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ping 8.8.8.8 There are two ways for an IP address to be "externally managed": This gets an IP address through DHCP, and the same DHCP package also contains the default route, which must be set automatically. Or, it is a point-to-point connection, which when made via ppp etc. It will also give you an IP from another endpoint, which you can then use for the ...


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According to the source code, ip neigh show output is based on rtnetlink messages from the kernel. See netlink(7) man page for an example on how to operate a (rt)netlink socket, and the above-mentioned rtnetlink(7) man page for the necessary constants. I guess you'd want a RTM_GETNEIGH message.


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After reading the 1st half, I wondered were you connecting from outside. Is the server on a private network (e.g. 192.168.x.x), is there a NATing router involved. May be the router is changing the address. My router does not do this on ingress ports. It only re-writes the source address. So changing router may help.


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Or use whois $ whois 8.8.8.8 |grep country -i -m 1 |cut -d ':' -f 2 |xargs US


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I had a similar problem that by the time I had played the 10,000 moneys scene was exactly this, and I had been trying to add the missing stuff to /e/n/i.d/etho But studying the man page for interfaces, I noted that ALL of the set of examples had only 2 lines of real data, the ipv4 address/24, and a gateway line specifying the address of my router. So I ...


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I had the same issue. Assigned Adapter2 to the 2nd guest OS. Unique Mac and Ip address assigned for the guests.


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Assuming you are allowed to assign yourself an IP, and I don't know if you've been doing this correctly, your netmask: Mask:255.255.255.0 In combination with your working IP: 192.168.0.161 Leaves you with this subnet: 192.168.0.0/24, which means you in no way could assign yourself any IP starting 192.168.10.. You could only change the last number in 192....


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Some modem cards are doing Proxy ARP. That means you can tell the default route is through the card without gateway and your system will start issuing an ARP request for any IP (eg ARP for 8.8.8.8 following a ping 8.8.8.8), since the card looks like ethernet, as if the whole Internet was on the LAN. If the card is doing proxy ARP, this will work. Example ...


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try IP=$(ip a s dev eth0 | awk '$1=="inet" { split($2,I,"/") ;print I[1] }') ip route add default via $IP dev eth0 you might replace eth0 with a variable. I fail to se the point if eth0 (or whatever modem interface) is DHCP managed, most likely proper routing will be provided.


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You would configure iptables (see your specific distro documentation) to block connections to the IP-addresses in that article, however it is likely these Command-and-Control addresses would frequently change. There are also options such as configuring AppArmour for the specific distro you are using, or security focused desktop distros such as Qubes OS ...


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ip -4 addr show eth1 | grep -oP '(?<=inet\s)\d+(\.\d+){3}'


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Have you tried, this also does same netstat -plnt | grep 27071


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Get a list of local IP addresses and ports listening via TCP/UDP: netstat -planu | awk '/^udp / {print $4}' Get the same info via the /proc filesystem: for h in $(awk 'NR>1{print $2}' /proc/net/tcp); do printf "%s:%d\n" $(printf "%d." $(echo ${h%:*}|sed 's/../0x& /g'|tr ' ' '\n'|tac)|sed 's/\.$/\n/') 0x${h#*:}; done Followed by ip_addr=$(echo ...


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$ awk '/32 host/ { print f } {f=$2}' <<< "$(</proc/net/fib_trie)"


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