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79

en_IE.UTF-8 English (Ireland) locale has all the things you're asking for: Measurements metric — yes 24-hour time format — yes Work week starts on Monday — yes Numeric date in (something at least resembling) ISO format, yyyy-mm-dd — no, it this locale it's dd/mm/yy. But that seems close enough to what you're used to Informal date is ...


12

(a) An entity known as the Unicode Common Locale Data Repository seems to be the place that handles locales. The glibc wiki indicates that they will follow CLDR. (b) They have a locale known as "en_150" which seems to be intended to do what you want. I'm not sure glibc has implemented it yet. There's also a similar locale known as en_BE which is identical ...


10

Yes, usually that is the case, as those messages are provided by the kernel itself, and including a hundred translations into the kernel image itself would serve no purpose other than increasing the kernel size dramatically. For many things there are front-ends, user space programs which read the kernel info and present it in a translated fashion.


10

There are a methods to do this. After installing the keyboard configuration package: $ sudo yum install system-config-keyboard ... Installed: system-config-keyboard.x86_64 0:1.3.1-14.fc19 Dependency Installed: system-config-keyboard-base.x86_64 0:1.3.1-14.fc19 2 packages will get installed. Method #1 From here you can then invoke system-config-...


9

The en_DK locale doesn't really have anything to do with Denmark except for its name. It was originally created by someone who wanted the same thing as requested here - a reasonable set of defaults for an English speaker in Europe. The name "en_DK" is sort of a joke - all locale names at that time were composed of a language code and a country code (there ...


6

After trying many solutions that did not work for me, here's something that just worked fine. sudo apt-get install chromium-browser-l10n


5

It seems ko_KR.utf8 works, try LC_COLLATE=ko_KR.utf8 sort file How have I found this? for loc in $(locale -a); do echo ____"${loc}"____; LC_COLLATE="$loc" sort file; done | pcregrep -MC1 'wa\nAl (\n|[^_])*Günter Rohrbach\nG'


5

This behavior is caused by a known bug in poppler (reported at least here and here) related to unicode characters. There is no fix at the moment, you just have to follow the bug tracker.


4

This is why you use different locale for different things. In my case I mix en_GB and sv_SE to get what I need and it looks like this: $> locale LANG=en_GB.UTF-8 LANGUAGE=en_GB:en LC_CTYPE="en_GB.UTF-8" LC_NUMERIC=sv_SE.utf8 LC_TIME=sv_SE.utf8 LC_COLLATE="en_GB.UTF-8" LC_MONETARY=sv_SE.utf8 LC_MESSAGES="en_GB.UTF-8" LC_PAPER=sv_SE.utf8 LC_NAME=sv_SE.UTF-...


3

I found the source code for dspcat.c: http://www.smart.net/~rlhamil/. Specifically in this tarball. I tried compiling it and was missing a variable: $ make cc -O -DSOLARIS dspcat.c -o dspcat dspcat.c: In function ‘format_msg’: dspcat.c:11:23: error: ‘NL_TEXTMAX’ undeclared (first use in this function) static char result[NL_TEXTMAX*2+1]; ...


3

you can't change some language setting and your script's echo commands will magically be another language. you can do one of the following: source a language file. create a bash script that converts the original bash script. create a function in the bash script that translates the output. As you're not keen on the dict solution as it's too google ...


3

I wouldn't expect English strings to necessarily be positioned before all other strings after sorting. I'd rather expect that strings are first sorted by language order ("david" before "mario") and then either by Unicode code point number ("programmer's sort", corresponding to LC_ALL=C) or simply left in place (since the other strings are not English). From ...


3

http://dev.mutt.org/trac/wiki/MuttFaq/Charset You have to decide on a locale and a character set. For a list of locales and their corresponding character sets, see /usr/share/locale/ on OpenBSD. There is no mix-and-matching between languages and charsets, apart from what's in that directory. However, the language and charset are controlled by LANG and ...


3

I figured it out eventually: yum install system-config-keyboard Run system-config-keyboard as root Select Norsk (aka Norwegian) Now the correct keyboard layout shows up in the Settings GUI.


3

proc virtual filesystem has two part: 1. /proc/[PID]/blahblah 2. /proc/* #versus of no.1 such as cpuinfo meminfo partitions and so on. May be you will be see another locale in content of /proc/[PID]/files , because some of them such as environ fill up by user, so may be you can see another locale.But in part no2 or some of part no1 never you don't see ...


3

Actually, I believe there is a locale that fits your requirements better than en_IE. It's unofficial, but it is en_SE.UTF-8. That is a link which points to the locale file. It basically copies sv-SE, which should get you everything you want (though I haven't double-checked), but gives you English system messages, menus, etc. I have used it before and it has ...


2

X login is annoyingly inconsistent about which startup file names are used. On the system I'm using you would just need to modify $HOME/.xsessionrc. But it does vary. I generally put my environment variable settings in a separate file and source that from .profile and .xsessionrc. If .xsessionrc does not work for you, check the documentation or read ...


2

You will need the translation files installed. On an Ubuntu system, Italian support is added by running: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install language-pack-it-base language-pack-it manpages-it I think on Red Hat and Fedora, it's something like yum groupinstall italian-support You will also need to use one of the supported locale names, which you can ...


2

locale-gen is a (not very well written) bash script. That error is reported by: is_entry_ok() { if [ -n "$locale" -a -n "$charset" ] ; then true else echo "error: Bad entry '$locale $charset'" false fi } So, here the problem is that $charset is empty. The list of locales to generate is compiled from /etc/locale.gen and all the files in /...


2

You can use the $"…" syntax to specify a string that is to be translated according to the locale. The translations must be in a message catalog file; see the bash manual for where this file is located and the Glibc manual for the format of the file. Of course, you (or somebody else) will have to supply the translation for each string. There's no way to ...


1

The SI 1452 keyboard layout variant has been adopted as the default layout for Hebrew, so one should be able to type Hebrew characters without changing the layout - but not the way OP is used to. To type Niqqud, one has to hold down the AltGr key, which is the "Third Level" modifier key, when pressing the appropriate key. Some of these keys correspond to ...


1

Edit: This workaround is probably not the best solution; but it does work. Based on @StephaneChazelas' answer, I figured out the problem is with /var/lib/locales/supported.d/mintlocale - a file specific to my distribution, Linux Mint. It is mis-generated, without charset fields for most (not all) of the lines, e.g.: en_GB en_GB.iso88591 en_GB.UTF-8 UTF-8 (...


1

Centos 7 (on my test virt, and presumably also Centos 6) tend to set UTF-8 by default, unless you told the installer otherwise, or reconfigured the system for some other encoding. /root/anaconda-ks.cfg may indicate what language was set by the install: # echo -e '\xe9' | iconv -f iso-8859-1 -t UTF-8 é # locale ... (bunch of UTF-8 things here) ... # grep ...


1

You can execute export LC_ALL=C before zypper ..... For instance: # export LC_ALL=C # zypper dup Warning: You are about to do a distribution upgrade with all enabled repositories. Make sure these repositories are compatible before you continue. See 'man zypper' for more information about this command. Loading repository data... Reading installed packages....


1

It seems like gettext is the best solution however if you really don't want to use it maybe something like this would suffice? Assuming your bash supports arrays. #!/bin/bash greeting=("Hello World" "Hola Mundo") goodbye=("Done" "Terminado") test "${LANG:0:2}" == "en" eng=$? echo ${greeting[${eng}]} sudo blablabla echo ${goodbye[${eng}]}


1

I guess this has something to do with a font. In text mode different fonts are used than in X. Doing a simple googling says that it might be not possible to achieve in text mode Arch Linux forum and LFS Console


1

I think you're slightly off on the name of your locale. Try export LANG=zh_CN or export LANG=zh_CN.utf8. To find out list of valid locales look in /usr/share/locales.


1

I use en_IE@euro ISO-8859-15 $ export LC_MONETARY= "en_IE@euro ISO-8859-15" ... but I'm not exactly sure about measurements, considering using nl_NL.UTF-8 or nl_BE.UTF-8, the only issue I have with that is once I allow for such a library other apps might end up using it as reference for local lib and again start to download apps and service in dutch or ...


1

I think you are missing having LESSCHARSET=utf-8 in your environment. At least on my FreeBSD host using this setting allows me to view the manual pages in the right way.


1

The Euro symbol (€) is Unicode character U+20AC, so at least one of the following should work: Press and hold Shift+Ctrl while you type U20A and C (and then release Shift and Ctrl). Type Shift+Ctrl+U (i.e., press and hold Shift+Ctrl while you type U, and then release Shift and Ctrl), then type 20A and C, and then press and release Shift+Ctrl.


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