29

Unfortunately Jessie as released doesn't fully support Broadwell graphics. The required drivers have been backported though, so if you enable Jessie backports you can fix this. First you need to add Jessie backports to your repositories, if it's not already there (thanks to Anders for the reminder to use a separate file): echo deb http://http.debian.net/...


10

It is the Intel Math Library. It contains optimized versions of functions such as sin, pow, etc typically found in libm. It is needed by software built with the intel compiler unless steps were taken to link it statically.


9

I arrived here after installing nvidia-current from the package repository, and got stuck on a login loop. I looked at the log on ~/.xsession-errors and found the mentioned error: Xlib: extension "GLX" missing on display ":0". I already had uninstalled nvidia-current and the problem persisted. I also didn't have glx-alternative-nvidia installed. As a last ...


8

This is addressed in the intel manpage: Disable or enable TearFree updates. This option forces X to perform all rendering to a backbuffer prior to updating the actual display. It requires an extra memory allocation the same size as a framebuffer, the occasional extra copy, and requires Damage tracking. Thus enabling TearFree requires more memory and is ...


7

For Kaby Lake (and any Intel graphics since Broadwell), you need to install a new kernel and firmware from Jessie backports; as root: echo deb http://http.debian.net/debian jessie-backports main contrib non-free > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/jessie-backports.list apt-get update apt-get -t jessie-backports install linux-image-amd64 firmware-misc-nonfree You ...


7

Please do as root: EDIT /etc/default/grub Find the line that starts with GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX and append i915.enable_rc6=0, giving you for example: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="splash quiet i915.enable_rc6=0" EXECUTE: update-grub REBOOT (optional step) EXECUTE systool -m i915 -av | grep enable_rc6 to check whether you have set this option correctly


6

The Scaling mode property is not yet implemented in the intel driver (see here). It is implemented in the proprietary AMD and NVIDIA drivers and since recentlty in the open source radeon driver (here). However you can work around this limitation by performing the scaling manually with xrandr: Assume your screen has a native resolution of 1920x1080 and you ...


6

Open the terminal and type: sudo xed /etc/lsb-release Edit your file as follow: #DISTRIB_ID=LinuxMint #DISTRIB_RELEASE=18 #DISTRIB_CODENAME=sarah #DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Linux Mint 18 Sarah" DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu DISTRIB_RELEASE=16.04 DISTRIB_CODENAME=xenial DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu 16.04 LTS" Save and exit. Update and run the installer: sudo apt-get ...


6

Run the following command: wget --no-check-certificate https://download.01.org/gfx/RPM-GPG-GROUP-KEY-ilg sudo apt-key add RPM-GPG-GROUP-KEY-ilg Afterwards you may run the following commands: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade This is the fix for the signature problems with the Intel installer Source.


6

The answer was simple: just install nvidia drivers, open the nvidia settings page and set to use the Intel HD GPU only. Login again and you are done. Works perfectly. Battery lasts much much longer and wayland works properly. As soon as the nvidia GPU is enabled, it seems that the fan turns on immediately, and keeps running even when idle. That is probably a ...


6

Don't try to install testing directly on stable! or you'll end up with a FrankenDebian (at best) or will lose a lot of packages due to unrealistic dependencies. The good news is that those updated packages are available in stretch-backports. Debian's mesa had several packaging changes in testing so also in stretch-backports, related to the vendor neutral's ...


5

I know it's an old question but I'm answering for posterity. xrandr-invert-colors is a small app which does exactly what we need. I have both xcalib and xrandr-invert-colors bound to different shortcuts, so that if I do want to invert only my secondary monitor, I can execute both (xcalib will re-invert the primary monitor to normal colours). Get it at ...


5

Never known about the command intel_gpu_time interesting, thank you. This command is part of the package intel-gpu-tools (apt-get install intel-gpu-tools) under Ubuntu and by the look of it the package under RedHat (CentOS) is called exactly the same. So, give yum install intel-gpu-tools a try.


5

Have you tried pressing the monitor's menu button? Use it to select HDMI input. I had a similar problem, completely mystified until I figured this out. Sharing in case you overlooked this.


4

I solved it by updating my kernel from 3.16 to 4.3. For Debian Jessie, the new kernel can be installed from backports: apt-get -t jessie-backports install linux-image-4.6.0-0.bpo.1-686-pae Actual image name will depend on what kind of hardware you have and what kernel flavour you prefer.


4

step: generate a Modeline for your monitor from here : use xrandr to add: xrandr --newmode 1920x1080 "<generated modeline>" add this to output: xrandr --addmode VGA1 1920x1080 switch to this mode: xrandr --output VGA1 --mode 1920x1080


4

I solved this by updating the kernel to version 4.15 or above. I added the stretch-backports source in APT, and then installed the newest kernel version. Versions 4.14 and below do not support Coffee Lake graphics.


3

xrandr Using xrandr will show you which cards are available. $ xrandr --listproviders Providers: number : 1 Provider 0: id: 0x49 cap: 0xb, Source Output, Sink Output, Sink Offload crtcs: 2 outputs: 8 associated providers: 0 name:Intel On this system I have 1 graphics card, an Intel, which has 2 ports (outputs). You can see the outputs with xrandr like so: ...


3

If you want to invert both screens with one command, you will have to stick with the really nice script: xrandr-invert-colors If this is unavailable for you, and it's acceptable to run two commands in one go, use this: xcalib -i -a -s 0 && xcalib -i -a -s 1 Which will invert both screens at the same time. If you have three or more screens, just ...


3

I just removed xserver-xorg-video-intel, and rebooted. My /var/log/Xorg.0.log says : [ 17.662] (II) modeset(0): using drv /dev/dri/card0 My Xorg driver is modeset. My 3 screens setup is working well. The modesetting driver is builtin. So no need to install extra driver.


3

Since you've already enabled backports, I'd suggest trying the latest backported kernel, 4.5.1-1~bpo8+1 as of this writing. The kernel's Intel GPU driver has been vastly improved since 3.16, and should be much more stable.


3

I am just here to answer this question Although I have not used a Optimus laptop for years. Bumblebee community created a kernel module bbswitch https://github.com/Bumblebee-Project/bbswitch You can turn off the nvidia card as long as a driver is not loaded. # to check status $ cat /proc/acpi/bbswitch # to turn off or on respectably $tee /proc/...


3

The correct way of doing this is by using these two commands: echo 350 | sudo tee /sys/class/drm/card0/gt_boost_freq_mhz echo 350 | sudo tee /sys/class/drm/card0/gt_max_freq_mhz 350 is the minimum frequency that the iGPU supports. gt_boost_freq_mhz controls the boost clock (default 1250MHz) gt_max_freq_mhz controls the nominal max clock speed (default ...


3

Sandy Bridge’s outputs don’t have enough bandwidth to support your monitor’s full resolution at 60Hz, however it should be possible to create a mode which will get you some of the way there. This article gives details on the calculation process. In your case, the important factors are that your monitor’s native resolution is 3840×2160, and that HDMI 1.4 has ...


3

Kernels 4.13 and 4.14 have support for Coffee Lake, but as an alpha, so you need to boot the kernel with i915.alpha_support=1 You can do this by editing the kernel command line manually during the boot, or by editing /etc/default/grub’s GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT. In the latter case, run update-grub before rebooting... This won’t be necessary with kernel ...


3

And thought, pretty would mean it might need a dedicated GPU. For games or CAD/3D modelling maybe. For normal day to day tasks - hardly required. So I just wanted to know, does it work nicely of an Intel graphics? Linux drivers for Intel graphics are considered top notch. Multiple people around me, me including, have laptops with integrated Intel graphics ...


2

Well, apparently the recommendations I've found were not totally wrong. I removed the nomodeset part and everything was fine and dandy. I didn't find out why in none of the logs. Here is the relevant part of the /etc/default/grub: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet acpi_backlight=vendor"


2

The glxinfo, which is available in mesa-utils can be used to display which video adapter is used for OpenGL graphics. For example: ➜ ~ glxinfo | grep "OpenGL renderer string" OpenGL renderer string: Mesa DRI Intel(R) Ivybridge Mobile


2

In /etc/default/grub I changed this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="text nomodeset acpi_backlight=legacy" to: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="text nomodeset" update-grub, reboot, and start mdm by hand: /etc/init.d/mdm start No idea why the backlight should suddenly break.


2

Hard shutdowns sound a lot like overheating. Are your laptop CPU's fan and heatsink clean and without dust? Perhaps it would be worth running some compressed air through to clean them up. Another test you could do would be to use another distribution's Live CD, without installing it on the hard drive. This would allow you to rule out (or confirm) problems ...


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