that match best ...


4

I don't know why this wasn't mentioned before... sudo kill -9 1 Panics with the message "tried to kill init".


4

This message comes from the linux kernel. More precisely it come from the perf_duration function in linux/kernel/events/core.c : static void perf_duration_warn(struct irq_work *w) { printk_ratelimited(KERN_INFO "perf: interrupt took too long (%lld > %lld), lowering " "kernel.perf_event_max_sample_rate to %d\n", __report_avg, ...


3

Error SRAT: Hotplug area too small is not related to your I/O problem, it's about memory in the SRAT hotadd area. I have such issues on all my Hyper-V guest systems working on CentOS with >= 3Gb of RAM.


3

In Linux Kernel, (I've seen in 3 and above) there's option in the .config. CONFIG_PANIC_TIMEOUT is the parameter and defaults to 0. In these versions of Linux kernel, Lekensteyn's answer will also work. But that variable is taking from the .config only. int panic_timeout = CONFIG_PANIC_TIMEOUT;


3

The steps you referred to describe how to examine an initrd image, i.e., how to unpack (via gzip and cpio) the initrd-2.6.23-0.104.rc3.fc8.img file into a directory (initrd/ here, created anywhere, with mkdir). It's just a step towards finding the problem, no solution in itself.


3

Actually you don't need the swap partition and the /boot partition. But returning to your question: yes, the swap is used as virtual memory (and also for hibernation). If both the swap file and the physical RAM fill up, you most likely won't have a kernel panic: applications will just start to be killed by the kernel's out-of-memory killer. But at this ...


3

➜ ~ dmesg | grep -i 'taint' [ 10.029333] vboxdrv: module verification failed: signature and/or required key missing - tainting kernel [ 10.029364] Disabling lock debugging due to kernel taint


3

Another way to do it is to examine the taint file of each module in /sys/module: #!/bin/bash cat /proc/modules | while read module rest do if [[ $(od -A n /sys/module/$module/taint) != " 000012" ]] ; then echo $module fi done If a module has no taint then the taint file will only contain a newline, which od represents as "000012". You can'...


3

I did as schaiba said, so: backup your sensitive stuff (for me only /home dir) reinstall operating system


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