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There are two separate things: the filesystem, a data structure that provides a way to store distinct named files, and the block device (disk, partition, LVM volume) on inside of which the filesystem lies resize2fs resizes the filesystem, i.e. it modifies the data structures there to make use of new space, or to fit them in a smaller space. It doesn't ...


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Debian doesn’t maintain old point releases in an installable form in its main archives, and I don’t think Ubuntu does either; a new network-based install of either will install the current point release. However, at least for Debian, you can use snapshots to install an older point release. See this Super User Q&A for details: you can extract the ...


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Boot into a live environment from a CD / USB drive and format your disk from there. Also obviously make sure you copy all of your data off first and have backups, you can't "change" a filesystem, only completely remove one and replace it with another empty one.


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What I would do first is trying to identify what filled the drive. According to your mounts I would start checking /home, /usr or /var (/var keeps logs, maybe a process is generating too much error messages in your logs) disk usage, once you find a directory that took your space go down and find subdirs. Once you nailed it you can see if it was your problem ...


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Usually this symptom means the certificate file you've configured on the Zulip server has an incomplete chain. The Zulip docs explain: Your certificate file should contain not only your own certificate but its full chain, including any intermediate certificates used by your certificate authority (CA). See the nginx documentation for details on what this ...


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The most common "Emergency mode" is the one entered by your boot system (e.g. GRUB or the next stage, systemd) when the system cannot set up all the hardware it is supposed to set up (e.g. no matching graphics driver for the hardware, partition missing / cannot mount everything in /etc/fstab) etc. The way to deal with the emergency mode is dependent on the ...


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Short answer: No. The inode information is just that - info. Each inode stores the attributes and disk block location(s) of the object's data. Reading and writing to files will update some of the inode info, but that is irrespective of what the info was previously. Edit: I was considering SSDs. It is possible there could be a Very Minimal seek overhead on ...


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Using a FUSE filesystem (Filesystem in Userspace), you can write a program using the libfuse library to implement most file operations. You effectively mount a program on a directory, and any operations you do in the directory are passed via the kernel to the program which provides a reply. There are several Perl and Python packages with example programs ...


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robartsd is 101% correct when they advise you to backup your data; I think multiple backups, each verified, is called for before you convert from ext4 to XFS. Yes, it's 288 TB, but only you know what would happen if you lost your data. One suggestion is to run mkfs.xfs /dev/xvdf1 -f , a package almost certainly installed in your RHEL now, after reviewing ...


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The extensible filesystem family (ext) has provided one way in place upgrades (ext2 to ext3 and ext3 to ext4); but this is only possible because the filesystem was specifically designed to be able to do this. There may be other filesystem families that are designed with a similar feature. In the case of a within family filesystem upgrade the risk of failure ...


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I encountered this issue today on my Lenovo Yoga 730 with an ADATA NVMe 512G drive. I had errors when running mkfs.ext4, but it did complete. Once I tried to mount the partition I received the same error as described. I tried the May 2019 Arch release and did not have the problem. Seems the issue was introduced with the June 2019 release. Using the May ...


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Some of the questions/suggestions left by the other answer can be answered by reading the documentation below. I don't believe discard is recommended on filesystems. It is recommended to run fstrim periodically instead. You can find a cron job for this. Kernel developers are not particularly happy about the performance of discard operations, even ...


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man mv says: As the rename(2) call does not work across file systems, mv uses cp(1) and rm(1) to accomplish the move. The effect is equivalent to: rm -f destination_path && \ cp -pRP source_file destination && \ rm -rf source_file


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