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3

GRUB uses the system firmware routines (i.e. BIOS in your case) for all of its disk I/O operations, so if BIOS cannot read the SD card, GRUB won't be able to do it either. GRUB's job is to load the Linux kernel and initramfs files to RAM, and then transfer control to the Linux kernel. At that point, GRUB's job is done and it won't be involved in any ...


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My case Last week I installed Xubuntu in a computer with a new and fast nvme card, that is not recognized at boot in that computer. Xubuntu uses the installer Ubiquity, and during the installation, at the partitioning window, I selected 'Something else' which means manual partitioning. I put the root partition, /, onto the nvme card I put the boot ...


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Setting up a supervisor user and password will restrict any other user from using menu entries, editing menu entries and from using the grub console. Adding --unrestricted to a menuentry allows any user to use that menu entry without entering username / password and adding --users with a list of user names allows additional users to access a menuentry. For ...


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You can use grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg instead.


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Thanks to a reddit post I found out that most tutorials don't tell you that while you are bootstrapping the system, you need to install linux and linux-firmware as well as base. When you are bootstrapping the system run this: pacstrap /mnt base linux linux-firmware I was trying to find an answer for a while, so I hope anyone with the same problem can find ...


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As pointed out by icarus and A.B. it was due to the provider using OpenVZ. I have since switched providers (to a provider using KVM) and the problem is gone.


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