22

Any system emulator which emulates a system containing a MMU effectively emulates a MMU in software, so the answer to your question as stated is “yes”. However, virtual memory requires some way of enforcing memory access control, or at least address translation, so it needs either full software emulation of the CPU running the software being controlled, or ...


11

In short: no. To go further, a driver is a piece of software that interact with the kernel of the operating system. When you're working in kernel world, interoperability doesn't exist. POSIX neither. Everything is totally OS-specific: the architecture, the sub-systems and the way they have been built and designed, the standard library offered by the kernel ...


7

XFCE has some support for HiDPI - you can change the setting across all monitors for HiDPI, but it doesn't vary between different screens in the way that it does on a Retina MacBook Pro. I'm using XFCE and Arch Linux on a Lenovo W540 with the high DPI display. Apart from Chrome not supporting HiDPI, things work well.


7

It depends on exactly what you call virtual memory. An interesting model is the old Win16 model (best known from the old Windows 3.x, not Windows NT). In that model, you had GlobalLock and GlobalUnlock, LocalLock and LocalUnlock functions. These were a form of cooperative, manual management of virtual memory. As this was done in (application) software, it ...


7

It's not necessary to have a hardware MMU, if you have software that can swap processes to and from the physical memory. This was the mode of operation of early multi-tasking operating systems. Only one process is resident in memory at any given time, it is swapped out in its entirety when its time-slice expires (you can see that this becomes problematic ...


6

The first stop is your distribution bug tracker, from there on you will be guided to the next step. It is said that (unless you are able to reproduce the same bug in any distribution or that if you compile from sources and you are able to reproduce it in several systems) you should report downstream (i.e. at your distribution). In doubt always report to ...


4

286 protected mode (PM) is fundamentally different to what the 386 offers. Think of the 286 PM as a prototype, which had so many shortcomings that almost nobody ever used it, and the whole thing was completely redesigned from the ground up for the 386. It did not use a flat memory model, it used a segmented model like real mode, which meant you had to jump ...


4

I've recently installed ArchLinux + GNOME 3 on the ThinkPad Helix 2, and mostly everything works out of the box. My biggest remaining issue is suspend; a bug report has been filed to fix it but they're still seeking more information. (So perhaps trying it yourself will help! ;)) The pen works wonderfully, palm rejection is perfect in Xournal. A few things ...


4

There’s no way to map stepping numbers to stepping names using only information from the CPU. You need to look at specification updates from Intel; these contain descriptions of the errata fixed in various revisions of CPUs, and also contain identification information allowing the various steppings to be identified (where appropriate). For example, for your ...


3

This keyboard doesn't work properly on Linux. The entire keyboard freezes if you press any macro key. To be more precise, a kernel issue is currently in progress[1], and a userpace driver is available with some limitations[2]. [1] Bug 79251 - Keyboard status indicators not functioning properly. [2] K70/K95 RGB (Unofficial) Linux Driver


3

Graphics Analysis HD 4K Support in Kernel 3.10 and UP Device contains Code-Name IVY BRIDGE Intel HD 4K Graphics Chip. IVY Bridge should fall under the MESA DRI on LKDB. Support Options: FOSS MESA DRI Driver or Official Intel i965 Driver. Wireless Analysis MBM Ericson Chipset Support Unsure if this is within the LKDB, but packages exist here.


3

Depends on the software you use. Most support some level of 3D now - VMware Workstation and VirtualBox both do to some extent. as an aside I have a HD7790 at home and it works fine under Ubuntu 13.04. Use either the open source radeon driver OR get the newest from AMD's website though. The one that comes with Ubuntu is too old to properly recognize the ...


3

The 80386 supports paging in addition to memory segmentation while the 286 supports only memory segmentation. Linux heavily depends on paging support i.e., uses a flat memory scheme which basically sets all the segment registers to 0 and uses paging to manage applications. In order to port Linux to the 286, the fundamental memory manager needs a complete ...


3

I would give Ubuntu a try, you can test drive it with the live CD before committing to it (ie installing it). The advantage of Ubuntu is that it's very good at detecting the host hardware and configuring itself and you would get a complete system. FWIW, I have Ubuntu running on an older netbook inside a Virtual Machine and it's workable so it's not that ...


3

I think the real answer to my question is this: Every major CPU architecture (or major revision thereof) requires some assembly support code in addition to the C code. Even if you got GCC to compile the Linux kernel into 16-bit 286 machine code, there would still be missing the essential 16-bit 286 compatible assembly code. In other words, the kernel ...


3

There are parts in the kernel written in assembly and they would have to be rewritten to support 286. Regarding ELKS, in their FAQ they indicate it's a subset of the Linux kernel, so perhaps they ported only the absolute necessities.


3

Okay, for some reason my motherboard doesn't come with the XHCI support enabled by default. So if anyone is experiencing a similar issue just go and check if XHCI is enabled in the bios.


3

There's a good chance it will work, particularly if both have the same OS and CPU. I believe there can be difference between Intel and AMD CPUs, and if you have different versions of CPUs, like Red Lake, and KB Lake the chances of it working decrease. If you're running Windows, the chances of it working become quite low, since Windows logs the hardware ...


2

Does Linux require hardware VM86 support? I'm not an assembly guy, but according to this: As the original implementation of the 32-bit extension of the 8086 architecture, the 80386 instruction set, programming model, and binary encodings are still the common denominator for all 32-bit x86 processors, this is termed x86, IA-32, or i386-architecture, ...


2

Gluglug and other RYF vendors sell laptops running LibreBoot, a free software, microcode-free bios replacement. LibreBoot supports hardware on which it is possible to remove the Intel Management Engine, a small proprietary operating system on modern Intel machines that has been the attack vector of major security exploits. There is some initial work toward ...


2

The biggest reason is that the original GNU project aimed itself at 32-bit machines (like mid-1980s Unix workstatons) rather than bothering to support anything smaller, so the whole GNU toolchain was unsuitable for 16-bit code generation. Porting the early, assembly-heavy, segments-using Linux kernel to the 286 would have been easier than any other porting ...


2

Load the snd-usb-audio module. If it follows USB audio standards then ALSA will see it, and it will work.


2

Not unless you're willing to replace the BIOS. IBMs are usually considered "corporate" machines and this restriction is a "feature" so that you as a user can not install an unsecured or untested Wi-Fi card and bring down your corporate network. Even in the "home" space, it is still considered a "security feature". This is a design decision by IBM and there'...


2

Short answer: Yes, but I'm lying. Long answer: ultimately what you need to support some hardware is driver. Some drivers aren't open source, which makes it harder for them to be fixed, updated and adapted to changes. Some drivers are also compiled in kernel, so you might need to recompile your kernel if you wish to use these (rather exotic) features. ...


2

Partial answer: Making sense of the HID infrastructure and the HID raw data (Disclaimer: I've only done all this for USB, but I suppose it will apply in the same or a similar way to Bluetooth). HID devices can send and receive reports in a well-defined format. The format for a particular device is given by the HID descriptor, which for USB is very similar ...


2

With help from the hints above a was able to create a patch that makes the Fn key work when the Apple Magic Keyboard is connected via bluetooth. Part of the problem was that the Magic Keyboard shows up with vendor id 0x004c (bluetooth vendor id for Apple) and hid-apple only looks for 0x05ac (Apple USB vendor id) so the hid-generic module was used instead of ...


2

There are two issues firstly in that the availability of Linux compatible devices is perceived to be less than it actually is, and hardware vendors may in an anticompetitive spirit not be helpful. The first is actually the more common. Let's say that Billy Bob's Air Freight and Catering decides to make a wireless card. They grab some standard chips, an ...


2

If your just want a Linux distribution for learning shell scripting, I would wholeheartedly recommend installing Linux in a virtual machine. Use something like, for example, VirtualBox. This way, you will have the ability to seamlessly switch between your Linux shell and your more familiar Window environment and you would be able to test out different ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible