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65

GNU Info was designed to offer documentation that was comprehensive, hyperlinked, and possible to output to multiple formats. Man pages were available, and they were great at providing printed output. However, they were designed such that each man page had a reasonably small set of content. A man page might have the discussion on a single C function such ...


41

The reason the Info system was invented is necessity, but I guess "laziness, hubris and impatience" is an equally good explanation. The point of the GNU project was to develop a freely modifiable and freely distributible operating system and tools. The traditional Unix man system was based on the nroff/troff document formatting system from Bell Labs, which ...


38

Use the following commands to get more details: cat /etc/*release* uname -a


31

help is a built-in command in the bash shell (and that shell only) that documents some of the builtin commands and keywords of that shell. That's an internal documentation system of that shell. Other shells have their own documentation system (ksh93 has --help and --man options for its builtins, zsh has a run-help helper that extracts information from ...


20

As the Wikipedia page says, TeXinfo was designed as the official documentation of the GNU project by Richard Stallman. It is a set of macros on top of TeX, and was designed for writing software manuals. I think Stallman considered man pages inadequate for the task. Two advantages Texinfo has over man pages is that it is hyperlinked, and second, that it is, ...


19

To answer your question with at least a hint of factual background I propose to start by looking at the timeline of creation of man, info and other documentation systems. The first man page was written in 1971 using troff (nroff was not around yet) in a time when working on a CRT based terminal was not common and printing of manual pages the norm. The man ...


13

Ah, info brings along the texi2ps and texi2pdf programs. So if you find the info source (info.texi) you can generate beautiful (or bloated, depending on your point of view) PDF using: texi2pdf info.texi


12

Yes, info has support for pretty much any key binding scheme you like; see http://www.gnu.org/software/texinfo/manual/info-stnd/html_node/Custom-Key-Bindings.html and note in particular the --vi-keys startup option for Info.


10

Posting as an answer, as requested. Just don't use info to browse info pages. There is a standalone info browser named pinfo, and Emacs has, of course, its own Info Mode. If you're using Vim you can also install the ref and ref-info plugins. ref is essentially a generic hypertext browser. It comes with plugins for a number of sources, such as man pages, ...


9

On Debian and its derivatives like Ubuntu, the info pages are not installed unless you install the corresponding package-doc package for a given package. So in your case: apt-get install tar-doc A notable exception (though that may only apply to Debian and not Ubuntu) is bash-doc. The textinfo bash documentation is not considered as free software by ...


9

You can calculate it yourself for your system with simple command $ find /usr/share/man/ -type f -exec ls -S {} + 2>/dev/null | head | while \ read -r file; do printf "%-40s" "$file"; \ man "$file" 2>/dev/null | wc -lwm; done | sort -nrk 4 which returns on my box (file) (lines) (words) (chars) /usr/share/man/...


9

To create Info documentation, you first need a texi file. .texi - Texinfo is a typesetting syntax used for generating documentation in both on-line and printed form (creating filetypes as dvi, html, pdf, etc., and its own hypertext format, info) with a single source file. It is implemented by a computer program released as free software of the same name, ...


7

From a practical view, info is the most detailed of three levels of reference documentation: The three levels are usually increasing in detail: --help as a common command option - a short usage summary, man - the classic man pages, a quick reference, and info - a more detailed, GNU-speciffic manual - the full, official documentation. If an info page is ...


7

Info files are created from .texinfo source, which is a special kind of markup language. The program used to convert .texinfo files to .info files is GNU TexInfo. This software can also produce HTML output: Texinfo uses a single source file to produce output in a number of formats, both online and printed (dvi, html, info, pdf, xml, etc.). This means ...


5

The arrow keys are the least meaingful way to navigate info documents; as well, the hjkl keys are the least meaningful ways to navigate with vim-style keybindings. Info uses emacs-style keybindings which aren't so bad once you figure them out. try info info to get started and then hit h to check out some of the keys. just the same, open a file with less ...


5

Sphinx can build into all of these format using special builders. The input format is UTF-8, so Chinese should be OK (I have only used French and Spanish non-ASCII characters).


4

Info is a specialized format with few formatting capabilities, it's basically man with hyperlinks. Most info files are generated from a Texinfo source with the makeinfo command. Texinfo is designed to accommodate a wide range of outputs, both hypertext and printed, with basic or pretty formatting. Supported output formats include info, HTML, DVI, PostScript ...


4

On my Ubuntu 12.04 system when I run the command info tar I actually get the man page for tar. You can see what file info is using with the -w switch. $ info -w tar *manpages* $ info -w ls /usr/share/info/coreutils.info.gz If you search the repos you'll find this: $ apt-cache search info|grep tar ... pax - Portable Archive Interchange (cpio, pax, tar) ...


4

You can use Control-V to scroll-forward-page-only, and the reverse Meta-V or Escape-V for scroll-backward-page-only. These are listed in the h help page, but they are hard to spot.


3

There's a list on Wikipedia, which includes the following: info pinfo tkman tkinfo (linked page also has a list of info viewers) khelpcenter emacs khelpcenter relies on info2html which could also be used to enable reading info files with any browser. However, the converted pages lack tons of useful features, like search and access to the index; even if, ...


3

1 - advanced, but lightweight technology Man pages are flat. info is a tree. Both remain text based, so they can be used during low level system development, (unlike http, which requires a full blown GUI and browser before you can use it.) This is also useful because linux can run on many low resource machines, for example, the stuff that runs on my ...


3

Info is a standalone program that mimics Emacs's built-in documentation interface. Emacs does not come from the unix world, and some of its key bindings are different from the traditional unix bindings. In particular, Ctrl+C is the back-to-toplevel key under unix, but under Emacs, that's Ctrl+G (which is also the bell character when it is emitted by the ...


3

A quick test with info here tells me that pressing Enter one time works.


3

I never ran it manually before, but install-info looks like what you want (if you guessed it has an info manual, you're right, info install-info — although there is a man page, too).


3

Use this Vim plugin: Vinfo To read Info documentation like Vim help-files


3

Use cat /proc/version Result: Linux version 3.14.27-100.fc19.x86_64 (mockbuild@bkernel02.phx2.fedoraproject.org) (gcc version 4.8.3 20140911 (Red Hat 4.8.3-7) (GCC) ) #1 SMP Wed Dec 17 19:36:34 UTC 2014 I believe this works for most distros, and provides a more concise answer than cat /etc/*release* and more complete answer than uname -a. However, use of ...


3

For what it's worth, KDE's Konqueror and Rekonq browsers can display info pages directly, by exposing them through the info: protocol. Simply launch Konqueror or Rekonq, and type e.g. "info:ls" in the address bar to access the info page for ls. man pages are supported in the same way, via the man: protocol.


3

Man pages are stored in /usr/share/man/manX where X is the section (described in man man). They're compressed in gzip format, so let's assume a larger compressed file means a bigger manpage. By checking in /usr/share/man/man1 (section 1: Executable programs or shell commands) with the command gzip -l *.gz | sort -n -k2, I get this (which will probably vary ...


3

The command info looks for files at places defined in $INFOPATH variable (usually /usr/share/info/, etc), but if it doesn't find the appropriate file there, as a fallback it switches to the man pages for help (see $MANPATH variable) and prints exactly the same content as man. So if info -w shows *manpages* then try man -w to get the information you wanted.


3

It sounds as if the operating system was installed without the non-free repo. Quite often, answers to questions like these are answered in the errata-type documentation located in /usr/share/doc. According to the package documentation in /usr/share/doc/info/README.Debian: This package does not contain the info documentation of info and texinfo, as they ...


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