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71

you can do this by 7zip software: sudo apt-get install p7zip-full 7z x iso_file.iso on Fedora: 7za x iso_file.iso


66

Seems to be pretty straightforward to do with genisoimage, in the package with the same name on Debian: genisoimage -o output_image.iso directory_name There are many options to cover different cases, so you should check the man page to see what fits your particular use case. See also How-To: Create ISO Images from Command-Line


64

An ISO file isn't a file system. It contains a file system. From a usage point of view, it functions the same way as a hard disk or USB device or DVD - you need to have a mount point, i.e. a place in your file system where you can mount it in order to get at the contents.


42

There are three separate concepts here: A block device, which is a physical or virtual device that represents a series of equal sized data blocks. HDDs are block devices. So are data CDs. A filesystem, which defines a way of storing data in a block device that represents a series of files and directories and other filesystem information. ext3 is a file ...


36

Because AMD was the first one to release 64-bit x86 (x86-64) CPUs. the AMD64 architecture was positioned by AMD from the beginning as an evolutionary way to add 64-bit computing capabilities to the existing x86 architecture, as opposed to Intel's approach of creating an entirely new 64-bit architecture with IA-64. The first AMD64-based processor, the ...


22

Making a CD from a folder can be performed with mkisofs. mkisofs -lJR -o output_image.iso directory_name -l : Allow full 31 character filenames. -J : Generate Joliet directory records in addition to regular iso9660 file names. -R : Generate System Use Sharing Protocol (SUSP) and Rock Ridge (RR) records using the Rock Ridge protocol https://linux.die.net/...


17

AMD intially implemented x86-64, before Intel. For this reason, most distros (and other OSs such as OpenBSD) did a first release when it was still AMD only, or renaming to x86-64 wasn't considered worth the effort. I think one of the another contributing factors to this naming confusion was a conflict between Intel and AMD over naming. Intel had an identity ...


15

Yes, you can accomplish this by adding a menu entry to the GRUB boot loader menu. You can add a custom GRUB menu entry by editing /etc/grub.d/40_custom, Example of custom menuentry: exec tail -n +3 $0 # This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries. Simply type the # menu entries you want to add after this comment. Be careful not to change #...


14

Figured it out. It's a two step process. Step 1. Attaching as a block device # the '-nomount' option avoids the 'mount failed' error $ hdiutil attach -nomount debian-8.5.0-amd64-CD-1.iso /dev/disk2 Apple_partition_scheme /dev/disk2s1 Apple_partition_map /dev/disk2s2 Apple_HFS # verify disk is ...


11

No, the ISO image file is not a file system in its own right. Just like a partition can contain a file system, but isn't a file system, does an ISO image file contain a file system, but it isn't a file system. But you need a file system for two things: a place to store the .iso file (assuming if it doesn't come as a shiny silver disc) a directory where to ...


10

You should clarify what you mean by extracting but as far as I understood: in the first case you copy each file and folder out of the ISO file. By making a copy you need to read everything and write everything to a different location mounting just makes the content available but does nothing else (no copy thus no read/write). The content is available as ...


9

To mount a .ccd file created with CloneCD, first translate the file to an .iso file, ccd2iso MyImage.img MyImage.iso Then mount the .iso file, sudo mkdir /tmp/disk mount -o loop -t iso9660 ./MyImage.iso /tmp/disk/


9

Using gparted remove the existing partitions from your usb, and fix the msdos partition table (by going to the device menu and selecting "create partition Table"). Then, create a new partition fat32 by right clicking on the unallocated space and selecting new, making a primary FAT32 partition. Next step create your bootable usb: dd if=/...


9

I tried the Win7 solution described by Microsoft on a Windows machine: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/windows-usb-dvd-download-tool and obtained the 0x80080005 error so went to Debian Stretch 9 to try to build the Windows 10 bootable USB using a e5.onthehub.com college/school ISO. Using dd absolutely doesn't work for Windows 10. This only ...


9

I wouldn't try it on a CD (although it might well be that my old buffering fears are outdated), but it works fine on a USB key; for example: curl -L http://cdimage.debian.org/debian-cd/8.6.0/amd64/iso-cd/debian-8.6.0-amd64-netinst.iso | sudo dd of=/dev/sdf downloads the current Debian network installer and writes it to the sdf key. This works because dd ...


8

The ISO9660 standard does not allow names with other than A-Z, numbers and underscores. No matter which tool you use, if it just creates a plain ISO9660 filesystem, it will likely convert all filenames to respect these restrictions, and possibly even to fit into 8.3 filenames. Support for other characters in filenames, as well as longer filenames and other ...


8

Based on what you have described you should do something like this: dd if=/dev/urandom of=testfile bs=1M count=699 mkisofs -o test_cdrom.iso testfile Once done you can read and write to and from the optical media to your hearts content. One thing that I would suggest is that instead of pretesting the optical media and then attempting to write the actual ...


8

bsdtar (part of the portable libarchive) can parse lots of file formats. This is handy for those whose fingers are very familiar with tar's options (bsdtar xfp foo.iso to extract, bsdtar tf yoyoma.rpm to just inspect the contents). There's also a bsdcpio for those who are familiar with cpio's usage. Many linux distros now include bsdtar, bsdcpio and ...


8

Take this basic command of: mkisofs -o output_image.iso directory_name One step further, by adding a volume label to the iso, and compressing the iso-image with gzip mkisofs -V volume_label -r folder_location | gzip > output-image-comressed.iso.gz


8

The yum-config-manager program is not a standalone package. It is part of yum-utils package, thus: yum install yum-utils


7

You can't cat the two CentOS 6 ISOs together and get the combined version of them. cat them would work if they had been split from one big ISO file, but they're two distinct ISOs created separate from one another. If you're looking to combine the two DVDs in to one use the mkdvdiso.sh script from here and run it on a directory that contains the DVD1 and ...


7

Method #1 I generally just do this via the command line if I want to copy a DVD to a directory and then make it into an ISO: $ cd /dir/where/you/save/the/dvd Now insert DVD to be copied: $ dvdbackup -M $ genisoimage -dvd-video -udf -o movie.iso /dir/where/you/save/the/dvd $ eject /dev/dvd Method #2 If on the other hand if I just want to make an ISO ...


7

md5sum *.img | sort Should make any duplicates obvious.


7

One difference is efficiency, and thus speed. For example, you could get the bytes one by one and copy them to the device, with cat: cat archlinux.iso > /dev/sdx In theory cat will move each byte independently. That is a slow process, although in practice there will be buffers involved. With dd and a good block size (usually related to the physical ...


6

If the BIN file contains CD-Audio tracks you cannot convert it to an ISO image! The reason for this is that, unlike e.g. a CD-ROM, the data structure of an audio CD is fundamentally incompatible with an ISO 9660 file system. See the link below for a paper that gives a good explanation of this: http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/9581 However, you could ...


6

I don't know Arch Linux, but let me share what worked for me using openSUSE Leap 42.2 with GNOME 3.20. openSUSE has a package called gnome-disk-utility. Installing it makes available the Disks app and the ability to mount ISO images from Nautilus. With gnome-disk-utility installed, mounting an ISO image is an easy task: Open Nautilus Browse to an ISO file ...


6

If you are creating an image of the bin directory, either put your boot image in bin/bin/boot.bin or specify it as boot.bin. The boot image path is relative to the source path (bin).


6

ISO9660 is a read-only filesystem. It can't be mounted in rw mode because there is no support for that in the filesystem itself. If you want to make a new ISO with a different set of files, you need to make an entirely new ISO with mkisofs or similar utilities.


6

you can burn your iso file directly to usb by the command dd sudo dd if=<Your iso file location> of=/dev/<Your usb drive>(usually=/dev/sdb) note:use sudo fdisk -l to see what is your usb device name Example : i connect my usb thumb drive ,then i type sudo fdisk -l to show my device name , its (/dev/sdb) so i will type : sudo dd if=./debian-7.8....


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