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The cp command would only worked if you had tried it on already mounted devices. You could run the exact by using the mounting points of those devices. cp -aR /path/to/mount/point/of/dev/nvme0n1p1/* /path/to/mount/point/of/dev/sda1/ Usually you could find the mount points either by running mount or df -h. Of coursee dd is your friend when it comes to ...


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It's a miracle. Somehow I got the array back up and running. Here's what I did: As mentioned in the original post, the system wasn't shutting down because it was still trying to write something to the faulty drive. I followed the advice of user361233 and pulled the plug. I stopped panicking. With the computer shut off, I could think about the next ...


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It's difficult to answer your question, and this is too long for a comment, so just some general pointers. So now I'm panicking, thinking that the drive 2 was actually still good and now when I readded it, it's resynching, probably destroying the good data it has. Unless there is a kernel bug, re-adding a disk (in the same role and same offset it had ...


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Firstly, you can use lsblk command to do that. Step one is get all of SCSI devices only. Also all partitions, slaves and holder devices are ignored. ~$ lsblk -S NAME HCTL TYPE VENDOR MODEL REV TRAN sdb 1:0:1:0 disk Msft Virtual Disk 1.0 sr0 5:0:0:0 rom Msft Virtual CD/ROM 1.0 ata sdc 3:0:0:10 disk ...


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It's possible for things to go wrong. It's hard to rule that possibility out completely. You should always have a backup of your data. Other than that, it's as safe as it could possibly made to be. It should either just work or display a message that it couldn't be done for some reason or other. Most data loss regarding ext4 resizes are user errors (did ...


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Yes, it is safe As long as the process is not interrupted by i.e. power loss, your data will be fine. This is what resize2fs is made for. It will move data around so nothing is lost. it will warn you if you attempt something potentially harmful. I used resize2fs numerous times for offline shrinking and never experienced any problems (except human error).


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Welcome to Linux... it will be good if you get to know your man pages. There is a lot of information there.... also do a little web researching, All of this information is 'out there somewhere' You are not looking at disk usage but total filesystem usage. If you read around a little you will see that all of your tmpfs exist in memory and that your overlay ...


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