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125

There are several different scenarios; I'll describe the most common ones. The successive macroscopic events are: Input: the key press event is transmitted from the keyboard hardware to the application. Processing: the application decides that because the key A was pressed, it must display the character a. Output: the application gives the order to display ...


52

Problem It turns out there's already an open issue in the Chromium tracker about this annoying inconvenience. Existing options offered by Hangouts have major drawbacks: Share Entire Screen: If you have multiple screens (I have three) and share "Entire Screen", other people in the hangout won't be able to see anything. Share Application: If you only share a ...


33

I enabled EFI for my VM while using gparted-live-0.22.0-2-i586 and it started working. I also noticed that the disk needed to be added to a SATA controller. It appears that older versions of gParted required EFI to be disabled.


33

It's an environment variable that is passed just to that program, rather than the shell as a whole. This happens when you set a variable on the same line as a command. X11 programs need to know where to display windows, since it's a client/server system and you could be displaying on a remote machine. This simply means use the first display on the local ...


30

Since version 4.13 i3 reads DPI information from Xft.dpi (source). So, to set i3 to work with high DPI screens you'll probably need to modify two files. Add this line to ~/.Xresources with your preferred value: Xft.dpi: 120 Make sure the settings are loaded properly when X starts in your ~/.xinitrc (source): xrdb -merge ~/.Xresources exec i3 Note that it ...


29

DISPLAY=:0 gnome-panel is a shell command that runs the external command gnome-panel with the environment variable DISPLAY set to :0. The shell syntax VARIABLE=VALUE COMMAND sets the environment variable VARIABLE for the duration of the specified command only. It is roughly equivalent to (export VARIABLE=VALUE; exec COMMAND). The environment variable ...


29

Unix GUI programs display through an X server. Cygwin doesn't automatically start an X server. You need to install the packages xorg-server and xinit, and run startxwin.


27

You can run xrandr as any user running an X session. Xrandr is a command line program, so you run it in your terminal. So you would run something like this in your user terminal $ xrandr --dpi 220


23

The Gnome / Wayland / X developers are working on this. As with OS X and Windows, the solution will probably involve decoupling applications' idea of a "pixel" from physical pixels. This is kind of silly, but solves the problem for software that makes assumptions about DPI and the relative size of a pixel. There's an update on this from Gnome developer ...


23

When you press Ctrl+X, your terminal emulator writes the byte 0x18 to the master side of the pseudo-terminal pair. What happens next depends on how the tty line discipline (a software module in the kernel that sits in between the master side (under control of the emulator) and the slave side (which applications running in the terminal interact with)) is ...


23

If you only want to change the DPI within i3, you could put the command in your i3 config file with the line: exec xrandr --dpi 220 Depending on your distro you will find the config file in different places but often under ~/.config/i3/config


22

Such behavior was the only thing that kept me away from using screen. It uses "screen" terminal and changing it to "xterm" didn't help. Adding altscreen on option in ~/.screenrc solved it. From screen's manual: altscreen on|off If set to on, "alternate screen" support is enabled in virtual terminals, just like in xterm. ...


21

Yelp is the help viewer in GNOME. yelp man:cgraph


21

Firstly, you need to feed display RGB:- raw bytes, not an encoded hex string like you're building with that hexdump | sed | tr pipeline. Secondly, you aren't giving it enough bytes: you need 3 bytes per pixel, one for each colour channel. This does what you want: mx=320;my=256;head -c "$((3*mx*my))" /dev/urandom | display -depth 8 -size "${mx}x${my}" RGB:-...


20

Please excuse my poor English. I want to share the experience I had regarding the high screen resolution and linux OS, since the information on the internet is quite scarce so far. I am an happy owner of the Dell XPS 15 Haswell 9530, with a screen resolution of 3200x1800. I have tried Debian, Ubuntu (Kubuntu/Cinnamon/Mate/Unity/Cubuntu etc.) and Mint other ...


18

First find out the name of each display e.g. using xrandr --current. Then the following command should work to duplicate them. $ xrandr --output <projector> --same-as <desktop>


17

I found the base of the solution here: https://askubuntu.com/questions/186288/how-to-detect-and-configure-an-output-with-xrandr In modern Linux distributions, including CentOS, the xrandr library is responsible for things such as screen resolution, rotation and so on. Since your system does not autodetect, you have to manually tell it about the mode your ...


16

I will give you a visual example to explain the basics of X11 and what is going on in the background: source In this example you have a local X11-server with two "screens" on your hostA. Usually there would be only one server with one screen (:0.0), which spans across all your monitors (makes multi-monitor applications way easier). hostB has two X servers, ...


14

On a GNU system, the program you're looking for is man. BROWSER=firefox man --html man Try that command (or substitute some other valid value for BROWSER=, such as, for example, cat with a redirect if you wish to save the result) and see what you get. If you want it to be the default configuration, you'll find instructions for configuring man to your ...


13

Since you know how to start the server, here is a way to gracefully stop it: x11vnc -R stop basically you send a remote command (see -remote) to the running instance.


13

Arch Linux has the following to say about xbacklight: Brightness can be set using the xorg-xbacklight package. Note: xbacklight only works with intel. Radeon does not support the RandR backlight property. xbacklight currently does not work with the modesetting driver. To set brightness to 50% of maximum: $ xbacklight -set 50 ...


12

I use this command to mirror my desktop with my external VGA: $ xrandr --output LVDS-1 --mode 1366x768 --scale 1x1 --output VGA-1 --same-as LVDS-1 --mode 1920x1080 --scale 0.711x0.711 LVDS-1 is the laptop screen , natively working in 1366x768. VGA-1 is my external VGA monitor, with native resolution of 1920x1080, scaled to 0.711 which equals close to ...


11

Updated News Good news for everybody: We have the medicine, and you won't need workaround anymore. ; ) This bug was fixed in Chromium 83 Beta (dev/unstable). I have tested the version 83.0.4103.14 (Official Build) beta (64-bit) in Kubuntu 18.04. And this version fixes this issue ! Upgrade If you want to install this version Beta, follow this steps: ...


10

I think I have found a better workaround than using vlc. We just need to create a fake webcam that shows our screen. # Unload sudo rmmod v4l2loopback # Load module sudo modprobe v4l2loopback video_nr=7 'card_label=myFakeCam' 'exclusive_caps=1' ffmpeg -f x11grab -r 20 -s 1920x1080 -i :0.0+0,0 -vcodec rawvideo -pix_fmt yuv420p -threads 0 -f v4l2 /dev/video7 ...


10

Only scaling and panning wont help. You have to specify the side of your external monitor. Please check my command, i am using external monitor to the right of my native laptop display. I have yoga 2 pro with resolution 3200x1800 and external FHD monitor. In my case i use xrandr panning option: xrandr --output eDP1 --auto --output HDMI1 --auto --panning ...


10

You're trying to create an X tunnel through SSH then overriding it by specifying an IP address which bypasses the SSH tunnel. This doesn't work. When SSH tunnelling, SSH deals with transferring data between the local and remote IP addresses by opening a port on localhost on each machine it speaks to. You don't get to specify the IP address of either computer....


10

Source : CygwinX FAQ : Since X server 1.17, by default the server does not listen for TCP/IP connections, only accepting local connections on a unix domain socket. For local clients, use DISPLAY=:0.0, rather than DISPLAY=localhost:0.0, DISPLAY=127.0.0.1:0.0, DISPLAY=::1:0.0, etc If it does not work (if you are connecting from remote): Use the -listen tcp ...


10

(Trying to improve @shcherbak answer.) To get info about the running display server write in the console: ps -e | grep tty The out put might be, for example: 1475 tty2 00:00:00 gdm-x-session 1478 tty2 00:00:40 Xorg 1489 tty2 00:00:00 gnome-session-b One of the tty* results is the terminal where you have the GUI in your linux system (...


9

GNU screen supports the xterm alternate-screen feature using the altscreen setting in your .screenrc file. According to the manual: — Command: altscreen state (none) If set to on, "alternate screen" support is enabled in virtual terminals, just like in xterm. Initial setting is ‘off’. A quick check shows that screen is actually simulating the ...


9

I was seeing the message debug1: X11 forwarding requested but DISPLAY not set because I was not setting the DISPLAY environment variable in the shell before connecting to the host. I am using 'Bash on Windows' with openssh. Here is what needs to be done: samik@mysystem:~$ export DISPLAY=localhost:0.0 samik@mysystem:~$ ssh -X samik@remotehost


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