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The Linux DNS resolver isn't good at handling the concept of multiple separate DNS namespaces. If you send a query to a particular DNS server, and it returns an authoritative NXDOMAIN, it's basically saying "I am telling you for an absolute fact that this name does not exist", and the resolver "knows" that it doesn't need to search any ...


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No special setup should be necessary: Normally, the nameserver provided in /etc/resolv.conf in the default namespace should be used in the additional namespace (nsben1), also. In my case this was not working. At first I had my LAN router as nameserver, but changed this to 8.8.8.8 in an attempt to test if something was wrong from the DNS of my routers side. ...


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Simple answer is "no". At least not for every client. SSH has no forwarding mechanism like HTTP has. DNS domain names use an A or AAAA record which have an IP but no port number. The ssh client just expects port 22. DNS does have SRV records which were designed for this type of purpose and contain a port number as well, but a lot of clients ...


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You could use an SSH config file in ~/.ssh/config to set this up: Host ssh.example.com Hostname 111.111.111.111 Port 12345 With that, you should be able to use ssh user@ssh.example.com to connect with your server. You could even add more SSH options, such as the User so you would not need to type that anymore. If you really wanted to do this with ...


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I had the same problem. I have a home network with Macs, and they want avahi/bonjour and a .local domain to share properly. My ISP provides a DSL router that provides private IP addresses (192.168.1.*) and gives a local domain (attlocal.net). However it also responds as an authority for a .local unicast domain - even though it doesn't really have one. That ...


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