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The first part (stage 1) is stored in the first 448 bytes, which is responsible for passing control to the so-called stage 1.5, located a little later in memory. This stage finally loads stage 2 from the /boot folder, and transfers control to it. The names "stage1", "stage1.5" and "stage2" belong to GRUB Legacy, i.e. GRUB versions 0.xx. When stage 1 is ...


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If you look at the sources of GRUB, available here, you find stage1 is actually defined at grub/grub-core/boot/i386/pc/boot.S. It can perform a floppy boot if configured. It does boot from a configured harddisk, and it needs to know which C/H/S it has to load stage1.5 from. The only automatic function it has is determining which drive the boot sector was ...


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Your Windows(which seems to be the default) bootloader does not know about your Linux. It will be best if you configure your Linux GRUB to know about your Windows partition and use it as a default bootloader. Here you can see an example guide: https://itsfoss.com/grub-customizer-ubuntu/ It has an ubuntu as an example, but GRUB configuration should not be ...


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Power cuts are not GRUB-seeking missiles. The fact that a GRUB rescue mode starts indicates that the core image of GRUB is in fact OK; it is just failing to read its configuration from /boot/grub/grub.cfg. The unknown filesystem error makes me think that there is some sort of filesystem issue, and boot-repair might be fixing it as a side effect, perhaps by ...


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What worked for me on OSX is combining Daniel Simon's answer and ddburrjr's comment. Download a fresh .iso image from the official web page of Kali Linux. Start VirtualBox and open the settings for the Kali Linux virtual machine. Add the downloaded iso image in the 'storage page' as a virtual cd. How? Select 'Controller: IDE' and press CD button on the ...


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echo "savedefault --default=2 --once" | grub --batch where 2 means to boot the 3rd menu entry in grub.conf. Change 2 to the appropriate menu entry number you want to boot next time.


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The most common "Emergency mode" is the one entered by your boot system (e.g. GRUB or the next stage, systemd) when the system cannot set up all the hardware it is supposed to set up (e.g. no matching graphics driver for the hardware, partition missing / cannot mount everything in /etc/fstab) etc. The way to deal with the emergency mode is dependent on the ...


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You can install Fedora version 27 or later. Fedora included the required files on it's standard 64bit ISO installer. However Fedora doesn't have the LTS option that Ubuntu has. Ubuntu as of 18.04 LTS does not support this out of the box. People have jumped through hoops to get these installs done, but it isn't trivial.


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When you only deleted some kernels, you can boot with one of the existing ones. First check, if they are in the boot menu. Either directly or in a subsection "alternative kernels" or something like this. If they are there, you can just use the menu item. Otherwise highlight the menu item for the deleted kernel and press "e" for edit. Then edit the file ...


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It could help if you're able to say which version of Grub you're running. If you can boot to the Grub menu, you might be able to edit the config entries with 'e'. If you can get to the command-line, you can use the 'kernel' command to name the kernel file to boot from: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/old-gnu/Manuals/grub-0.90/html_chapter/grub_11.html#SEC34 Command: ...


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