Hot answers tagged

35

I think you might be able to accomplish what you want using network block devices (NBD). Looking at the wikipedia page on the subject there is mention of a tool called nbd. It's comprised of a client and server component. Example In this scenario I'm setting up a CDROM on my Fedora 19 laptop (server) and I'm sharing it out to an Ubuntu 12.10 system (client)...


34

You can't use dd this way (it might work for DVD-RAM though). What you are looking for is growisofs - (the main) part of dvd+rw-tools. growisofs -Z /dev/dvdrw=image.iso


20

One alternative to nbd (if you're interested) is using iSCSI. tgtd can be configured to have a /dev device as its backing storage for a particular iSCSI IQN. If you're on a RHEL system so you just need to install scsi-target-utils and then configure/start tgtd on the source system. Configuration of tgtd can get involved but Red Hat provides plenty of ...


16

I think that the simplest answer is that dd, dd_rescue and ddrescue are not designed to defeat copy protection schemes. They make no assumptions about the format of the data and try to maintain the integrity of the whole of the original on disk data. In the case of dd I suspect that it is terminating due to an intentional read error on the disk that is part ...


15

People mention that opening the DVD with VLC (which displays the DVD menu) magically makes the data accessible to dd, but nobody has yet explained why that is and how VLC accomplishes this feat. I managed to replicate this behavior when trying to play a DVD in my computer from a Kodi device hooked up to my TV, by using SMB to share the root of the DVD drive ...


14

I'm not sure why this works but opening the DVD first with VLC, just enough to view the menu, and then pausing lets dd work.


11

ddrescue You can try ddrescue. I read recommendation for it, but I do not have experience. There are two programs called ddrescue (see https://askubuntu.com/questions/211578/whats-the-difference-between-ddrescue-gddrescue-and-dd-rescue). Gnu ddrescue is the newer one and designed to overcome some of the problems in the older ddrescue. Gnu ddrescue uses a ...


11

You could use blkid for that: DVD_NAME=$(blkid -o value -s LABEL /dev/dvd) (you need to have read permission to /dev/dvd for that). Or: DVD_NAME=$(udevadm info -n dvd -q property | sed -n 's/^ID_FS_LABEL=//p') for which you don't need any special privilege (udev (running as root) queries the label name using blkid and updates a device database which ...


10

To extract the .VOB for Title 2, Chapter 3 Note that '-chapter 3' and '-chapter 3-' will copy from chapter 3 to the end, and if the chapter number you specify is invalid, the option is ignored, and will therefore copy the full title. # physical DVD mplayer dvd://2 -chapter 3-3 -dumpstream -dumpfile ~/3.VOB # DVD .iso image mplayer dvd://2 -...


10

Using dd command you can not write DVD. You can write DVD using growisofs command. First you have to create ISO Using dd command like dd if=/dev/dvd of=my_test.iso bs=2048 Then write DVD Using this command growisofs -dvd-compat -Z /dev/dvd=my_test.iso


9

Filesystems are often mounted noexec,nosuid by default to boost the security a bit. Hence even though you see the executable bit on the file set, kernel will refuse to run it. By calling it in the form of interpreter path/to/script you are requesting the system to run interpreter, which in turn receives path/to/script as an argument and parses it thus ...


9

linux-udf Seems to be the project you're looking for, linux-udf project. The project is mentioned in the Linux Kernel's udf.txt file. Looking through their sourceforge site the download is called udftools. Searching within my Fedora 19's package repository I found that exact package. $ yum search udf | grep "^udf" udftools.x86_64 : Linux UDF Filesystem ...


8

I believe growisofs uses dd, so the original command could work. My example uses a 22G image to bluray. Here is the output of growisofs using the dry-run option: growisofs -dry-run -speed=1 -Z /dev/sr0=/snd/BDSV_3E.iso return: Executing 'builtin_dd if=/snd/BDSV_3E.iso of=/dev/sr0 obs=32k seek=0' You can experiment. I suggest using cheaper DVDs or CDs


6

dvdbackup I usually use dvdbackup for exactly this task. I've used this tool when k3b was able to duplicate a DVD yet the disc was unplayable. Copying it with dvdbackup has worked every time. You can download it from the main site, but it should be in your Distro's repositories as well. Example $ cd /dir/where/you/save/the/dvd   # insert DVD to be copied ...


6

The basic approach is to add black borders to your video to make it fit in one of DVD's allowed aspect ratios. TLDR: skip down to In Conclusion. A few definitions First, though, I need to define a couple of different things: An aspect ratio is simply the width of something divided by the height, typically expressed as a fraction. Often the traditional ...


6

Initial Disk Quality Since we're not talking about a hard drive here, which can be recovered, you're sadly experiencing the reality that most consumer grade DVDs are NOT reliable. A physical hard disk has magnetic charged particles in a solid surface, and recovery in worst case scenarios happens by taking the disk apart physically, and then using a special ...


5

As already mentioned, ddrescue and other tools that try to re-read DVDs. In addition to that, try it with different drives. Some can handle scratches better than others. With some luck you may get a complete image of the DVD if you use multiple drives to try to read the defective parts. Finally you may be able to remove the scratches physically. You can buy ...


5

Try mplayer (or a frontend like smplayer). The issue is related to OpenGL hardware GPU accleration reference It would be helpful to know which GPU you have. Arch recently enabled SNA acceleration by default for Intel GPUs. If it's an older GPU (intel/nvidia/ati) it likely doesn't have support, so disable hw accel.


5

You should be able to use less /proc/sys/dev/cdrom/info to display the functionality of the DVD drive. 0 means an option is not enabled and a 1 signifies an option that is available. If you have libcdio installed you can use the cd-drive command for more detailed drive information. K3b is a graphical tool you can use that is similar to Nero. Navigate ...


5

When the .iso file was burnt to the DVD, it was unpacked, so it's not a .iso file any more but probably a Joliet file system by now. What your question probably means is How do I make an .iso file from a DVD? and then the answer is: sudo cat /dev/sr0 > /path/to/dvd.iso


5

As mentioned by sourcejedi, you can use sdparm to tweak the Power Condition page entries. To see the current values, run sdparm -p po /dev/sr0 (or whatever your drive is). This will show the current timeouts (ICT and SCT; the IDLE and STANDBY flags also need to be set). To change the values, run sdparm -p po -s ICT=12000 /dev/sr0 sdparm -p po -s SCT=12000 ...


4

As said in a comment, there is a cleaner way of doing that: wodim -prcap which gives exactly what you need. Device seems to be: Generic mmc2 DVD-R/DVD-RW. Also, dmesg | grep RW, in my case (DVD-RW/BD reader drive) it returns something like [ 2.399074] ata2.00: ATAPI: HL-DT-ST DVDRW/BDROM CT40N, A101, max UDMA/133 [ 2.409247] scsi 1:0:0:0: CD-ROM ...


4

You should be able to find out exactly what types of disks your burner will support. That error message indicates it doesn't support DVD-R (as backed up by your comment that it did work with a DVD+R disk) As Gilles commented, you should be able to use dvd+rw-mediainfo but failing that, you could look at the physical writer itself.


4

Sounds like you're looking for DSL http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/


4

If you don't care about the format, you can rip to an image of the DVD (as opposed to ripping to a video format, e.g. MKV, MP4, avi etc.). For this I use GNU ddrescue -- it's available as gddrescue in Debian. Note that the binary is named ddrescue. To rip, first install gddrescue and then use the following command: ddrescue /dev/sr0 dvd_name.img dvd_name....


3

To use the ISO, you can mount it as a loop device: sudo mount -t iso9660 -o loop PATH/TO/ISO /cdrom and keep the cdrom entry in your sources.list. Note that apt sources are kept current with bugs fixes, version updates and so forth. To get remote (network based sources), you will just need to edit your /etc/apt/sources.list file and remove/comment out ...


3

It's usually easier to just install the restricted extras package: $ sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras If you have any problems the official Ubuntu documentation on playing DVDs has a good troubleshooting guide as well. The specific steps outlined in @illuminE's answer are from this page as well, mainly: $ sudo apt-get install libdvdread4 $ ...


3

There are always multiple solutions, but here are how I would do things On 1) I have no advice as I am running the Classic Desktop. There is a specific Ubuntu forum on SE here 2) You use the Ubuntu Software Center, search for Java, install 'OpenJDK Java 7 Runtime' 3) You use the Ubuntu Software Center, search for VLC, install 'VLC Media Player' This has ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible