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Okay, I found this page which guides me through the basic troubleshooting steps. This was what I was looking for. If you care for our problem itself: Obviously, muxing the pins as MMC (as described in our user's guide) is not sufficient, the bus needs to be declared as being SDIO in the device-tree. Now I can continue to find out how to enable SDIO ...


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I looked at the data sheet www.digikey.co.uk/en/datasheets/parallaxinc/parallax-inc-28085-ws2812b-rgb-led-datasheet and there is no hint as to how this strip connects to anything. So before you look for a device driver, you need to figure what kind of hardware interface you are going to use, and where you are going to get it from. It also needs to supply ...


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A compile-time kernel configuration can specify whether or not include each of the standard drivers included in the kernel source tree, how those drivers will be included (as built-in or as loadable modules), and a number of other parameters related to e.g. what kind of optimizations and other choices will be used in compiling the kernel (e.g. optimize to ...


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Create an udev rule to match it. It shouldn't be necessary to run the script "after a module is loaded" – it deals with a specific device, so it would be better to run it "after the device is detected". Doesn't matter how the device was detected; as long as the kernel reports it as a 'new' device, it'll work. That said, modules have a presence in /sys just ...


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Turns out what was missing was to in make nconfig also select: Kernel -> Build Device Tree with overlay support Also, in the file <buildroot>/board/raspberrypi3-64/genimage-raspberrypi3-64.cfg add the pps-gpio.dtbo file so that the image boot.vfat section looks like this: image boot.vfat { vfat { files = { "bcm2710-rpi-3-b.dtb", "...


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Updating to kernel 4.20 the error no longer appears. I can't determine exactly which kernel commit fixed it. There are a few that might have played a roll, but nothing I could identify as an exact fit.


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Determining which device tree blob (DTB) file, which is compiled from the device tree source (DTS), to load is typically handled by the bootloader. Many device manufacturers will customize the bootloader to add manufacturer-specific code for automating the task of determining which DTB file to load for that hardware. An example for U-Boot, a commonly used ...


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