New answers tagged

0

Try to re-run your boot-manager (e.g. grub) to install the correct boot sector on your disk (try to install directly to /dev/nvme0n1, not the first partition /dev/nvme0n1p1)


1

I post this as answer since it solved my problem: The problem reason was (probably) resizing the Win10 partition from within Win10, that messed up the Linux partition table for some reason. Using testdisk from Ubuntu live-cd, I recovered the lost partition I had to edit /etc/fstab manually to set my home folder back to the lost partition. I learned my ...


0

I have these mini-servers based on raspberry pi. Lots of them. But currently we have relatively frequent malfunctions because for some reason or another the filesystem on the SD card gets corrupted and the device will no longer function correctly. SD card for rootfs isn't a good idea. At least: Do not log. Or log to a tmpfs. Tweak mount options to avoid ...


-1

Requirements for installing Arch Linux: A x86_64 (i.e. 64 bit) well matched machine. Step 1: Download the ISO. Step 2: Create a live USB of Arch Linux. Step 3: Boot from the live USB. Step 4: Partitioning the disks. Step 4: Creating filesystem. Step 5: Installation. Step 6: Configuring the system.


1

Normally, when you see a no space left error in Linux, it could be because the system either runs out of block storage or it runs out of inodes. Since you mentioned you still have free space (block) in your system, you can check whether you still have any inodes left, by running: df -i Running out of inodes is commonly found in a system where there are ...


1

Your UEFI is booting the first thing it sees, which happens to be the Windows 10 bootloader. You should change this to GRUB/reFInd as follows: On Windows 10, boot into UEFI settings as follows: Open Settings Update and Recovery Recovery Advanced Startup > Restart Troubleshoot Advanced Options UEFI Firmware settings Go to the boot tab of the UEFI settings ...


0

This worked for me in Ubuntu: Disable secure boot in Bios This command as administrator: bcdedit /set "{bootmgr}" path \EFI\ubuntu\grubx64.efi Something similar in Debian could work.


1

As a starter, I would suggest pacman -Rs xf86-video-intel Often not recommended according to https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Intel_graphics, then pacman -S nvidia optimus-manager bbswitch Reboot and if it didn't work, post journalctl -b You can also install gnome and use it to test whether it's a KDE-related issue


1

I've got the same problem on ideapad 330 (Arch linux). The simplest and working way to make my system dual bootable was to change the path to windows efi file. After restoring grub simply rename "Microsoft" directory, and make the same change in /boot/grub/grub.cfg file. Now the firmware will be unable to find windows and should start grub. The only issue is ...


1

Even with classic BIOS, Windows 10 requires a small "system partition" (sized 100 MB or greater) in addition to the main Windows partition. See: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/configure-biosmbr-based-hard-drive-partitions This system partition contains the Windows 10 bootloader... and when installing Windows on a ...


0

Thanks to a helpful comment pointing me in the right direction, I realized I was missing the Windows boot partition on my system and thus there was nothing for os-prober to find. It turns out, when I restored my system backup earlier onto sdb, I forgot to also restore the boot partition. The fix was as simple as restoring the backup once again (making sure ...


Top 50 recent answers are included