91

This is all due to the fact that the X server is out-dated, ill-suitable for today's graphics hardware and basically all the direct video card communication is done as an extension ("patch") over the ancient bloated core. The X server provides no builtin means of synchronization between user rendering the window and the screen displaying a window, so the ...


79

convert is a handy command line tool to do that. cd to the folder containing your png-files and run this command: convert -delay 10 -loop 0 *.png animation.gif Source: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1132058


50

Newer versions of ffmpeg have no -sameq (see faq) but do have GIF support. ffmpeg -i %03d.png output.gif Where %03d is the frame ID in 3 digits. You may also try to use ffmpeg to create a movie out of a sequence of images and then convert the movie to a GIF animation (again using ffmpeg). # cf. http://pages.uoregon.edu/noeckel/MakeMovie.html # ...


44

You could use gnuplot for this: primes 1 100 |gnuplot -p -e 'plot "/dev/stdin"' produces something like You can configure the appearance of the graph to your heart's delight, output in various image formats, etc.


38

I've just gone through a hell of a time trying to get my discrete graphics to work in Ubuntu and answering this questions was constantly a challenge, since the lspci method mentioned earlier can sometimes say that both are [VGA controller] I think the following command should give you an indication of your active chip: $ glxinfo|egrep "OpenGL vendor|OpenGL ...


36

I can address your question, having previously worked with the Linux FB. How Linux Does Its FB. First you need to have FrameBuffer support in your kernel, corresponding to your hardware. Most modern distributions have support via kernel modules. It does not matter if your distro comes preconfigured with a boot logo, I don't use one and have FB support. ...


31

Unfortunately Jessie as released doesn't fully support Broadwell graphics. The required drivers have been backported though, so if you enable Jessie backports you can fix this. First you need to add Jessie backports to your repositories, if it's not already there (thanks to Anders for the reminder to use a separate file): echo deb http://http.debian.net/...


19

The convert's --delay option only applies to the next image on the command line. So convert -delay 10 * will only set the delay of the first frame to 0.1 second. The option need to be repeated: convert $(for a in *; do printf -- "-delay 10 %s " $a; done; ) result.gif For your sorting need, convert does not sort frames, the shell globing * does. If you know ...


16

Screen tearing appears mostly because of two reasons - drivers that aren't there yet, and lack of vsync with certain window managers. As for drivers, both free and proprietary drivers support free-tearing compositing (nvidia and amd both). Be aware that e.g. enabling tear-free desktop in catalyst (fglrx) may cause frame drop and lags, so it is usually ...


14

To check which GPU is currently in command (that means which is an active VGA controller) type in lspci -vnnn | perl -lne 'print if /^\d+\:.+(\[\S+\:\S+\])/' | grep VGA Any controller with [VGA controller] at the end is your currently active GPU. The others are switched off. In the following example the Intel card is active while the nVidia one is not in ...


14

If you're using an nvidia driver >= 365.20, then try enabling the "Force Full Composition Pipeline" option in nvidia-settings.


14

yes, outside X-server, in tty, try command: cat /dev/urandom >/dev/fb0 if colourfull pixels fills the screen, then your setup is ok, and you can try playing with this small script: #!/usr/bin/env bash fbdev=/dev/fb0 ; width=1280 ; bpp=4 color="\x00\x00\xFF\x00" #red colored function pixel() { xx=$1 ; yy=$2 printf "$color" | dd bs=$bpp seek=$(($...


13

Install the kernel-headers package and try again. If it doesn't work, try cp -v /usr/include/linux/version.h /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/build/include/linux


13

I would do this in R. You'll have to install it but it shouold be available in your distributions repositories. For Debian-based systems, run sudo apt-get install r-base That should also bring in r-base-core but if it doesn't, run sudo apt-get install r-base-core as well. Once you have R installed, you could write a simple R script for this: #!/usr/bin/...


11

If it might be that a very simple terminal printout would suffice, and that you could be satisfied by inverted axes, consider the following: seq 1000 | grep -n 11 | while IFS=: read -r n match do printf "%0$((n/10))s\n" "$match" done The above charts an inverted trend on a 10% scale for every occurrence of the pattern 11 in the output of seq 1000. ...


11

For Images: You can watch images with fbi: NAME fbi - linux framebuffer imageviewer SYNOPSIS fbi [ options ] file ... DESCRIPTION fbi displays the specified file(s) on the linux console using the framebuffer device. PhotoCD, jpeg, ppm, gif, tiff, xwd, bmp and png are supported directly. For other formats fbi tries to use ...


10

Your laptop should have /sys/class/backlight. For example, /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness. You can write (echo) values to this file to adjust brightness. cat /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/max_brightness > /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness This will set the brightness to max. Just put it in an init script on boot.


9

I've finally found the solution to my problem!! First of all, many many thanks to all who contributed and in particular TechZilla and the detailed explanation he provided without which I think I would have given up long ago! So basically all that needs to be done is enable modesetting (modeset=1) when the i915 kernel module loads. This can be done the ...


9

Looking into the readme indeed helps sometimes :) This behaviour is intentional to give different users the chance to have their own settings. In short the nvidia-settings config file is stored in ~/.nvidia-settings-rc and can be executed by calling nvidia-settings --load-config-only at startup. For more details, here's the relevant part of the readme: ...


9

Yes and no. Linux is perfectly happy to run even without a video terminal at all (consider serial console or "headless" setups). Linux is perfectly happy to run in 80x25 character mode with 16 colors. However, it would seem pretty wasteful to have a high-end graphics card doing nothing but displaying text at what amounts to 720x350 pixels screen ...


9

I had a strong tearing here and now it is solved. After reading this (wonderful explanation) of how an Xorg server works I realized that X server paints window updates directly to the memory card at any random time unless you use a compositing enabled window manager. When compositing is enabled the window manager put together all the changes from the ...


8

I arrived here after installing nvidia-current from the package repository, and got stuck on a login loop. I looked at the log on ~/.xsession-errors and found the mentioned error: Xlib: extension "GLX" missing on display ":0". I already had uninstalled nvidia-current and the problem persisted. I also didn't have glx-alternative-nvidia installed. As a last ...


8

You can configure Xorg to disable OpenGL / GLX. For a first try, you can run a second X session: switch to tty2, log in and type: startx -- :2 vt2 -extension GLX To permanently disable hardware acceleration, create a file: /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/disable-gpu.conf with the the content: Section "Extensions" Option "GLX" "Disable" EndSection Note that ...


7

nvidia-smi -L This gave me what I wanted. This command shows the list of GPUs present on your machine. This might help you figure which are active ones. got the command from thread here: Ubuntu Box with multiple NVIDIA GPU Cards | devtalk.nvidia.com


7

nvidia-settings GUI On Ubuntu 15.10, after I installed nvidia-352 and the GPU seems to work: nvidia-settings shows something like: Note how it shows: GPU 0 - (NVS 5400M) where NVS 5400M is my GPU model. Then if I fire glxgears, the GPU usage goes to > 90%. So I expect that if you had multiple GPUs, you could see how much each one was being used at a ...


7

Update: Use convert for the png-to-gif, then use gifsicle for the animation. It's not a One App To Do It All solution, but scriptable, for sure. GIMP can create animated gifs and provides control for timing/delay and repeat, etc


7

KVM is normally supported already via libvirt and the kernels in modern distros without much hassle. You just need a CPU that has VT-d extensions (or AMD-V for AMD processors), and your BIOS has to have it enabled. After that, it's all about installing the necessary packages to get it going. XEN, yes, does support it. Xen is literally its own platform. A ...


6

ImageMagick provides a super-nice set of command-line tools for image manipulation. Check it out at http://www.imagemagick.org/.


6

But init.d screws me over by changing into a screen resolution that my monitor/graphics card does not support. I have the feeling it is some VESA mode that is being changed. I don't think that's an init process. That's the kernel. It occurs during the boot messages, right? If you compile the kernel without framebuffer support, it should not happen. If ...


6

The nouveau driver itself is entirely free software. On recent GPUs though it needs to load proprietary firmware into the GPU; see the list of NVIDIA blobs in the firmware-misc-nonfree package’s description in Debian. The “state of Nouveau” presentation from last year’s XDC covers some of the issues. You can determine whether your own system uses firmware ...


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