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32

The sudo command gives temporary adminstrator privileges to a user. If you use this then you bypass any security controls. On a managed multiuser system very few users would have this right - typically just the system administrators. On a home system it's probably that you would have this by default so that you can look after your own system. Remove FolderA ...


11

Using sudo from a user account means that you are no longer operating as that user, but as the super user. As far as the system is concerned, userA and userB have the same privileges - they are both the super user, in other words. If you wish to limit the privileges of one user under sudo, you can do that in the sudoers file via the command sudo visudo. Note ...


6

As others have explained - sudo allows you to temporarily assume administrative privileges (effectively running your command as root). It's still safer than just logging in as root though - as only the commands you prefix with sudo receive this permission (protecting you against accidentally running something with root permissions because you forgot it was a ...


1

There is only 1 file with 1033 bytes of size. bandit5@bandit:~$ find -size 1033c ./inhere/maybehere07/.file2 bandit5@bandit:~$ Why 1033c and not 1033? Check the man page -size n[cwbkMG] File uses n units of space, rounding up. The following suffixes can be used: `b' for 512-byte blocks (this is the default if no suffix is used) ...


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