43

The whole X11 input stack is a mess. First of all, you don't need any special input method framework if you're just typing latin characters or multi-character compose sequences as defined by your XKB keyboard layout. Strictly speaking, any multi-key sequences, such as dead-keys, require a very simple input method. But they are provided by libx11/XKB and work ...


41

Those 'special' headphones or earphones which can be used on specialized devices to control media players, volume and mute usually have FOUR connections on the plug, versus the typical THREE a normal headphone output jack has. The usual three are Left Channel, Right Channel and Ground (common), while the fourth is often set up as a multi-value resistance, ...


14

I also had this same issue (Arch XFCE). Basically what happens is it switches input methods whenever you press Shift+Space, which frequently accidentally happens when typing. To fix this, you have to change or remove this hotkey: In a terminal window, type uim-pref-gtk, which is the settings for the UIM input method. Go to the Global key bindings 1 section. ...


13

Yes, there are at least this four (five?) ways: AltGr Make your keyboard layout English (international AltGr dead keys). Then the right Alt key is the AltGr key. Pressing AltGr-m will generate a µ. Many other keys also generate other characters: AltGr-s for ß, and Shift-AltGr-s for §. There is a separate keyboard layout for the console (the true consoles ...


12

Either you can enable an Compose key, or you can press CtrlShiftU followed by the Unicode hexadecimal number of the character (leading zeroes can be skipped). For example, Æ is CtrlShiftU, then C6. This works on GNOME Terminal, Terminator, Google Chrome and a number of other applications, with Xterm (and according to comments, Emacs) not working. On GNOME, ...


10

There are a methods to do this. After installing the keyboard configuration package: $ sudo yum install system-config-keyboard ... Installed: system-config-keyboard.x86_64 0:1.3.1-14.fc19 Dependency Installed: system-config-keyboard-base.x86_64 0:1.3.1-14.fc19 2 packages will get installed. Method #1 From here you can then invoke system-config-...


9

You can check checkboxes using Spacebar in most of the interfaces. I would rather write an answer than to close this question as off-topic (in which queue I found it), because there is nothing wrong in it.


8

That's typically what expect was written for: expect -c 'spawn -noecho vi; send "iHello World!\r\33"; interact' While expect was written for TCL in days prior to perl or python being popular, now similar modules for perl or python are also available. Another option is to issue TIOCSTI ioctls to your tty device to insert characters (one byte at a time) in ...


7

I did some research on this, and apparently the en vogue input system at the moment is IBus. It supports GTK+ and Qt. Here is what I did to set it up on a Debian system: Install ibus, ibus-gtk, ibus-qt4, and ibus-m17n. The latter contains the input method that supports entering Unicode characters by codepoint. There are several other packages that ...


7

The best way is still to type the character on your keyboard. Thanks to XKB, you can bind arbitrary Unicode characters to key combinations. For instance, with user XKB customization, I can type directly: ← → ↑ ↓ … € ½ « » — − ± ≠ ∩ ∪ ⊂ ∧ ∨ ∀ ∃ √ ∞ ≤ ≥, etc. Note: in the particular case of GNU Emacs, Unicode composition can be done via Ctrlx+8+Return. See ...


7

How to get the name of a key: Use the command xev and press the keys of interest. The name is shown as last word in the parenthesis. Particularly, what are the names for numpad + and −: xev tells me, that they are KP_Add and KP_Subtract.


5

Basically, this may be a problem of mismatch between your locale, which is set to UTF-8, and the encoding of your Chineses character file, which may be encoded in gbk, gb2312, gb18030, or Big-5. All those encoding listed above are incompatible with UTF-8. Now, let's assume gbk is the encoding of your file. So when you try to show the contents of the file, ...


5

I use Ratpoison WM. To type Chinese, I simply added IBUS to the ~/.ratpoisonrc file, which then starts IBUS when you start Ratpoison. The line looks like this: exec ibus-daemon --xim If you aren't using Ratpoison, arrange to launch ibus-daemon --xim when your X session start by whatever means your window manager or session manager provides. Then, to start ...


5

There is currently no standardized way to use your wired headset as input with Linux as far as i know. This means you won't be able to use your headset to control your music player - Bluetooth headsets on the other should work out of the box.


4

If you launch kde from xinit command , you could set the following environment variables in ~/.xinitrc , export GTK_IM_MODULE=ibus export XMODIFIERS=@im=ibus export QT_IM_MODULE=ibus This will make all programs respect ibus. (If this don't work for you , modify startkde4 script directly , add the 3 lines to the top of it , after #!/bin/sh And also a auto-...


4

The biggest difference is that most input systems are implemented server-client-wise, uim is just a library. Most users don't need an input method system at all or only need simple, table-based converters. Such users don't require or are unwilling to install a complex input method system, so we want to keep uim simple. See the Official Github Page for ...


4

If you enable your compose key, you can print this symbol with the compose/u sequence, like so: µ The full range of symbols available, and their respective key sequences, is documented on the Ubuntu wiki.


3

This is not an answer, but maybe it's an acceptable work-around: alias p='perl; echo hit control-d again; cat > /dev/null' Then, if your perl script exits prematurely, you'll harmlessly paste the remainder to /dev/null; if the perl script succeeds, you'll see your friendly reminder and hit control-d to exit the cat catcher.


3

It was my mistake that I created .Xcompose instead of .XCompose! (see question that every times mentions .Xcompose). Now all custom compose key sequences that are defined in ~/.XCompose are working well.


3

I am afraid I know of no application that does this. Developing one would probably require creating your own input method (to replace XIM). However, I can offer you an alternative that you may find far more helpful than simply changing the key layout. X (through XIM), for some time now, has offered a utility called XCompose. XCompose allows you to type “...


3

I figured it out eventually: yum install system-config-keyboard Run system-config-keyboard as root Select Norsk (aka Norwegian) Now the correct keyboard layout shows up in the Settings GUI.


3

You should be able to do it using XFCE's keyboard settings. Run this command from a terminal: xfce4-keyboard-settings This should open the keyboard settings window, go to the "Layout" tab and click "Add": Choose "Russian" in the window that appears If for some reason the above fails, you can always switch layouts using setxkbmap -layout ru


3

There are basically two ways: 1) On the kernel level, find the /dev/input device that produces your keypresses, open it and do a "grab"-ioctl (same as evtest --grab does). That will cause this input device to send the key events exclusively to your application. Then use /dev/uinput to create your own input device from your application, where you can send ...


3

There are three parts to this: How to encode tilde+bar+letter, and how to display it, and how to enter it. If you want to encode in Unicode, there are combining characters, in particular U+0303 COMBINING TILDE and U+0304 COMBINING MACRON. Both the wiktionary example and what you typed in the question after "I cannot copy the result" are actually encoded as ...


3

After some Google searching I found that my old method for input accented characters is known as dead keys, there are other methods like compose key; as it is suggested in this: [SOLVED] keyboard entry of "accented" characters - (thank you Nick ODell). After trying every possible solution I discovered that the input methods were not working on gedit, ...


3

Using input methods CIN-file input methods are usable in X11 and in my user-space virtual terminals. One of the commonly-collected ones, greek.cin, has the mu character. One simply enters m (lower case) and it is the only conversion. One can modify greek.cin to add micro, providing a second conversion, although visually it will be quite confusing, making ...


3

Because you are not using OS/2 I am not kidding. The OS/2 input handling code in less has a "special key" mapping for the ⎈ Control+← and ⎈ Control+→ chords to its internal SK_CTL_LEFT_ARROW and SK_CTL_RIGHT_ARROW events. The Unix code simply has no equivalent mapping. It relies upon termcap, and termcap is notoriously ...


2

You need ibus-anthy and ibus-unikey for those two languages so: yum install ibus-anthy ibus-unikey To set IBUS up follow these Fedora 17 guides (it should be pretty much the same thing in Fedora 18): japanese , vietnamese.


2

As described in detail in this post, there's a great way to do add unicode keys without having to remember any awkward key combinations or use any drop down menus. It boils down to using Autokey, which can take any set of key strokes as a trigger to run a script or paste a phrase. In this case, your phrase is simply the unicode character you want. As the ...


2

I tested this on Linux Mint 17.2 'Rafaela' Cinnamon 62-bit. Install the package ibus-m17n Select Keyboard Input Methods from the startmenu or which starts ibus-setup: Select sera m17n as a new Input Method and press Add. Close this dialog. Go to System Settings -> Language -> Input Method and check two things here: First input method must be set to IBUs, ...


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