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The blocksize to dd just asks it to read/write in chunks of that size. It used to be relevant to write in disk-sector size chunks for performance, given today's disk and much smarter operating system handling of I/O, it makes little (if any) difference.


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The bs given to dd just tells how large the buffer should be during creating the file. In the end, the file consists of nothing but zero-bytes, there is no information about alignment. You have to use the specific parameter to fdisk, which is -b, as per the man-page of fdisk(8): -b, --sector-size sectorsize Specify the sector size of the ...


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It's not possible to do it the way you describe. Sector size is a block device property which files don't inherently have. A file is just a sequence of a certain number of bytes, how those are stored is an implementation detail... So if you want a specific sector size, you need a block device. And Linux offers loop devices just for this purpose, so use ...


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Preamble: take it as a prototype, just an example to promote discussion. I modified a Perl script that I use to make faster md5sum for huge files (>TB), and made a (really rough) bash script to perform some operation an then recall it. The basic idea behind this is: Wipe disk partition table Create single partition spanning all disk and format it Mount ...


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I would not suggest "wiping" Hard Drives (especially SSDs) by writing blocks via dd to the drive. Instead, I would use the ATA Secure Erase Command (if supported by the drive). See Kernel.org Wiki - ATA Secure Erase for further details.


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My try to understand "real-world" speeds and throughput is fio Based on simple configuration file you can create different ".fio" files to test what best suits to your needs (take a look at the docs). Just to add my scenario: I used it a lot in the past to find best disk/filesystem tuning for large backups performance (>4TB) with complex incremental/...


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I finally installed the disk as the main disk of a laptop, ran an Ubuntu installation disk and it made it. It could be listed and formatted. I will probably never know why but the problem is solved.


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I found the problem. It wasn't because the hard drive wasn't mounted properly or it shut down, but because of the fdisk command. Since the script was executed with a cronjob and no user is logged in, fdisk does not return any output, so the variable always remains empty. I now simply test if the file sdb1 or sdc1 is in the /dev folder and bypass the fdisk ...


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Your CPU has a theoretical peak capacity of 5GT/s to its memory controller, and up to 25.6GBps to memory, so it should be able to generate 10Gbps of traffic. However, your laptop won’t have a 10Gbps NIC, and your hard drive uses a connection capped at 6Gbps (and is undoubtedly far slower than that, since it’s a disk spinning at 5400rpm). So you can’t read ...


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Anyone interested, I posted the same question on the Linux Mint forum and received some answers: https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=310519&p=1751219#p1751219


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I have had a good experience using F2FS as opposed to XFS or ext4 on SMR drives. My ext4 exhibited similar behaviour to what you described above on my SMR drives and forced me to investigate SMR solutions in Linux. I also experienced the timeout issues you describe. I am also using Ubuntu, but the later Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS version. Firstly, I would never ...


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Once, long time ago I had same issue. Problem was in broken BIOS. It is unlikely that this is RAM, as if that was RAM you should also get random crashes 'for free' and problem will happen on both drives, not on one (Am I corretly assuming that problem only happens on new drive?) I would focus on this: Exclude copy and from process. Replace it with write ...


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(Note: This presumes you're not getting a bunch of kernel errors (check dmesg or journalctl -b -k) or tons of CRC errors indicated in drive SMART status. If you are... there are a few software things to try first, like turning of NCQ.) Usually, this means bad RAM. Even when memtest86+ passes (how long did you run it for?) Unless you have ECC RAM, which I ...


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Is there any way to test whole disk? Yes, using badblocks: badblocks /dev/sda The manpage refers to partitions because badblocks can tell mkfs.ext2 about the bad blocks it finds, and that only works when checking partitions. But badblocks itself works fine on full disks. However badblocks is really a relic of a bygone era when hard drives didn’t manage ...


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