9

That's expected, Clonezilla does (by default) two things that make images smaller (and often faster) than you'd expect: it does not copy free space, at least on filesystems it knows about. A new laptop hopefully has most of the space free (this saves a lot of time, not just space). it compresses the image (saves space, may speed up or slow down, depending ...


7

it's like Russian dolls: disk -> MBR partition scheme -> extended partition container -> logical partition -> LUKS -> PV -> VG -> LV-> filesystem. So the root filesystem isn't simply on /dev/sda5. What you already did: enlarge disk enlarge extended partition container (/dev/sda2) enlarge partition (/dev/sda5) What's left: LUKS: no ...


6

This probably has to do with the fact that for a ready only mount (which is probably the case for a clonezilla usb key) a workdir is not needed and is left blank in the OverlayFS mount config. Thus the notice is saying that it is missing, but in this case that is nothing to worry about. You can just go ahead and clone your partition!


4

As zcat said, it isn't in gzip format. Run file on it to see if it recognizes the format. It is probably lzma, in which case you would need to use lzcat instead of zcat.


4

The cat command is not going to help much, because none of the 5 files you list matches the sda1.ext4-ptcl-img.gz.a* pattern. To get the image from sda1.ext3-ptcl-img.gz.aa you can probably do just cat sda1.ext3-ptcl-img.gz.aa | gzip -d > sda1.img Without a wildcard. AFAIK Clonezilla always "number" the files as it doesn't know up front in all cases if ...


4

Yes, just use for restore image from Clonezilla: cat sda5.ext3-ptcl-img.gz.a* | gunzip -c | partclone.restore -d -s - -o /dev/sda5


4

Your error on the eval on line 12703 on version 3.27.16 of ocs-functions is evaluating: eval $cmd where $cmd is cmd="cd "$option on line 12702 so it looks like the $option is containing a < which is interpreted by the shell as a input/output redirection. I would put an echo $option before line 12703 as this would hopefully show why eval is failing.


3

The -rescue option is meant to "Continue reading past block read errors." as per this manual. This means that it doesn't stop when it reaches a sector error. It simply ignores or bypasses them, enabling you to pull off as much data as possible. If the option isn't selected, CloneZilla will halt and throw a warning message like the one your received. ...


3

Yes, your root partition is mounted with the filesystem UUID and both, the original and the cloned one have the same UUID. To work around this, you could comment the corresponding line and mount it with the /dev/sda1 path. #UUID=20d4493c-5934-4633-998e-0c6dd970d4ad / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1 /dev/sda1 ...


3

I just had to restore a partition from one of my image backups. Steps: As my backup was to an external nfs drive, I booted of the clonezilla cd, start clonezilla select device image select nfs-server, static I configured my nfs drive to use clonezilla defaults, so I just hit enter several times, you may have to enter ip's, masks, shares, etc. ...


3

A problem that I often encountered when cloning from a physical to a virtual machine is that the initrd is often not appropriate anymore. You should boot your VM on another OS, using a livecd or whatever, then : mount your centos root partition to /mnt, and other partitions to appropriate subdirectory bind mount /dev, /sys and /proc to /mnt/dev, /mnt/sys ...


3

What you're asking for is not trivial. It's possible, I just don't know an existing implementation of the solution you need. AVFS probably won't work. There is seek-bzip ( https://github.com/cscott/seek-bzip ) and similar projects which attempt to provide random block access to bzip2 archives. Creating the table for that will take about as long as ...


3

According to: http://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live.php , "root" has no password, so you can't login into root account via ssh/scp. Use the "user" account, which has sudo privilege, with the password "live".


3

If these are your systems, you should know the password. Random people on the Internet surely don't, and even on the off chance that somebody does, what are the odds that they will post your root (system administrator account) password for the world to see? If these aren't your systems, you either need to ask whoever owns them for the password, or use an ...


3

Directly from the documentation for Clonezilla, there is even a worked example showing how it is possible to write a disk (partition) image to a file within the filesystem. Initialise Clonezilla, either from the LiveCD or as an installed application Choose "Start Clonezilla" Choose "device-image" option Choose "local_dev" option to assign sdb1 as the image ...


2

After 4 years... :) Try this: menuentry 'menuentry' { set root=(hd0,1) syslinux_source /path/isolinux/isolinux.bin syslinux_configfile /path/isolinux/isolinux.cfg }


2

One other option to suggest. fsarchiver does a good job of restoring file systems to a different size partition or even a different file system type. You could make a backup of your master fsarchiver savefs /path2storage/master.fsa /dev/sda1 /dev/sda2 /dev/sda3 The previous example uses three partitions, /boot / and /home. Partition new disk to size ...


2

The imaging error on sda6 can be avoided by ensuring source disk file checking is on. Check the FAQ: http://drbl.org/faq/fine-print.php?path=./2_System/118_fs_not_clean_mounted.faq#118_fs_not_clean_mounted.faq .


2

If you make a backup of all your partitions, you should have all data. Clonezilla will also create a backup file of your MBR and how your partition table is set up. If you have no weird copy protection system or something installed on your computer (that would save license information if supposedly free blocks for example) then the partition backup should ...


2

This guide from the Clonezilla website shows you how to do unattended runs. excerpt By modifying the boot parameters in syslinux/syslinux.cfg (for live USB) or isolinux/isolinux.cfg (for CD), you can preseed most of the options so that Clonezilla live can do the job for you with less interactive steps, or it's possible to make it run in an unattended ...


2

You can mount a Clonezilla partition image read-only using concat-fuse, ratarmount and imagemount (from the partclone-utils package) in combination to concatenate the chunks, decompress and mount the filesystem image on the fly. This method does not write anything to disk besides the index that is built to randomly access the compressed data. Generating the ...


2

You can resize the partitions with resize2fs for ext-x filesystems and ntfsresize for ntfs. dd is a good option to move to the left partitions with 10% of empty space. For example, to shrink /dev/sda1, move to the left and expand /dev/sda2: lsblk: to identify partitions and check if they are unmounted. fdisk /dev/sda or gdisk /dev/sda depending on your ...


2

I just downloaded the stable version and had the same error as you. I tried to used a previous version, it displayed the message but immediately continued. I suspect we have some incompatibility with the latest version.


2

After some playing around and testing I was able to get it working with the -j1 option in the expert settings. -j1, --dump-mbr-in-the-end Use dd to dump the MBR (total 512 bytes, i.e. 446 bytes (executable code area) + 64 bytes (table of primary partitions) + 2 bytes (MBR signature; # 0xAA55) = 512 bytes) after disk image was restored. This is an insurance ...


2

So while the answer by Thomas got me thinking along the right path, it was actually the comment on Thomas's answer by cas that solved my issue completely: Before cloning the partition, i edited /etc/default/grub, and uncommented the line that said GRUB_DISABLE_LINUX_UUID=true and ran update-grub. After cloning sda1 to sda3, Kali consistently boots into ...


2

Yes, approximately 522G, or even less; how much less depends on the data density. Yes, a 1T HD will hold both images just fine. No. No, not for practical purposes.


2

Honestly Linux lets you get away with a lot, moving between PCs with the same architecture. Always entertains me how well it works moving a system disk between machines. I wouldn't quite call that clean though. One example you might end up with is NetworkManager configurations for old network cards. I have the same feeling right now. I think it's a ...


2

In the end, I resolved this by taking a partition clone of the original machine's boot partition and installing this on the other machines with "-j1" selected from the advanced options. Slightly annoying to have the extra step, but at least restoring a clone of the boot partition only takes seconds.


2

Okay, so according to your lsblk output and your /etc/fstab, you have essentially an all-btrfs system, with the exception of the EFI system partition. Note that a single btrfs filesystem can extend beyond a single partition or even to multiple disks: since your lsblk output does not say what your /dev/sdc is being used for, it might be used as an extension ...


2

Try MX Linux (https://mxlinux.org/), which is a Debian-based yet systemd-free distro. They offer a live CD environment that you can alter based on your own needs. The MX Tools packages include an MX Live USB Maker among other remastering tools. You run the live system, do your installs, updates, removals and settings. Write it to a new USB device and voila, ...


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