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Your Windows(which seems to be the default) bootloader does not know about your Linux. It will be best if you configure your Linux GRUB to know about your Windows partition and use it as a default bootloader. Here you can see an example guide: https://itsfoss.com/grub-customizer-ubuntu/ It has an ubuntu as an example, but GRUB configuration should not be ...


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The command you want is grub-reboot, which sets the default boot entry in GRUB (for the next reboot only). Here's an example I use: sudo /usr/sbin/grub-reboot "Windows Boot Manager (on /dev/sda2)" I could have also used sudo /usr/sbin/grub-reboot 2 (for the 3rd GRUB entry, as it starts with 0).


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Looks like your video hardware isn't being detected properly. Try to edit your grub command line and see if you can add nomodeset or edit/add gfxpayload=1024x768 to try booting with a different video mode. You can get into grub 'edit mode' by hitting the E key on the grub menu item. This brings up a rudimentary editor where you can move around with the ...


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The most common "Emergency mode" is the one entered by your boot system (e.g. GRUB or the next stage, systemd) when the system cannot set up all the hardware it is supposed to set up (e.g. no matching graphics driver for the hardware, partition missing / cannot mount everything in /etc/fstab) etc. The way to deal with the emergency mode is dependent on the ...


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It would not have been necessary to reinstall Linux in this situation: Reinstalling grub2 with the help of a live distro would have been sufficient. That does not help right now, but will save you trouble in the future. Keep in mind that Windows always wants the first disk. I have never had an EFI-Partition on any Linux-Disk, so I think you can safely use ...


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