6

Grub legacy (0.9x) supports ext2 and ext3 (ext3 is backward compatible with ext2) but not ext4 (unless you've turned off the backward-incompatible features, which doesn't leave much additional goodness compared with ext3). The development of Grub legacy stopped before ext4 was mature. There are unofficial patches to support ext4 on Grub legacy; the ...


5

I'm not a grub2 expert (sorry) but try adding --skip-fs-probe to your grub-install line, I have found this prevents creation of /boot/grub/device.map which can cause booting to a grub prompt. I think that without this parameter grub-install, instead of doing what you tell it, thinks it is cleverer than you, and may do something different. Another thing is ...


4

I assume you are using GRUB. With GRUB 1 (GRUB legacy, versions 0.9x), in /boot/grub/menu.lst, type in hiddenmenu. Press ESC key to show the menu. #General configuration: #Uninterupted within 5 seconds and default boot option 0. timeout 5 default 0 color light-blue/black light-cyan/blue #Hides the menu by default (press ESC to see the menu) hiddenmenu ...


3

Have you looked at The All In One Boot Floppy? It can boot a CD with a few menu selections. It using Smart Boot Manager underneath so you can look at that to make something without (or with less) interaction.


3

Finally figured it out..This is what worked for CentOS 6.4...Results might vary depending on what version you're using... UPDATE: I decided not to modify the original post but wanted to make sure that nouveau.modeset=0 should be replaced with nomodeset. At least in my case this was a better solution than using nouveau.modeset=0 which only worked on certain ...


3

I think, the problem is with root (hd0,0). You said that this is a sdb, so try uncoment your root... and set it to root (hd1,0)


2

The key item to notice in the output of /etc/grub.conf are these types of arguments being passed to the kernel: rd_LVM_LV=VolGroup00/LogVol01 Removing this argument from GRUB's linux .. line resolved the issue. These are remnants of HDD #1's LVM. These were added automatically by the install to assist you, but in this case, it's caused this pseudo ...


2

I agree to the points about the error by @rMistero. So now the grub boot from mbr and partition boot record but can't load the basic modules because they can't find it on the expected place (/boot/grub) of that partition. So reinstalling grub will fix that and the best solution is to boot to Gentoo the owner OS of grub legacy (Am I right ?), and reinstall ...


2

It looks like you are using grub-legacy on ubuntu and this is the bootloader used at boot. This error is returned if the specified file name cannot be found, but everything else (like the disk/partition info) is OK. Frequently, the error notes a missing kernel image file. Make sure that the file it is referring to exists on your boot partition. The ...


2

An alternative method is to disable this through plymouth: plymouth-set-default-plugin text /usr/libexec/plymouth/plymouth-update-initrd If you're interested in more about plymouth check out the references to it below. It's what powers the bootsplash for Red Hat based distros. References RHEL6 - disable the tiered-progress bar during boot freedesktop.org ...


2

Edit /etc/grub.conf back it up first though. Remove rhgb and quiet Reboot. Or just hit the down arrow key when the system boots to switch to no splash.


2

An better alternative to all in one boot floppy is probably to use BCDL. The bootable CD loader automaticaly boots the first CDROM. The problem is that its CD driver is no longer up to date, so you need to upgrade VIDE-CDD.SYS on the floppy with e.g. XCDROM.SYS taken from here. (Only tried with a virtual machine, not with a real FDD).


2

root (hd0,0) - Configures the root partition for GRUB, such as (hd0,0) first hard disk, first Partition and mounts the partition. kernel /vmlinuz-i686-up-4GB root=/dev/hda9 - Specifies the kernel location which is inside the /boot folder. This location is related to the root(hd0,0) statement.The root partition is specified according to the Linux naming ...


2

So my issue was with how I was doing the deletion and recreation of the partition. I was getting tripped up by fdisk and the fact that it was showing the starting location not in sectors. When I properly invoked fdisk like so: $ sudo fdisk -c -u /dev/vda Command (m for help): p Disk /dev/vda: 42.9 GB, 42949672960 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 5221 ...


2

Turned out to be both easier and harder than anticipated. First, Gentoo (as well as many other distros as far as I know), has patched Grub to be able to read GPT, thus the whole hassle with hybrid MBR is not needed, it works with pure GPT. It's easier, because standard setup (hd0,0) does work, as in 'makes a bootable system'. However the system is not ...


1

Well finally I find the solution to my problem: I downloaded the Boot-Repair-Disk, that is a Lubuntu based distro that have "boot repair" utility and other interesting utilities, this solves my problem in less than 5 minutes... I see that i'm not the only person with this problem installing Parrot OS, it seems to be a bug of the Debian-installer or ...


1

One of two things happened here: The firmware isn't honoring the update to the EFI boot order. A handful of systems which supposedly implement UEFI (especially very early ones) don't actually implement the boot manager specification properly, and will refuse to boot anything except /EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi (the name of the Windows boot loader) if ...


1

The reason it says Partition table entries are not in disk order. is because they aren't. Your sda4 is at the end of the disk, but sda5-9 is located before that. In parted the output should look something like this: # parted /dev/loop0 unit s print free Model: Loopback device (loopback) Disk /dev/loop0: 156301488s Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B ...


1

The problem is that Kali's grub does not see Windows. Ubuntu did. I suggest that you follow this guide and "repair" grub. This should install grub once again, and Ubuntu should be able to detect all OSes correctly.


1

Depending on how Grub was configured, it may not be finding the drives/partitions in the same place as they were before. For instance if your drives were plugged into the SATA_1, SATA_2, etc ports on the motherboard before, and they are not plugged into the same ports now (particularly if you moved drives to/from a SATA 6gb/s controller), this will change ...


1

The German Ubuntu wiki (don't worry, the information should be understandable even for people who don't speak German) seems to show an even better way: http://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/GRUB-Umgebung_analysieren?redirect=no#GRUB-Version-in-MBR-oder-Partitions-Bootsektor-ermitteln sudo hexdump -v -s 0x80 -n 2 -e '2/1 "%x" "\n"' /dev/sdXY The result can be ...


1

First, there are two rather different versions of Grub. The older version can be referred to as "Grub" or "Grub legacy". The newer version is Grub2. In the places where a user typically wants to make changes they work very differently (Grub legacy is simpler, Grub2 offers finer control). When booting, execution jumps from BIOS to the first boot device. On a ...


1

On my F17 box, I still have /boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz which is meant to be the grub splash screen. It's contained in the fedora-logos package. The directory contains nothing else. My guess is this will be fixed sooner or later.


1

I'm not sure about grub legacy, but in grub 2 (which I'm using) I've added 'insmod progress'. That gives me indication and progress.


1

The grub manual describes the limitations caused by platforms and that GRUB only uses AT keyboards. I am not aware of any keyboards for foreign languages that do not also support basic ASCII. All European seem to do so, even if specific characters are not used in a language (except for foreign words). Spanish keyboards have k and w that were not in the ...


1

It depends on your partition table. If you have a separate boot partition then you should use find /grub/stage1


1

I would try using this option instead to start: kernel .... vga=ask .... This will get the Kernel to detect what modes are supported and show you them in a list. Once you've identified a usable mode, then you can add that one statically using vga=....


1

grub-mkimage creates a GRUB 2 image, not a GRUB Legacy image. grub rescue> is also a sign that you’re booting GRUB 2. You should be loading stage2 instead of pxegrub.0 here. Some versions of GRUB Legacy are netboot-enabled, but to suggest which to use and from where, I’d need to know your OS, or possibly at least which QEmu network card model you ...


1

Odd that it's not already in there, it still is for me. Anyway, add this to your /boot/grub/menu.lst: timeout 5 default 0 That sets grub to boot the first entry after five seconds. If you prefer the second, third, etc. entry in your grub configuration, change 0 accordingly. If you want something other than the newest kernel, you may need to check that ...


1

Most likely not unless you can tell the kernel/init to use a splash image; once GRUB loads the kernel its work is done and it relinquishes all control of the system to the kernel (which in turns calls init when it's ready to proceed) I admit I've never tried any of them, but splashy seems well supported. ... Also, 2.6.31 is "legacy" now?


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