Hot answers tagged

113

You can try Ctrl+Alt+* to kill the front process (Screen locking programs on Xorg 1.11) or Ctrl+Alt+F1 to open a terminal, launch a command like ps, top, or htop to see running processes and launch kill on not responding process. Note: if not installed, install htop with sudo apt-get install htop. Also, once done in your Ctrl+Alt+F1 virtual console, ...


113

If all else fails, you Raise The Elephant.  Essentially, there are special Magic SysRq key sequences (Alt+SysRq+?) that the Linux kernel handles specially. If your Linux box freezes and simply won't yield to any other key-commands, you should definitely try one particular key sequence before a hard reboot. The key sequence is popularly remembered with ...


39

For those who don't mind using keyboard shortcuts instead of the mouse scrollwheel, here they are (tested with Gnome 3.14.2): Super+Alt+8 : Toggle zoom enabled/disabled (when enabled, the next two keyboard shortcuts become active) Super+Alt++ : Zoom in (increases zoom factor by 1.0) Super+Alt+- : Zoom out (decreases zoom factor by 1.0, until it is 1.0) (...


34

In most distros pressing Ctrl+Alt+Backspace kills the X11 (graphic) interface and restarts it. Unfortunately some recent, supposedly "user friendly" distros deactivated this very useful shortcut for some unfathomable reason. I don't know if Mint is so "user friendly" but you have nothing to lose trying it :)


19

This is the correct answer to the question. Anything else would just be a hack gsettings set org.cinnamon.desktop.background picture-uri "file:///filename"


16

System Settings > Keyboard > Shortcuts > Navigation > Hide all normal windows Click the second field which says Disabled and type in a key combination of choice (e.g., Ctrl+Alt+D). System restart may be required for changes to take effect.


15

Refresh on Windows does a bunch of different things depending on the application. If you're talking about the file manager — reloading/refreshing is needed in some cases (and does the same thing as in Windows), but not that often. Most modern desktop environments on *nix make use of either the inotify facility, or, for older ones, the File Alteration ...


15

This (and much much more) can be done in advanced settings of KDE's window manager KWin. You can get to it if you right click on window titlebar and select Advanced > Special Application Settings (or Special Window Settings if you would like to apply only to specific window and not all windows of this app). Then on the Size and Position tab you can force it ...


14

To run your script by double clicking on its icon, you will need to create a .desktop file for it: [Desktop Entry] Name=My script Comment=Test hello world script Exec=/home/user/yourscript.sh Icon=/home/user/youricon.png Terminal=false Type=Application Save the above as a file on your Desktop with a .desktop extension. Change /home/user/yourscript.sh and /...


13

To answer my own question... The Gnome3 has a zoom feature in the accessibility menu. Thanks to @fheub. If you want to use shortcut key, you can edit the shortcut key in the keyboard system settings. But my point is: the zoom feature in accessibility menu is designed for people with vision problem. Has the Gnome developer ever realize everyone may want/...


12

I had a similar situation with my laptop. The screen would often remain black when it woke from suspend. My solution was to use xrandr to reset my displays. You need to find the xrandr command that sets up your layout and run that. For example, on my system, I had two screens and this set it up as I wanted it: xrandr --output DP-3 --auto --output VGA-0 -...


12

Besides what was already mentioned, I also use those tricks: If by any chance the unresponsive program was started in a terminal, I would try a Ctrl+D or Ctrl+C. If nothing happens I'd try a Ctrl+Z followed by a ruthless kill. If I knew the responsible program, I would open a terminal and use killall. (E.g., killall firefox) Alternatively, under Gnome, I ...


12

To be called UNIX you need to go through a certification process that requires (among other things) that you implement the POSIX standard. So your question is completely invalid. There is UNIX API, it's called POSIX. EDIT: Here is the list of requirements: http://www.unix.org/version4/overview.html


11

X11 and desktop environments play different roles. X11 is a display server protocol. The most common display server implementing this protocol is X.org. It combines the following main features, from the lower level upwards: video and input drivers; a canvas to draw on (taking orders like “draw a light green rectangle at these coordinates”), and input ...


10

I think you've jumped the gun a bit — while many people may agree Wayland has a better design for the modern era (though some still disagree even on that), the implementation is not yet finished, and it doesn't yet do everything needed to overtake X, nor are the applications and toolkits ready for it. This fall Wayland is expected to declare its API stable ...


10

With Linux Mint 16 (not sure about other versions) you can use gsettings to both get information about your current wallpaper as well as set it. The man gsettings is a little thin, but TAB completion will work at most steps in the following commands. Get info: gsettings get org.cinnamon.desktop.background picture-uri gsettings get org.cinnamon.desktop....


9

Adding one more possible solution to the mix, and (apart from the accepted answer) one of the least destructive of the answers so far. If you cannot: Use keyboard/mouse to A) Run the Ctrl+Alt+* option above, B) Navigate to a utility that can be used to terminate the offending program, C) Launch a terminal to initiate a pkill <process name> (or ...


9

See source at https://github.com/tobiasquinn/gnome-shell-mousewheel-zoom Install for Ubuntu: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:tobias-quinn/gsmz sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install gnome-shell-mousewheel-zoom mousewheelzoom & Done. Zoom with Alt+Mousewheel. Update 2015-03-17: Since around Cinnamon 2.2 API has changed so much that the Gnome Shell ...


9

I don't know if there is a way to do it with a GUI, but you could place a icon.face file in your user directory. That may cause issues, however. An alternative is to use the AccountsService. Edit/create the file /var/lib/AccountsService/users/<username>, and add the following lines: [User] Icon=/somewhere/pathToIcon.icon Make sure the lightdm user ...


9

It turns out that for some reason the settings for my bottom panel(taskbar) had been altered. To access the menu for the panels(top & bottom bars), I needed to hold Alt and then Right-click. This opened a little menu where I could select Add to panel... which opens another menu of things you can add to the taskbar. What I needed to add was 'Windows List',...


8

Removing the icons is the easy part. Just move all of the files in ~/Desktop to a temporary location: mkdir ~/backup_icons mv ~/Desktop/* ~/backup_icons mv ~/backup_icons/* ~/Desktop # restore Changing the background is going to be specific to your DE. I found this Ubuntu SE answer which shows that you can use the gsettings command in Gnome and Unity. ...


8

You can get to the Desktop Scaling by opening System Settings>General in the Preferences section. There is also a post on the Mint User Forums that could also prove to be useful in helping scale your display to your liking which can be found HERE. You can select Double (Hi-DPI) in General preferences as shown below:


7

Using the tool wmctrl you can get all the above information, specifically the -d switch. Example $ wmctrl -d 0 * DG: 5760x900 VP: 0,0 WA: 0,25 1440x826 Workspace 1 1 - DG: 5760x900 VP: 0,0 WA: 0,25 1440x826 2 - DG: 5760x900 VP: 0,0 WA: 0,25 1440x826 N/A 3 - DG: 5760x900 VP: 0,0 WA: 0,25 1440x826 N/A Details One line is output for each ...


7

Its actually very simple to do that. Just go to your Nautilus files preferences and click on 'Behavior' tab. Under the 'Executable Text Files' check 'Ask each time' or 'Run executable text files when they are opened'. Please look at the screenshot for reference.


7

One way or another, you would need X running. But you can get something like what you're asking with a tiling window manager. One of the earlier ones was "ion" (not as popular now). Further reading (no specific recommendations, of course: that would introduce opinion): Comparison of tiling window managers (Arch wiki) Why You Should Try a Tiling Window ...


7

Technically, all you need to run GUI programs is the X server. You can run just a terminal emulator and run all programs from that. However life without a window manager is not comfortable at all: there's no interface to switch between, raise, resize, move, hide, close, and otherwise manipulate windows. So what you need is a window manager, probably without ...


6

Just for completeness, GDB can dump process image. I didn't check that it unswaps it, but it has to---there's no other way to read the whole process memory: gdb -p $mypid followed by (gdb) gcore /tmp/myprocess-core Saved corefile /tmp/myprocess-core


6

In GNOME 3, AltF2renter refreshes the GUI. AltF2 launches the Run Command prompt, and the r command forces a refresh.


6

On laptops you might need to press CtrlFnF1 to open terminal, what I do is type reboot now to restart from terminal. To go back to the GUI from terminal on my laptop (HP G56) I have to CtrlFnF8 (apparently it could also be CtrlFnF7) and you should be back to graphical interface. Also check http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/244 Stopping & ...


6

Have a look at the HIDDEN CUSTOMIZATIONS mentioned in xfdesktop's README: If you're using the icon view, and would like to change how the text looks, you have three things you can change: the opacity (transparency) of the rounded text background, the color of the rounded text background, and the color of the text itself. You'd want to add ...


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