12

Try installing the zsh-completions formula. $ brew info zsh-completions zsh-completions: stable 0.10.0, HEAD https://github.com/zsh-users/zsh-completions Not installed From: https://github.com/Homebrew/homebrew/commits/master/Library/Formula/zsh-completions.rb ==> Caveats To activate these completions, add the following to your .zshrc: fpath=(/usr/...


7

As mentioned in another question, if installing GNU sed using Homebrew with --with-default-names, then it is installed as /usr/local/bin/sed. Without --with-default-names, it will be installed as /usr/local/bin/gsed. If installed as sed, then it depends on your $PATH what sed binary gets picked up when you execute sed. If your $PATH is as you have ...


5

Process substitution1 lets you transform a script typescript as it's written. You can use script -q >(./dewtell >>outfile) brew args... instead of script -aq outfile brew args... to write a log with escape sequences removed, where ./dewtell is whatever command runs the script that removes them. On other systems than relatively recent versions of ...


4

From chsh manual: When altering a login shell, and not the super-user, the user may not change from a non-standard shell or to a non-standard shell. Non-standard is defined as a shell not found in /etc/shells. So you need either to run chsh as root (sudo chsh -s /usr/local/bin/bash user), either to add /usr/local/bin/bash to /etc/shells (sudo echo /usr/...


4

The configure script fails because it can't find the gettext tools in the current $PATH. These tools include xgettext, msgfmt and other binaries. On macOS with Homebrew, the gettext Homebrew package does actually install these binaries, but they are located in the /usr/local/Cellar/gettext/0.18.1.1/bin directory rather than directly in /usr/local/bin. The ...


4

Homebrew provides it's own completion. You just need to link the file $(brew --prefix)/Library/Contributions/brew_zsh_completion.zsh to _brew somewhere in your $fpath.(See comment at the start of https://github.com/Homebrew/homebrew/blob/master/Library/Contributions/brew_zsh_completion.zsh) zsh-completions recently removed its _brew completion in favour of ...


3

Let's start with some "history". /usr/local is typically used to store user programs/data that were not installed with the base operating system. Commonly, when you make programs from source using automake, they will install somewhere under /usr/local. Because the main operating system itself doesn't rely on this directory, permissions are really up to the ...


3

If your mysql client is built with readline, you can do this using the auto-rehash feature. These are possible solutions: command-line option --auto-rehash command (in mysql), type rehash configuration file called .my.cnf in your home directory, containing: [mysql] auto-rehash Further reading: Autocompletion in the MySQL command-line client MySQL tab ...


3

You can see install options with brew options nginx : --with-debug Compile with support for debug log --with-gunzip Compile with support for gunzip module --with-http2 Compile with support for the HTTP/2 module --with-passenger Compile with support for Phusion Passenger module --with-webdav Compile with support for WebDAV module --devel Install development ...


3

On recent versions of OS X, pf is installed and running by default. The linked question is referring to changing the pf configuration, not installing a new utility. Modifying a firewall on a production system is not something which should be done without reading the documentation (man pf.conf , man pfctl). To add that block line (or experiment with other ...


3

The pdfinfo command line tool is part of the xpdf package: brew install xpdf This package installs many things, including pdfinfo.


3

You're not doing things right. A formula is forbidden to install binaries, or what ever, into /usr/local/bin directly. As a formula, it should installed all of its content into a path like /usr/local/Celler/<formula-name>/<version>, which is called a prefix path and represented by #{prefix} in ruby. Homebrew will symlink the binary from ...


2

Oh-my-ZSH config file should have a line starting with plugins=, like this: plugins=(git gitignore autojump jira command-not-found zsh-syntax-highlighting) Whatever you put there is considered by ZSH to be an active plugin. In case of AutoJump, oh-my-ZSH Plugin Wiki states that: Enables autojump if installed with homebrew, macports or debian/ubuntu ...


2

Obviously, something overwrote the $USER variable. You can either spend hours trying to retrace what could have caused this, or run the following commands in order. export USER=`whoami` bash -x -c ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)" If it happens again, the -x flag will show you what commands were run ...


2

For a Python 3.5 install the corresponding pip (which should get automatically installed), is pip3.5. So you should be able to use it by just that command. (If that doesn't work try /usr/local/bin/pip3.5 or /usr/local/bin/pip`, but the latter would IMO be an error in the packaging) In most multi version Python installations you can get the specific minor ...


2

I don't know about homebrew in particular, but in theory you could use sudo to install software. Then files are accessed with root privileges, which may or may not be what you want. In general though, if you want multiple unprivileged users to be able to write to the same location, it isn't the owner of that location that you want to change, but its group. ...


2

If I want the latest version (or if no package is available), I do compile the source code myself. There's really no alternative to comipling if you want the latest version -- all packages have some lag compared to the current repository, and there is software that is only on github etc. and hasn't made it into a package yet. I install compiled packages ...


2

Many Linux (and BSD) versions have their own package managers built in and do not require you to touch the source files or use PPA files. For example, with Linux Mint there is the "Software Manager" which has tens of thousands of applications that can be installed with a few clicks. I have used PPA's for a few programs, but were possible I use the Software ...


2

The consequence might not be exactly the same, but adding --HEAD flag on the command worked like a charm. brew uninstall --force vim brew install --HEAD -s vim --with-luajit And now the vim is installed with Lua support.


2

You're right that assigning the LC_* shell variables does cause bash to call POSIX setlocale() for the corresponding category with the value of the variable whether they're exported or not. For LANG, it calls setlocale(LC_ALL, thevalue) followed setlocale(LC_*) again for all the LC_* variable. For LANGUAGE, it doesn't do anything. Now, bash is the shell of ...


2

Manage to find it in ~/.cache/Homebrew/Logs $ ls .cache/Homebrew/Logs/ app-engine-python curl gettext ncurses python bazel expat git openssl python@2 binutils gcc glibc percona-server youtube-dl bison gdbm mariadb pkg-config


1

I searched: ❯ brew search webkitgtk webkitgtk was deleted from homebrew/core in commit cc9be4ac: webkitgtk: migrate to boneyard Repeatedly breaks/causes issues & consequently sits there stuck on versions with publicly-known CVEs frequently. Closes https://github.com/Homebrew/homebrew-core/issues/9053. To show the formula before removal run: ...


1

Looks like brew supports JSON output, so the following command would do it. brew info --json=v1 --installed | jq -r '.[] | if .installed[0].poured_from_bottle then .name else empty end'


1

Tab completion for tables and columns works only when you are connected or using a database that has such tables. When you run mysql and connect to a sever, unless you have specified on the command line (or via cnf files) the database to connect to, you can see only the mysql system tables. Simply execute use mydatabase; to allow all the tables in mydatabase ...


1

You could run "brew doctor", but it probably would be better to uninstall and reinstall it.


1

You should find the newly installed vim in the bin directory under the homebrew prefix: echo `brew --prefix`/bin/vim Certainly brew info vim will tell you what cellar brew installed vim into. Since I haven't installed vim using homebrew, let me show you an example using wget: benlavery@Talantinc:~ $>brew info wget wget: stable 1.16.3, HEAD Internet ...


1

Linuxbrew requires Ruby 1.8.6 or newer. Ruby 1.8.6 is the version where the RUBY_PATCHLEVEL constant was defined, as well as other features that Linuxbrew needs anyway. Ruby 1.8.6 came out in March 2007, so this shouldn't be a very onerous requirement. If you have a very old system (CentOS 5?) you'll need to install a more recent version of Ruby. RVM is an ...


1

The homebrew/x11 was deprecated. xpdf is enough to work: $ brew install xpdf Or we can check the package before installing by: $ brew search xpdf ==> Searching local taps... xpdf


1

this will install an app not a shell command ==> Downloading http://www.sybrex.com/download/macgui/files/pdfinfo/PDFInfo.dmg ################################################################## 100.0% ==> Symlinking App 'PDFInfo.app' to '/Users/XYZ/Applications/PDFInfo.app' 🍺 pdfinfo staged at '/opt/homebrew-cask/Caskroom/pdfinfo/latest' (10 ...


1

Open Disk Utility by entering "Disk Utility" in spotlight and waiting for Disk Utility to appear, or by opening it through any other means. In Disk Utility, select the OS partition on your internal drive1 and click the Repair Disk Permissions button. Footnotes: Typically called "Macintosh HD" and "Internal Drive", respectively.


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