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I'd shut the system down, use a Windows PC with Rufus to create a LiveUSB from Xubuntu 19.10 with persistence, install Photorec on the LiveUSB, then use Photorec to recover your deleted files.


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As stated in the edits i solved my problem by running the mdadm --create command again with the correct data offset. My raid became readable again. Since i already ran the restauration on my new disk3, i was able to run the command as stated in my OP, but assuming you would be in the initial position of the failure you would run: sudo mdadm --create --...


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Edit: Not working fine. Settings of -i200Gib -s200Mib creates a 200G file, extremely fast. Obviously I have not understood the paramters, so you'd be besst to ignore everything I said below. My bad. I am going to back to the drawing board - will do some testing and update if/when I sort it out. Working fine for me. I use -i to indicate the initial position,...


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The reason is files are described in special table where is also described the blocks who "make" the file. If you get this table corrupted you do not have anymore the information where the content of the file is located. Of course there is more than one copy of this table but if your harddisk is heavy damaged you may find all of them corrupted. Also you may ...


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In Arch's wiki you can find a list of utilities for recovery data. I recommend the use of ext4magic or extundelete, which are optimized for ext. In turn, there are various tools to automate your backup like tarsnap amd restic.


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When you ran dd as the root user you bypassed all the protections that the system gives you. First, you increased your permissions from a normal user to the root account, which can do anything on the system. Second, you then used the dd utility, which cares nothing about its input or output, to write directly to your external disk. While I'm sorry to hear ...


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You will have to be more specific about the system environment, but assuming your file system is formatted as ext3 or ext4 (which should be the default in modern Linux systems -- check the output of mount), you can try a tool called extundelete. Note, however, that any action that possibly alters the file system on which these files were located must be ...


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