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Are you sure that things are not working? Have you tried accessing it via the network? If you look at the Grub manual and search for amd64 EFI you will see that it only supports headless boot. With your screenshot you might then have successfully booted the system. You should however not expect to see any console output on your screen. If you build your ...


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You can only have one bootloader in the MBR (Master Boot Record) at a time. Since Linux Mint was installed more recently, if you selected to install GRUB during the installation, it was installed on your drive and overwrote the previous one. If you want to use another distribution's configuration file, you would have to reinstall GRUB through that ...


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Yup, I was missing something about grub. After booting through entering the grub parameters, one needs update-grub followed by grub-install /dev/sda I'm not sure why doing it with --force didn't have the same effect. It boots without intervention now, but still takes forever because it's timing out on the "phantom" disk in the main bay. I think that's ...


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It looks like your system uses UEFI firmware and (hd0,gpt1) (first partition on the disk) is your EFI System Partition (ESP). (hd0,gpt6) (6th partition) used to be your Kali partition, which seems to be now deleted. Now only the core image of GRUB is left, probably in (hd0,gpt1)/EFI/KALI/grubx64.efi. set prefix=(hd0,gpt1)/boot/grub will only help if the ...


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OK, I figured it out. I just needed to press ESC during the automatic boot and the screen moved to the Grub menu.


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No, GRUB does not support NFS at all. Even though the linux line contains the NFS mount parameters, GRUB won't act on those; it just passes the parameters to the Linux kernel when the kernel is actually booted. Once the kernel has started up and is executing initramfs, it will use those parameters to set up a NFS-mounted root filesystem. GRUB loads the ...


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If your BIOS has a boot option that says literally "Windows Boot Manager", that is a pretty strong indication that your Windows has been installed in UEFI style.The fact that the Debian installer even offers to write GRUB to the MBR indicates the Debian installer has been booted in legacy BIOS style. A 16-bit legacy BIOS bootloader cannot chainload an UEFI ...


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I believe the recommended approach is to use grubby: grubby --update-kernel=ALL --args="mem_sleep_default=deep" will add the given argument to the kernel command line, and grubby --update-kernel=ALL --remove-args=mem_sleep_default will remove it. grubby minimises the changes made, and when updating kernel parameters, the above will preserve the other ...


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It didn't detect your windows because it was on a different disk. When you're installing your OS's in different disks each will have different boot sectors without any conflict which is a good thing because if one of them corrupt it won't affect the others. You need to go to your BIOS setting and change the boot device from your SSD to your Hard Drive.


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As per @donquixote's answer - I also had the exact same 60_memtest86+_proxy and 62_memtest86+_proxy files in /etc/grub.d/. Running update-grub resulted with syntax errors in my /boot/grub/grub.cfg that read: ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/~60_memtest86+_proxy ### if [ "${grub_platform}" == "pc" ]; then fi ### END /etc/grub.d/~60_memtest86+_proxy ### ### BEGIN /...


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Those were the best available versions when Debian 9 was released. Looking at the changelog leading up to version 2.02~beta3-5deb9u2 provides some explanation: 2.00 was indeed released in 2012, and uploaded to Debian experimental; it was uploaded to unstable (targeting the next stable release) in May 2013, after 14 revisions in Debian (and with a number of ...


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You could install the current version from buster which is the same version as from your Ubuntu. As described in this answer, you could add the buster main repository to your apt sources and set the default release to "stretch" to give packages from stretch a higher priority. You can then install newer packages from buster manually with sudo apt -t buster ...


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Kali linux's installation encryption manager installs luks2 by default, but GRUB2 only supports luks1. Start the installation as normal and then use the shell from the installation menu to setup encryption with cryptsetup using the option --type luks1. You can also setup the logical volumes in the shell with the various lvm commands. Once returned to the ...


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I was not able to get it to boot up with grub-imageboot, neither with the .iso or the .img which grub-imageboot detected and installed entries for resulted in anything but a corrupted video display. I put the iso on a bootable usb with dd and it worked fined.


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Looks like your system use systemd's udev. So, let's start to this service manpage (systemd-udevd.service(8)): The behavior of the daemon can be configured using udev.conf(5), its command line options, environment variables, and on the kernel command line, or changed dynamically with udevadm control. And further: KERNEL COMMAND LINE ...


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You can try this: Download the Super Grub2 Disk ISO and insert the image into your virtual optical drive and boot from it. Choose "Detect and show boot methods" from the menu; Super Grub2 should find your grub.cfg and add the entries to the list of boot options and bypass the password protection. Find the menu entry (scroll a bit down) and press e to edit ...


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I had the same problem with Xubuntu 18.04 but I couldn't find anything wrong in /etc/default/grub or the /etc/grub.d files Since I was able to access the system despite the error, I didn't have to chroot into it which will be necessary if you cannot boot into the system. What I did was purge and reinstall grub which did the trick. The steps I used are as ...


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Even with classic BIOS, Windows 10 requires a small "system partition" (sized 100 MB or greater) in addition to the main Windows partition. See: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/configure-biosmbr-based-hard-drive-partitions This system partition contains the Windows 10 bootloader... and when installing Windows on a ...


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It worked with the Super Grub2 Disk as suggested by @Freddy. Just in case somebody else stumbles upon this question, I'm going to describe the whole procedure a bit more detailed below (contains Freddy's steps). However, the current stable iso image of the Super Grub2 Disk is not able to boot from an USB stick. I needed to go for the beta and use the ...


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Thanks to a helpful comment pointing me in the right direction, I realized I was missing the Windows boot partition on my system and thus there was nothing for os-prober to find. It turns out, when I restored my system backup earlier onto sdb, I forgot to also restore the boot partition. The fix was as simple as restoring the backup once again (making sure ...


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The meaningful part of the error message was cannot find a device for /, because mount command does not output the device entry for /. What I didn't tell in the question is that I was trying to directly install the rootfs into a BTRFS subvolume. Apparently, chroot can not detect the / device in this scenario. Here is what I was currently doing: (X is the ...


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