9

[EDIT: I append at the end of this answer a very brief update, one year after i gave the answer here. If this update should be a second, separate answer, please lmk. Apart from this update at the end, the answer is unchanged] Your questions are very timely, even though you asked them 7 months ago. And you asked two questions, so you get two answers: Is it ...


5

DisplayPort over USB-C "Alternate Mode" is coming to Linux in version 4.19. Sources: First News: https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Linux-USB-Type-C-Port-DP-Driver Confirmation for release 4.19: https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Type-C-DP-Alt-Mode-Linux-4.19 Article Source: http://lkml.iu.edu/hypermail/linux/...


2

The display-setup-script line is in the wrong place in your config file. Move it to Seat:* (previously SeatDefaults): [Seat:*] display-setup-script=/path/to/display-setup.sh The package includes an example file /usr/share/doc/lightdm/lightdm.conf.gz that shows the correct layout. Contents of display-setup.sh: #!/bin/sh #xrandr's name for the external ...


2

I realize this is quite an old question, but since external monitors on displayports/HDMI don't play nice with Linux I might as well try to help anyone Googling this in the future. I use arch myself, but since you use xrandr (randr) to set up your monitors I suppose the same instructions should work. There is very good documentation on the arch forum on ...


2

The solution was to install Laptop Mode Tools.


2

In most cases, the RandR extension is used to configure display settings. Therefore, I will focus on it in this answer. So this answer may not apply if you're using Wayland, the proprietary NVIDIA drivers without DRM (Direct Rendering Manager) kernel mode setting enabled or have disabled the RandR extensions. If so, calling xrandr should result in an error ...


2

The simplest cause is usually the easiest - the confusing bundle of cables on this hot desk, once untangled, revealed that the DisplayPort cable was not plugged in. Now, when connected, kern.log tells me: Nov 19 14:36:02 GTA-65 kernel: [17099.717660] [drm] Reducing the compressed framebuffer size. This may lead to less power savings than a non-reduced-size....


1

I just tried this solution again. However, I changed /etc/bumblebee/xorg.conf.nvidia before running optirun intel-virtual-output and it worked this time. The Archwiki didn't mention that this must be done beforehand so I had only changed the configuration files afterwards and re-running optirun intel-virtual-output probably didn't work as there was already ...


1

Check autorandr package. You create set ups and the tool switches between them automatically.


1

First, an xrandr --listmonitors shows the displays visible for your X. For example, you will see these (I have a single-display, you will have multiple): Monitors: 1 0: +*DVI-0 1920/598x1080/336+0+0 DVI-0 Now if I would want to power off my DVI-0 display, I would issue an xrandr --output DVI-0 --off You can get a more detailed list of your display ...


1

Solved by buying a DisplayPort cable (not mini). Maybe the interface on the monitor was damaged.


1

Same issue reported in nVidia Linux forum (Concerning DP backlight stays on after DPMS power save signal) DPMS not working on GTX980 with DisplayPort connection They mention some exact releases those are not affected or already fixed. 346.96, 352.63, 358.16


1

It is the lack of support for the GPU in kernel (and likely also in X.Org video driver) which you need to somehow solve. Proper support for Sky Lake based GPUs in i915 kernel driver should be available from kernel 4.4 on. Then again, myself I still couldn't get a Intel GPU with device code 1912 working in Debian Jessie under 4.4.5 due to something with ...


1

I was having trouble with this on a Skylake NUC (Intel graphics) running Ubuntu 15.10 (4.2 kernel). I can confirm that upgrading to 16.04 beta (4.4.6 kernel) has solved the problem. Though there still seems to be some issue with the window manager 'forgetting' about the 2nd screen's desktop upon logout/in, at least under the MATE desktop. (Display is active ...


1

I have a similar setup: DELL XPS12 (2014) & 2x DELL 2414h. Currently I am running Ubuntu 15.10, but had this setup since 15.04. With 15.04 I always had to modify ~/.config/monitors.xml as one of the monitors was not detected on the right address/bus. I think it always used DP1 and DP1-1, different that the output of the xrandr command. With 15.10 I don'...


1

One solution is to use slock (apt-get install suckless-tools) which does not put the display to sleep. You'll need xautolock if you want to run it automatically.


1

Linux supports DisplayPort just as well as any other digital display output. As long as you have your graphics drivers properly installed, it should behave just as it would with DVI-D. No special procedures should be required, unless the monitor you buy just happens to be screwy. Buying a screwy monitor can usually be avoided by taking into account user ...


1

For most systems, handling which screen device to output to is dependent on the GPU or some other video display controller. All interfacing with the video device(s) on the system is handled by the Direct Rending Manager (DMS) and the closely related Kernel Mode Setting (KMS) kernel subsystems. From the Wikipedia page on the topic: In computing, the ...


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