New answers tagged

0

Unmount the partition Create a full image of the partition in question just in case, e.g. sudo cat /dev/sdXX > /some/where/else.img Run sudo e2fsck -f /dev/sdXX - hopefully the directory will be recovered. If it doesn't or you face further issues, please try using R-Studio Undelete which is one of the most powerful recovery tools out there.


1

Since they are small, and you do have a terminal, this is sure to work: tar czf - file1 file2 file3 | gzip -9 | base64 | more Copy and paste the base64 stream from the screen or (better!) the session log, then decode with base64 -d. Another possibility, from outside, since SSH works (assuming scp does not): ssh user@server "tar cf - file1 file2 file3 | ...


1

scp the files on the remote machine to your local machine. Something like scp user@remote:/path/to/file localfile If for some reason you cannot use scp, I think you need to reach out to a sysadmin about why mv isn't working.


1

I presume you're talking about bad blocks in files? # drop FS caches to force the kernel to reread files from the disk echo 3 | sudo tee /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches # simply read files to RAM find /directory -type f -exec cat '{}' >/dev/zero \; If this command completes without showing any error messages on the screen, all the files are readable and there ...


-2

I don't know a single reason of having a case-sensitive FS: the only thing it does is that it utterly confuses the user. Microsoft developers understood it from the get go and didn't bother with a broken concept. Now, thirty years later some Linux developers have realized that case insensitivity is safer and more logical and have finally implemented it. Why ...


1

Other operating systems have case insensitive filesystem. As example: MacOS permit case-insensitive (as default) or case-sensitive. Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom doesn't work well with case-sensitive file system. This means that within Adobe programs, there are probably hardcoded paths, written in different ways (maybe "Documents" and "...


1

There is a great big file with a periodically updated list of all (or nearly all) of the files on the system; generally it's whatever locate or mlocate uses, (e.g. /var/lib/mlocate/mlocate.db), depending on your system. Try this: locate -S The output will vary somewhat. On my system it instantly shows: Database /var/lib/mlocate/mlocate.db: 544,777 ...


0

Use gparted, is has tool to resize. You will have to shrink another partition, unless you have free space else where.


1

Why is there no /group/«groupname» directory? Because nothing has made them. Would it be beneficial to have a directory structure analogous to /home/<username> for groups? Maybe: There are many groups that should not be included (this is the same for users). If you find it useful, then create them.


2

blkid determines the type of the device's content based on the content metadata. In your case, /dev/mmcblk0p32 is actually formatted as an ext2 file system. On the other hand, the file system type in /proc/mounts has the same semantics of mount's -t option: the type from the kernel's point of view (i.e. the driver to use). The ext4 file system driver can, ...


0

Using a file archiver such as tar will apply compression, and you can recreate the files when required, but not transparently tar czf bothfiles.tgz original_file_v1 original_file_v2 tar cf - original_file_v1 original_file_v2 | gzip > bothfiles.tgz To recover the first file, tar xzf bothfiles.tgz original_file_v1 S3QL will apply compression and ...


-1

This option doesn't make any sense if you don't specify a device to work on. In a perfect world blkid -O 18446744073709551615 should just print something like,"-O offset requires an argument" and exit but it doesn't. You may file a bug report here https://bugz.fedoraproject.org/util-linux From the man page: -O, --offset offset Probe at the ...


1

To be able to perform a Btrfs system snapshot to an inaccessible location outside of the directory structure, the root directory had to be moved from the bare file system to a subvolume. I think it was openSUSE who was the first distro to implement this by default, and they called the root subvolume "@". All other system subvolumes then also got an ...


2

Your LV /dev/cl/root is already at the maximux available size. what you need is to resize the file system. If you let the default options, it's xfs, so the command should be: xfs_growfs / this command will extend xfs volume to all available space. Have in mind that xfs volumes cannot be shrinked. Using xfs_growfs / -D size, you can specify a size to extend, ...


-1

If you have added new pv to vg group then you need to use lvresize command as below lvresize -L +Sizeyou_want_add lvpartitionname resize2fs lvpartitionname After above steps increased size will display


1

I understand that one cannot do VFS operations on a medium with no filesystem. The question becomes "just which operations are we talking about?" which you clarify below... Given that, how does a utility like fio perform VFS-like read/write/seek operations on raw devices? While read/write/seek can be done on things that have a VFS, they are not ...


11

The question marks mean that ls can’t read the corresponding information; it reports that at the top of its output: ls: cannot access 'gvfs': Permission denied gvfs is inaccessible to all users except its owner, even to root, because it’s a user-owned FUSE mount — such mounts are inaccessible even to root, to prevent a malicious FUSE process from taking ...


3

Use -xdev (as shown in previous answers to your questions involving find): find / -xdev -inum 2 Replace / with whatever mount point you’re interested in.


4

The mount output lists the file system types: /dev is a devtmpfs (a virtual file system exporting device nodes) /run is a tmpfs (a virtual memory file system) /sys is a sysfs (a virtual file system exporting kernel objects) All of these live in memory, not on your drives. man 5 proc tmpfs sysfs will show you the documentation for these, or you can follow ...


2

Because they're on different file systems. It's the device_id:inode tuple which uniquely identifies a file, not just the inode. # mount ... /dev/sda8 on / type ext4 (rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro) tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,noexec,relatime,size=816612k,mode=755) udev on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,nosuid,relatime,size=4032552k,nr_inodes=1008138,mode=755)


2

The super fast way of incrementing a number in a file, could be: awk -F, '{$0=$0+1}1' OFS=, failtoban.txt >tmp; mv tmp failtoban.txt and for decrementing the number you can do: awk -F, '{$0=$0-1}1' OFS=, failtoban.txt >tmp; mv tmp failtoban.txt But, what this is not taking into account is the situation, where you have too fast increments or decrements ...


0

You probably have a system with UEFI, and the error message is related to the FAT32 filesystem's "dirty bit" on the EFI System Partition (ESP). This partition is usually mounted as /boot/efi, but some distributions mount it in a different location (possibly /boot) or leave it completely unmounted except when actually updating the kernel and/or ...


0

What file system is on /mnt/mydrive is the question? It's FAT32. FAT32 file system can't hold Unix ownership and permissions. You need some Unix file system like Ext4 for example.


0

yet another script: https://gist.github.com/s5unty/e636a1ca698c6817330825eba67941e7 1: pack /boot into multiple tar file $ tar -c -v --index-file=pack.index -M -L 10M -f /dev/null -F pack.sh /boot && pack.sh END ———— -rw-r--r-- 1 8.8K Sep 1 22:30 pack~1.index <-- file list -rw-r--r-- 1 11M Sep 1 22:30 pack~1.tar <-- tar file (not a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included