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4

pkg autoremove doesn't do what you think it does. pkg autoremove is used for removing orphan packages, which were installed during dependency resolution and are no longer needed. What you should do is pkg delete <pkg> for what you want to uninstall. Then there are a number of steps needed to install a port if you are going to use make. First step ...


3

Carefully. It's easy to jam the operation of devd with a program that doesn't terminate speedily. To avoid that, you should probably run a monitor program that connects to devd's output at /var/run/devd.seqpacket.pipe like volmand does, for example. On the other hand … If you still do want to invoke things from devd directly, then first note that there's ...


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The best way would be to ask nginx directly. nginx -t tests for the default configuration file and shows its location (and also throws an error with the file path if it is not found). Example: $ nginx -t nginx: [emerg] open() "/opt/common/conf/nginx.conf" failed (2: No such file or directory) nginx: configuration file /opt/common/conf/nginx.conf ...


2

That you see 2610:1c1:1:606c::50:15 in the output means that the AAAA lookup for freebsd.org did work. The BSD ping6 command, itself, may not be doing PTR lookups (NetBSD doesn't), but you can verify the system resolver is also working there with nslookup. e.g on a NetBSD system: % ping6 freebsd.org PING6(56=40+8+8 bytes) 2001:470:30::a654:105 --> 2610:...


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You should not use devd (on FreeBSD) or udev (on Linux) for that. Any X11 client can use the XInput/XInput2 extension to monitor when X11 input devices like mice or keyboards are added or removed. No need to run as root from devd/udev, mess up X11 authentication and commit layer violations, cope with devd/udev's limitations, assume that it's a single user ...


1

It turns out the reason the /usr/local/sbin/etcupdate script was failing was because it was protecting some files from being deleted by setting a chflags schg system immutable flag, see line 213 of that script: chflags -R noschg $1 >&3 2>&1 || return 1 Unfortunately, it was unable to clear that flag further on, and lines 265-266 were erring ...


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It's a good idea to make judgments based on different operating systems. if [ -d /etc/nginx ]; then cp YOURFILE /etc/nginx/ elif [ -d /usr/local/etc/nginx/ ]; then cp YOURFILE /usr/local/etc/nginx/ else cp YOURFILE /some_other_dir/ fi


1

What you see on bugs is conversation regarding updating to unifi6. It's not available in ports right now but, since the PR was only filed six days ago, it looks like someone is very, very close to completing it. In the meantime, it's not available anywhere from FreeBSD itself. The best you could do right now is try to install it yourself from the unifi site ...


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Q: "Does this mean mongodb is not supported on X86?" A: Yes. Mongodb was marked 64 bit only Feb 2016.


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As always, the FreeBSD Handbook should be your first resource for looking into these things. The traditional UNIX® programs for backing up a file system are dump(8), which creates the backup, and restore(8), which restores the backup. And this works great for many cases. Some people might just tar certain directories, such as /etc and /usr/local/etc and /...


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NetBSD can indeed be run with an encrypted root filesystem, via a kernel module called cdgroot (though it still needs an unencrypted partition to boot from). See the following for some comments on the concept and configuration: NetBSD Root Filesystem Encryption


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