5

Windows 10 by default does a fast startup that does not fully release the drives in use. Linux cannot then write to them, because that would lead to corruption. A temporary solution is to press Shift as you restart/reboot Windows 10. But that should be repeated every time. A more permanent solution can be found here. I do not quote the details of those steps ...


4

The top three entries refer to the same instance of Fedora 31 OS, but using different kernel versions (and in case of the rescue mode, different boot options and perhaps a special rescue-oriented initramfs file). Fedora 31 simply received a kernel update from kernel version 5.3.7-701.fc31 to version 5.5.5-200.fc31. You can check the currently-running kernel ...


4

Ok, I think I figured out your problem; the system looks for the resume partition, which is the swap actually and was changed. When you boot do you see a graphic screen? Press something to view messages. The delay is usually presented (waiting... something like that) Try this: disable resume partition Unless you need hibernation; in that case you need to ...


4

Use a live session to move it back from /home/ to /usr/ In /home/ there should only be users and that tends to be 1 on de desktop so should be easy to do. Even if you moved it to /home/$USER/ not a problem: that one holds directories like Desktop, Downloads so easy to identify.


3

Have you installed ntfs support? Here is what worked for me: sudo yum install epel-release sudo yum install ntfs-3g Then make a copy of your grub configuration file: cd /boot/grub2 sudo cp grub.cfg grub.cfg.bak and finally create a new grub configuration: sudo grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg


3

The recommended solution from experience is to set Windows to use UTC. There are two ways to keep the computer clock in sync with the "real world" time. One is the default for Windows: the local time. That means that the hardware clock is set to 2:00 PM (in New York) even if the world coordinated time is (almost equal to UTC) is 6:00 PM. That means that ...


3

This type of issue is common enough with windows 10. It has a habit of reformatting your EFI partition. Grub-install for EFI installs a file to the EFI file system. It's not intelligent enough to mount the filesystem for itself first. It expects the EFI partition to be already mounted to /boot/efi. Locate your EFI partition with blkid. It should be a ...


3

Temporarily disconnect all other disks for the time of installation of Windows 10: otherwise, Windows 10 has been known to be unpredictable in deciding where it will install its bootloader. And no, even the "advanced mode" of the Windows installer won't give you a chance to explicitly choose where to install the Windows bootloader. Since you're not ...


3

Pop!_OS uses systemd-boot instead of GRUB. By default it boots Pop!_OS. You can set a boot menu timeout by setting timeout 10 in /boot/efi/loader/loader.conf. timeout – menu timeout in seconds before the default entry is booted. If this is not set, the menu will only be shown on space key (or most other keys actually work too) pressed [repeatedly] during ...


2

As of Fedora 30, Roy's answer doesn't work anymore. Fedora entries are not listed as menuentry in grub.cfg and instead are taken from files in /boot/loader/entries. You can either lookup the entries with grubby --info=ALL or take the number of files in /boot/loader/entries. Reddit thread Fedora Docs Boot Loader Specs Here the modified script below (Fedora ...


2

If you happen to boot into GRUB menu: 1. Start your system 1.1 Figure out which partition is the system one via mounting available partitions and looking for executable kernel file: grub> ls # shows list of disks and partitions available (hd0,gpt1), (hd0,gpt2) # you might have other things listed here grub> set root=(hd0,gpt1) ls /boot # if ...


2

Open Elevated Command Prompt (press Windows Key > type CMD > Right Click on Command Prompt > select Run as administrator) and enter the following: bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\GRUB\grubx64.efi (In the above command you can replace GRUB with debian for Debian OS and ubuntu for Ubuntu OS.)


2

Pair your bluetooth device(s) in Linux. Reboot into Windows, and pair your same bluetooth device(s) in Windows. Run regedt32.exe. Navigate to "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\BTHPORT\Parameters\Keys" Right-click on the "Keys" folder in the lefthand pane of the path above, and select "Export." In the pop-...


2

I could add the missing modules by installing grub2-efi-x64-modules package on Fedora. In my case I had another error after that that "EFI variables were not supported on my system". I found another stackexchange post and could fix that by exiting the chroot environment and loading the efivarfs module by modprobe efivarfs. Then I logged back in ...


2

As written in the answers to this question on AskUbuntu, I disabled PPT security in the UEFI settings: For those who are new to the BIOS, press F2 when you see the Dell logo, go to Security → PTT Security and uncheck PTT On. Click Apply (I would recommend choosing Save as Custom User Settings), then OK, then Exit.


2

Is it possible to share the /home partition with two or more separate Linux partitions? For example can I use the same /home partition with an /Arch and /Debian partition? Yep typically not an issue. If it is possible can I also use the same username for both or is it better to use different ones and share data between them? Yep, you'll want to ...


2

Solution I would abandon legacy boot for Ubuntu. EFI is designed to have multiple boot loaders side by side. The easiest thing you can do is to install grub into the EFI partition on your Windows drive and then boot "UEFI Only". To do this: Boot into Linux Locate your EFI partition. You can use sudo blkid to find the right one. Mine is /dev/sdb2. ...


2

The Arch Linux distro is far from user-friendly and I wouldn't recommend it to inexperienced users. Your CPU is seemingly 32bit only, so you might want to install a distro which still supports x86 natively and is light on resources. My recommendation would be Xubuntu 18.04 LTS 32-bit: https://xubuntu.org/download/ Lastly, if you have 1GB of RAM or less and ...


2

You seem to have an UEFI-based system. Both GRUB and the Windows bootloader are installed in the EFI System Partition (ESP for short), which is your partition (hd1,1) as GRUB sees it. Debian 10's default UEFI GRUB includes essentially all the GRUB modules in the main grubx64.efi executable, so a lack of filesystem drivers should not be the issue here. Your ...


2

I use Clonezilla for such tasks. It'll fully clone copy a hard disk to another, regardless of type, rotating, ssd, etc. It can also clone partitions, but it's much easier to clone the whole disk, especially since you surely got multiple partitions (two OSes). Of course the new disk must be equal or larger in size for the procedure to run smoothly. Don't be ...


2

I managed to fix the issue with the help of the comments. Thank you all! For completeness, I quickly state all the steps I took to fix this: Quickfix - If you quickly need to boot without solving the actual problem Insert a livestick with a functioning bootloader (I used Ubuntu 20.04 with GRUB) Once the GRUB from the livestick started, interrupt the ...


2

Just turn off formatting of the mentioned partitions and add a Root one? That's pretty much it, yeah. Though there are some caveats: Be sure neither distro leaves the swap partition in a mess for the other to find. Not sure of defaults, but the swap partition can be configured as the storage location for hibernation data. Though worst case is probably just ...


2

Boot-Repair typically adds UEFI boot entries to grub, for .efi boot files. And some systems like HP have many system utility .efi boot files in ESP. Some others have a separate FAT32 partition for those files, so less of an issue. If Boot-Repair has added those files, they will be in a new grub script file 25_custom. You can either edit that file at will, if ...


1

I use YUMI multiboot to create the USB boot drive. In YUMI when you make the bootable USB you can set a persistent file size for storing changes while running off of the USB drive. This will take some of the space on the USB for storing the changes you make while running. BTW your post is confusing. The first sentence states you want to run Linux off a ...


1

Nobody panic, I have found the answer to this hotbed of a question. Hopefully this doesn't get lost in all the replies. For anyone who searches for anything like this in the future, the solution for me was to completely nuke the EFI partition (via parted live, or your favorite rescue partition manager). From there, I created a new fat32 formatted partition ...


1

It should dual boot fine! Most distros support it in an easy fashion, (you'll want to shrink your windows partitions in windows first though,) the typical way it's done is linux installs the GRUB boot manager which is booted first when you turn on your machine. That gives you an option of loading linux, or handing over to the Windows boot manager. You may ...


1

No not with MS-Windows You can't: Windows partition manager can't resize (or even recognise) Linux partitions. How to do it You can however use it to shrink it's own partition. Then boot from a live Distro (gparted is a good one for this job). From there re-size the Debian root. You may also want to consider having a /home partition. Probably not on your ...


1

Solved it. The os-prober never returned anything from the terminal running from root (sudo -i). However, what worked: I added this entry to the Grub list (using grub-customizer or editing the file /etc/grub/40_custom directly) menuentry "Windows 10 (UEFI)" { search --set=root --file /EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi chainloader /EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw....


1

Linux and Windows home directories are quite different, so sharing them may not be in your best interest. But you can share a directory dedicated for this purpose by using a filesystem readable by both operating systems, such as FAT32 or NTFS. For encryption you can use VeraCrypt.


1

Prerquisites Have means to start Windows even if installing Ubuntu fails. For BIOS boot style, I recommend preparing a Super Grub2 Disk. With EFI boot style, it is sufficient to check whether Windows can be selected by the EFI. Have a copy of everything important. Think about all the data in Zorin. Know which partition Zorin is installed on (I assume a ...


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