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I've had the same problem since updating (or actually installing) 18.04 after 16.04. The thing was that, firstly, I've had a lot of trouble managing my Nvidia drivers (K2100M is a real trouble maker). So, I had random crashes even when watching movies, coding or even when the laptop was closed. I've recently updated the kernel to 15.0.0.25-generic via ...


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I believe you got 'ran out of memory' errors which will freeze a virtual everytime. You should use max 128 MB video memory. u can increase ram memory since video memory is part of the allocated ram. Also, it is recommended to use 2 cores for linux mint.


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Usually it's "just" X11 that becomes unusable. To get a keystroke from your keyboard to a program, and have it show anything on screen, code in several different processes has to run. (X server to get the keystroke from the kernel, xterm or equivalent to get the event and decide to draw something, then send a message to the X server to draw a glyph from a ...


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What can make Linux unresponsive for minutes when browsing certain websites? You are not using Linux right. Which becomes especially noticeable on a resource limited machine. You don’t need more RAM, nor a faster processor. Background: Almost every non-user program’s priority is 0. Almost every user program’s priority is 20. To ‘fix’ your issue: Leave ...


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When I read the title my immediate thought was "not enough RAM", because I have experienced exactly this problem myself on Linux, 10+ minutes of frantic disk thrashing after opening too many browser tabs. I agree, it's dismal, and needs improvement. Windows handles this situation much better. Some suggestions: Add a memory monitor applet to your system ...


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Some excellent discussion of how the problem is caused, continues and grows. I like to get ahead of problems such as you experience by throwing hardware at the initial computer’s design, and/or upgrading an existing implementation. Can you, add RAM (32GB works great for many setups) replace your hard disk drive with an SSD add an SSD (Solid State Drive) for ...


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Your htop output shows that your need of RAM is higher than its capacity (total RAM+SWAP). So the obvious first consideration to make is to reduce RAM usage or increase RAM availability. Note that modern-day firefox versions are extremely resource-hungry, due to the way that windows/tabs are given process and memory space. The idea was to avoid crashing ...


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You're asking me to guess and put an upper bound on it. I can try to share my experience. I won't say you shouldn't ask for high standards, I just want to be realistic about the standard that Linux currently meets :-). With your amount of RAM, swap, and type of storage. If the RAM usage is due to multiple interactive apps. Only one of them is being ...


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AFAIK, bloatware shouldn't make the OS unresponsive, so I wouldn't consider or even accept that the bloatware is the root cause of the problem You're not going to like this, but I think bloatware is your problem (although I'm not sure if it's memory or disk which is the problem). Unfortunately, the Linux kernel is awful at handling high memory pressure ...


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What can make Linux so unresponsive? Overcommitting available RAM, which causes a large amount of swapping, can definitely do this. Remember that random access I/O on your mechanical HDD requires moving a read/write head, which can only do around 100 seeks per second. It's usual for Linux to go totally out to lunch, if you overcommit RAM "too much". I ...


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What's the output of free -m? The amount of RAM you have is pointless if we don't know how much you're using. That and I'm interested to know how much swap space is being used. I do think you've answered your own question, though. Having open "many tabs" open in your browser can definitely slow down your system if you're never closing them, as they'll ...


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Reboot the PC, select booting from the version of Mint you installed, and hold SHIFT to force the boot menu of GRUB to appear. Then, replace quiet where it appears in the commands for the first item in the GRUB menu with nomodeset, and then continue with booting. Here are two videos; the first is for the EFI/UEFI boot configuration most common with Windows ...


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it might be a memory failure, corrupt installation, driver problem, or basically anything. how old is the SSD? If I were you I'd start with checking memory with memtest followed by SMART test for the ssd. I presume no video card? then if the tests shows good result I'll do clean install and if it still fails I'll manually check log files


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I'm facing the same issue as you with a laptop ACER Apire VX5-591G series [NVIDA GEFORCE GTX, Intel i7]. I have this problem 2 years ago and tried many different distributions: Manjaro, Debian, Ubuntu, Elementary OS and, in all of them, I had the laptop freezing on shutdown. I tries all the suggestions in changing the acpi mode, editing the grub files, etc. ...


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