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In fact, you have 2 partitions only. The "Extended" means that an other kind of partition table is used to overcome the available number of "primary" partitions (max 4) in standard MBR partiton table. Another problem I see: you cannot change size of a mounted partiton, what you probably did try. Each partiton have to be continuous so you cannot "resize" the ...


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First, since we can not know what exactly happened to your partitions/file systems, this advice is given without any guarantee. Before making changes to your partitions and/or file systems you should backup the raw data, e.g. by booting from a live USB and copying your entire disk to a safe location. Saving it as a compressed regular file (to save space) is ...


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It looks like you forgot to resize the filesystem after shrinking the partition. You must use resize2fs in order to shrink the filesystem to be smaller than the partition is. You cannot have partitions that are smaller than filesystems resize2fs /dev/sda2 239G This should give you one gig of space to ensure the filesystem is smaller than the partition ...


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What you can do is set up an LVM logical volume on the new disk, copy the xfs filesystem to the new logical volume, replace the old xfs with an LVM physical volume, and then add the new physical volume to the LVM volume group. Finally, you can resize the new logical volume to give it more storage space. This would effectively allow the new xfs filesystem to ...


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Ok, I'm not sure why this hasn't been answered yet, as it is straight forward. So I'll just throw this out here. /dev/sda2 4892672 1953262990 1948370319 929,1G Microsoft LDM data is a Microsoft dynamic disk. GNU mount cannot handle it, as it doesn't understand the file system type. You will need to install ldmtool. #[bash]: ldmtool create all Will ...


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