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I sort-of fixed this issue, but going into advanced option, and selecting kernel 5.7.0. Then use this thread: Set Default Kernel to set as the default kernel. I have come to the assumption that 5.8.0 is buggy. Use 5.7.0 instead - that's what I'm now using.


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I think the answer they were looking for is /proc/cmdline "This file shows the parameters passed to the kernel at the time it is started. A sample /proc/cmdline file looks like the following: ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet 3 This tells us that the kernel is mounted read-only (signified by (ro)), located on the first logical volume (LogVol00)...


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I went for another solution. I don't need the exact second for boots, so I chose to use cron to log at reboot: @reboot echo "Rebooting at $(date)" >> /path/to/some/file It was inspired by the comment from @ctrl-alt-delor.


1

Getting boot time The first problem that you will get on the Pi. Is that the boot logs are created before the device gets the time from the network time server. The device has no battery backed clock, so starts at 1970-01-01T00:00 (this is also breaking who -b). The 2nd date in your and my logs look reasonable, but is the shutdown time. You will need to find ...


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Try $ who -b you'll get time of last boot.


3

I was looking into something similar in the past - changing the order of the disks and the network cards for a monolithic kernel. The order how the drivers are loaded gets decided during compilation - by initcall_levels (from lower to higher, include/linux/init.h) and then by positions in the Makefiles. I do not think there is much room for playing with ...


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According to the boot-repair output, you seem to have a harddisk or SSD (sda) with a windows-setup and an NVMe (nvme0n1) with your ubuntu-setup, correct? You choose the NVMe to delete completely and install ubuntu, but your windows is still installed on sda, probably in some defect bootloader state. Thats why you still have windows installed, even when you ...


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The only way to achieve this without udev is to change the order of the drivers the kernel loads. Since you want to use a "monolithic" kernel, this is probably not that easy. If you would have the drivers loaded as modules, you could change the order of the modules per /etc/modprobe.*, but this only helps as long as the disks need different drivers....


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Just passing through . . . but I do have some experience with multi-booting in a Mac environment, and now in Sys76 laptop . . . . Basically until you have added "windows" or in my case, "OSX" possibly the UUID location into grub, grub will show the OSX partitions but it won't boot them. And, in return, any OSX upgrades will wipe all ...


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I've had the same problem today, on my Mac (not sure which host system you're working on). The fix for me, as suggested on another forum was to downgrade to VirtualBox v5.2. Seems it has been an issue for some Mac users since last yeat.


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Try: fsck -a -v /dev/sda1 FAT filesystem breaks a lot and I hate the idea that it's used for EFI partition. It should be automatically fixed on boot by systemd service but maybe your setup is different.


2

On Ubuntu, grub.cfg is only changed whenever a new kernel is installed. Please note that some update processes run update-grub just to be on the safe side, but the resulting file will have the same contents. Most distributions offer a more fancy GRUB configuration with menu entries, additional functionality such as entering the EFI Setup or booting other ...


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Step 1: run find / -name modinfo.sh to know if the file exists or not. Step 2: if the file exists find its parent folder and copy all its content to the folder that system specify with errorr e.g /usr/lib/grub/x86 ... Step 3: run grub2-install


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Your mke2fs -n run indicates the encrypted volume /dev/mapper/luks-077248fb-b2bf-4ddb-9762-3c69af031c2c contains a LVM physical volume, not simply a filesystem. So the next steps after unlocking the encrypted volume (using cryptsetup luksOpen manually, if necessary) should be to scan for LVM components and then activate them if they are in good condition. ...


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What you are asking is effectively "how to boot SYSLINUX or EXTLINUX that has not been fully installed yet?" I would suggest (tongue-in-cheek) booting FreeDOS, using it to complete the installation of SYSLINUX/EXTLINUX, then rebooting to SYSLINUX/EXTLINUX (by chainloading its partition boot record (PBR) code from GRUB, if GRUB must still be ...


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One way to start the tomcat on the startup is to run it using cron using the @reboot attribute: open up a terminal and type : sudo crontab -e at the end of the file enter the command: @reboot PATH_TO_WHERE_TOMCAT_INSTALLED/bin/startup.sh save the file and exit. The above command will run the command once everytime computer boots up.


2

UEFI class 3 essentially means the system does not have a Compatibility Support Module (CSM) to provide legacy BIOS compatibility, so it boots in native UEFI mode only. AHCI is the currently dominant hardware programming interface standard for SATA disk controllers. Your system may have no way to select "AHCI mode" in the firmware settings (used to ...


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Press the shift key - or any other key that isn't the space bar, enter, or right arrow key, but I prefer shift or alt because they don't usually constitute an actual key command by themselves - in order to halt the automatic countdown during the grub menu. Then you can select 'advanced startup options' which is a sub-menu that lets you start in rescue mode. ...


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Now I replaced another of the same DVD, which I burned without any problems through Brasero! I do not know, maybe this problem was from that DVD or the lack of installed package...


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KMS-enabled kernels overrule any vga= setting before init completes, when modesetting is initiated, functionally making whether vga=ask works or not moot. Instead, use video= with the specific mode desired on the vttys. With video=, you're not limited to VESA modes - any mode supported by the display can be used. It's even possible sometimes with video= to ...


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It's simple. Take a look at fstab. Then mount root device and write your variable to a file on the mounted root device. I learned this from kdump.


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In this answer, let's assume I want to mount Windows Shares (CIFS) defined in /etc/fstab via mount -a -t cifs via a service script on an Ubuntu system. First, I create an entry under /etc/init.d/mountcifs with the content: #! /bin/sh ### BEGIN INIT INFO # Provides: mountcifs # Required-Start: # Required-Stop: # Default-Start: 2 3 4 5 # Default-...


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Reboot machine and go to recovery mode. select drop to root shell prompt. remount file system with below command. mount -o remount, rw / Then you can run fsck command.


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I don't have PTT Security in my BIOS Adding dis_ucode_ldr to grub helped in my case: See: https://www.dell.com/community/Precision-Mobile-Workstations/Precision-7540-will-only-boot-Linux-if-charger-is-connected/td-p/7449042/page/3


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If you want to expand LVM volumes, you generally want to use LVM to do so. Typically if you need to extend the physical volume to match the limits set in your partition table you would enter lvm and use pvresize to do so. Then to extend a logical volume, i.e. /dev/mapper/fedora-root you would use lvextend within the lvm console. Following that, as Fedora,...


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Power off computer. Power on. Wait till GRUB will show where you can choose which Linux distro you want to run. Choose the one which di not start, press e. Navigate down with the arrow-down key until you can see a line ending with: ro quiet splash $vt_handoff Using your keyboard replace the following keywords. FROM: ro quiet splash $vt_handoff TO: rw ...


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You can use an alternative tool called tuptime to get exact the same information. As example: tuptime -bits


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You can try noefi Kernel Boot Option!


6

The error message is pretty straightforward. Intel Pentium M 740 is a 32-bit instruction set processor, while your kernel requires a 64-bit processor. Linux Mint 20 (the latest) only supports 64-bit, but you can go for Linux Mint 19.3, supported until April 2023 or Linux Mint Debian Edition. Of course, one is not limited to Mint, but unfortunately dropping ...


2

I did the following to fix my error, which I got after flashing a new BIOS. Enter reboot in the prompt Goto BIOS setup Goto SATA Configuration Change to AHCI save and restart.


0

Debian is not as friendly user as Ubuntu, and if you have any issue you are not going to find as many solutions as Ubuntu. IMHO Ubuntu has by far much more users than Debian at least in non professional enviroments, but I agree that Ubuntu and Debian are very similar


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Please, spear some time to read some basics about the principal concepts: The MBR (Master Boot Record) or GPT (GUID Partition Table) are two (but not only ones) partition table types. These occupy some first bytest at the beginig of the disk and contents the information about the organisation of the whole disk. You cannot, of course, mix these types together....


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I'm not an expert, but sounds like you are mixing concepts. If you use mbr system you are using your pc bios, and if you use gpt, you must use uefi system. Mbr is a file system and gpt too. You have to select mbr or gpt in rufus according to what boot system you want to boot from. If you try to install grub on a gpt system when you choose mbr on rufus, the ...


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You could try: Filing a bug report or request support from RedHat Using a different reboot method, https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/3561.html reboot= [KNL] Format (x86 or x86_64): [w[arm] | c[old] | h[ard] | s[oft] | g[pio]] \ [[,]s[mp]#### \ ...


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If you don't want Windows on the machine whatsoever, and you've disabled RST already, choose the 'wipe disk and install Linux Mint' option in the installer.


0

I use TLP; you can edit the configuration file in order to disable bluetooth at boot, by adding this line: DEVICES_TO_DISABLE_ON_STARTUP="bluetooth"


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A couple more solutions! RFKILL rfkill was merged into the linux kernel in 2.6 and is a simple way to manage wireless devices. rfkill man page kernel.org docs For example, view wireless devices by calling rfkill with no arguments: cat@rt~ $ rfkill ID TYPE DEVICE SOFT HARD 0 wlan phy0 unblocked unblocked 1 bluetooth hci0 blocked ...


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FTR for me, it turned out that booting with an older kernel worked. brilliant, so the last upgrade to the latest kernel somehow blew my kali VM.


1

K, the solution was this, credit to @cweagans for helping me out with this! systemctl disable gdm.service yay --remove gdm yay --sync --refresh gdm systemctl enable gdm.service reboot Works!


0

Maybe grub is not installed properly. The step # grub-install /dev/sda is missed.


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If the hacker has (had) physical access to your system, you're f-ed regardless (think of hardware backdoors, changed bootloader, etc.). If you just want to protect your data from possible prying eyes, having a non-encrypted /boot will save you from a lot of unnecessary hassle. My /boot and EFI system partitions are not encrypted but everything else is.


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