172

Since you don't mention, I'm assuming this is on Linux. dmidecode -t memory dmidecode -t 16 lshw -class memory


144

lsblk will list all block devices. It lends itself well to scripting: $ lsblk -io KNAME,TYPE,SIZE,MODEL KNAME TYPE SIZE MODEL sda disk 149.1G TOSHIBA MK1637GS sda1 part 23.3G sda2 part 28G sda3 part 93.6G sda4 part 4.3G sr0 rom 1024M CD/DVDW TS-L632M lsblk is present in util-linux package and is thus far more universal than proposed ...


112

using the dmidecode | grep -A3 '^System Information' command. There you'll find all information from BIOS and hardware. These are examples on three different machines (this is an excerpt of the complete output): System Information Manufacturer: Dell Inc. Product Name: Precision M4700 System Information Manufacturer: MICRO-STAR INTERANTIONAL CO.,...


101

Laptop batteries typically have onboard firmware to control safe charging & discharging of the battery, report battery charge level to the OS, and prevent thermal runaway, which is what will cause an Li-ion battery to explode (or more accurately, catch fire). Most modern ones also contain mechanical failsafes to prevent such fires & explosions. This ...


53

Another solution which does not require root privileges: udevadm info --query=all --name=/dev/sda | grep ID_SERIAL This is actually the library that lsblk, mentioned by don_crissti, leverages, but my version of lsblk does not include the option for serial.


53

You can find out a system's default page size by querying its configuration via the getconf command: $ getconf PAGE_SIZE 4096 or $ getconf PAGESIZE 4096 NOTE: The above units are typically in bytes, so the 4096 equates to 4096 bytes or 4kB. This is hardwired in the Linux kernel's source here: Example $ more /usr/src/kernels/3.13.9-100.fc19.x86_64/...


50

In terminal type: # hdparm -I /dev/sd? | grep 'Serial\ Number' EDIT: You can also use lshw or smartctl lshw # lshw -class disk smartctl # smartctl -i /dev/sda If you are missing those tools, just install following packages # apt-get install hdparm # apt-get install smartmontools # apt-get install lshw


38

I've just gone through a hell of a time trying to get my discrete graphics to work in Ubuntu and answering this questions was constantly a challenge, since the lspci method mentioned earlier can sometimes say that both are [VGA controller] I think the following command should give you an indication of your active chip: $ glxinfo|egrep "OpenGL vendor|OpenGL ...


36

I can address your question, having previously worked with the Linux FB. How Linux Does Its FB. First you need to have FrameBuffer support in your kernel, corresponding to your hardware. Most modern distributions have support via kernel modules. It does not matter if your distro comes preconfigured with a boot logo, I don't use one and have FB support. ...


33

The words “CPU”, “processor” and “core” are used in somewhat confusing ways. They refer to the processor architecture. A core is the smallest independent unit that implements a general-purpose processor; a processor is an assemblage of cores (on some ARM systems, a processor is an assemblage of clusters which themselves are assemblages of cores). A chip can ...


32

Try sudo dmidecode -t baseboard for full information on the DMI table contents relevant to your baseboard, in a human readable form. For just the System Product Name, you can use either (type dmidecode -s to get a list of strings keywords): sudo dmidecode -s system-product-name sudo dmidecode -s baseboard-product-name Other relevant options for motherboard ...


30

Let's make it easy for the not so shell-savvy users: sudo dmidecode -t memory | grep -i size The output on my laptop would be: Size: 2048 MB Size: 1024 MB ...showing that I have one 1GB module and one 2GB module installed.


30

Device1 name and corresponding serial number: lsblk --nodeps -o name,serial output: NAME SERIAL sda 0000000012400917BA30 sdb 0000000012400917BA96 add -n if you don't want to print the header line: lsblk --nodeps -no name,serial output: sda 0000000012400917BA30 sdb 0000000012400917BA96 Pass device as argument to get only the serial number of a ...


26

hwinfo helps: > hwinfo --disk 21: IDE 00.0: 10600 Disk [Created at block.245] Unique ID: 3OOL.8MZXfAWnuH8 Parent ID: w7Y8.1T_0outZkp6 SysFS ID: /class/block/sda SysFS BusID: 0:0:0:0 SysFS Device Link: /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1f.2/host0/target0:0:0/0:0:0:0 Hardware Class: disk Model: "Hitachi HTS54322" Vendor: "...


26

I think all batteries can explode. The question is if Linux (an operating system using the Linux kernel) will generate more heat or not. With good use of the fan (equally good use of the fan as other operating systems might employ), the cooling should be equal or better, thus resulting in a similar (or perhaps even reduced) risk of battery explosion. There ...


25

Check out this How do I detect the RAM memory chip specification from within a Linux machine question. This tool might help: http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/check-ram-speed-linux/ $ sudo dmidecode --type 17 | more Sample output: # dmidecode 2.9 SMBIOS 2.4 present. Handle 0x0018, DMI type 17, 27 bytes Memory Device Array Handle: 0x0017 Error ...


24

If you want the OS to totally ignore it, you need to make a memory hole using "memmap." See this reference. For example, if you want 512M at the 2GB barrier, you can put "memmap=512M$2G" on your kernel command line. You will need to check your dmesg to find a contiguous hole to steal so you don't stomp on any devices; that is specific to your motherboard+...


24

For the record, much of this information is available under /sys/devices/virtual/dmi/id on modern Linuces (ie, since at least 2011), and much if it- notably, not including serial numbers- is readable by regular users. To answer the original poster's question, product_name is the file that contains the system's model name. bios_date bios_vendor bios_version ...


23

What you're asking for is called DMA. You need to write a driver to reserve this memory. Yes, I realize you said you didn't want the OS to intervene, and a driver becomes part of the OS, but in absence of a driver's reservation, the kernel believes all memory belongs to it. (Unless you tell the kernel to ignore the memory block, per Aaron's answer, that is.)...


23

Firstly, please note that the CPUID is definitely not a commonly accessible uniquely identifying marker for any system later than an Intel Pentium III. While hashing it with MAC addresses may lead to unique markers certainly, this is due only to the unique qualities of the MACs themselves and the CPUID in that case is nothing more than circumstantial. ...


23

Changing the priority of a process only determines how often this process will run when other processes are competing for CPU time. It has no impact when the process is the only one using CPU time. A minimum-priority process on an otherwise idle system gets 100% CPU time, same as a maximum-priority process. So you can run your game with a higher priority, ...


22

I can give at least a few details, even though I cannot fully explain what happens. As described for example here, the CPU communicates with the PCIe bus controller by transaction layer packets (TLPs). The hardware detects when there are faulty ones, and the Linux kernel reports that as messages. The kernel option pci=nommconf disables Memory-Mapped PCI ...


21

How about these two: $ sudo dmidecode -t 4 | grep ID | sed 's/.*ID://;s/ //g' 52060201FBFBEBBF $ ifconfig | grep eth1 | awk '{print $NF}' | sed 's/://g' 0126c9da2c38 You can then combine and hash them with: $ echo $(sudo dmidecode -t 4 | grep ID | sed 's/.*ID://;s/ //g') \ $(ifconfig | grep eth1 | awk '{print $NF}' | sed 's/://g') | sha256sum ...


21

If you have lshw installed: $ sudo lshw -C memory Example $ sudo lshw -C memory ... *-cache:0 description: L1 cache physical id: a slot: Internal L1 Cache size: 32KiB capacity: 32KiB capabilities: asynchronous internal write-through data *-cache:1 description: L2 cache physical id: b slot: ...


21

Any system emulator which emulates a system containing a MMU effectively emulates a MMU in software, so the answer to your question as stated is “yes”. However, virtual memory requires some way of enforcing memory access control, or at least address translation, so it needs either full software emulation of the CPU running the software being controlled, or ...


19

In your first example, what I think you are referring to is the "Media Wearout Indicator" on Intel drives, which is attribute 233. Yes, it has a range of 0-100, with 100 being a brand new, unused drive, and 0 being completely worn out. According to your ouptut, this field doesn't seem to exist. In your second example, please read the official docs about ...


19

Many modern distributions ship a file /etc/machine-id containing a most probably unique hexadecimal 32-character string. It originates from systemd, where a manpage has more information, and may be appropriate for your purpose.


18

lscpu If you care only about the sizes, try lscpu from util-linux. Example $ lscpu Architecture: x86_64 CPU op-mode(s): 32-bit, 64-bit Byte Order: Little Endian CPU(s): 4 On-line CPU(s) list: 0-3 Thread(s) per core: 2 Core(s) per socket: 2 Socket(s): 1 NUMA node(s): 1 Vendor ID: ...


18

If you run iw list, look for the lines specifying VHT. VHT Capabilities (0x038071a0): Max MPDU length: 3895 Supported Channel Width: neither 160 nor 80+80 short GI (80 MHz) TX STBC SU Beamformee VHT RX MCS set: 1 streams: MCS 0-9 2 streams: MCS 0-9 3 streams: not supported 4 ...


18

The clearest post I’ve seen on this issue is Matthew Garrett’s (including the comments). Matthew has now released a tool to check your system locally: build it, run it with sudo ./mei-amt-check and it will report whether AMT is enabled and provisioned, and if it is, the firmware versions (see below). The README has more details. To scan your network for ...


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