New answers tagged

1

Reboot in rescue mode from OVH's management panel. Once logged in (via SSH or KVM, either works), perform the following sequence of commands Unmount your original filesystem with umount /dev/sdb*. Note that the rescue system is mounted from /dev/sda. Don't touch /dev/sda. Destroy your original filesystem and the partition it lives on with fdisk. fdisk -u ...


0

The key to solve this was strictly following the instructions about the DTB in https://github.com/dhruvvyas90/qemu-rpi-kernel#choosing-a-kernel-image Choosing a kernel image This repository contains three types of kernel images: kernel-qemu-4.*.*-buster are the most recent images, which are compatible with Raspbian Buster and Stretch. To use ...


0

I had the same issue, basically UUID's got mixed up after disabling and deleting my swap inside a virtualbox. This caused timeout issues and dependency failures, and it forced a file system check on each boot. I had to update my UUIDs accordingly. If a swap partition is deleted (e.g. on purpose when migrating from HD to SSD), the file /etc/initramfs-tools/...


1

I'd solve it in the good old-fashioned way. newfs /dev/ada1s1 mount /dev/ada1s1 /mnt cd /mnt dump -0a -f - /dev/ada0s1 | restore -rf - gpart bootcode -b /boot/mbr -p /boot/boot1 ada1 This makes a fresh filesystem, mounts it and enters the destination directory because restore needs to work there. It copies the entire file system with the classic backup ...


0

As indicated in the Rufus FAQ there are a lot of applications, typically security solutions, that can prevent software like Rufus from accessing a USB Flash Drive. Bear in mind that the list from the FAQ is far from being exhaustive. Most likely, there is an application or service on your PC that is preventing access to the USB, and you may have to find ...


1

I managed to get FreeBSD 12.1-STABLE running on my OVH VPS by taking the following steps Reboot in rescue mode from OVH's management panel. Once logged in (via SSH or KVM, either works), perform the following sequence of commands Unmount your original filesystem with umount /dev/sdb*. Note that the rescue system is mounted from /dev/sda. Don't touch /dev/...


0

The UI tool boot-repair, which can be installed from the software manager, reinstalled grub and resolved the issue using just the default settings. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair I ran boot-repair from a recovery/installation bootable USB stick, then I followed its simple instructions (took about 20 minutes). I rebooted and the LVM volume, ...


2

The way you are using the interrupt routine is correct but only in x86 mode. From Wikipedia: on a modern x86 system, BIOS calls can only be performed in Real mode, or Virtual 8086 mode. v8086 is not an option in Long mode. I believe that a modern system does not boot in real mode, so you cannot use int 10 directly. Further, EFI systems don't read boot ...


1

But dual boot is exactly what you are referring to. Dual boot means that you have two separate oses on the same hard drive , be more specific about your problems with dual boot and maybe some help will come


0

Luckily got my OS working again. Apparently a change in UUID in any partitions that is visible to the OS can lead to the OS booting into emergency mode. All I had to do was: enter blkid Take note of all the UUIDs in every partition. And now enter cat /etc/fstab. In my case the UUID of partition "nvme0n1p2" was different from what it had showed in blkid. So, ...


1

Even you did not describe any error niether a problem, I can judge it and try to advice. First of all, there is no reason for dual boot, if you have hypervisor capable CPU/motherboard, while you can run MS-Windows OS in the Virtual Machine (VM). Running Debian Linux as the host OS gives you at least two systems for virtualisation. The Linux native KVM-Qemu ...


0

You probably did not make up your mind if you want legacy BIOS (MBR) or UEFI/GPT, or both, and whether you want to install and boot another distro in the future. The idea is to tell your BIOS to directly boot into the boot loader, which would be called grub. Your BIOS settings have to be correct when you install. In my BIOS ("Visual"/intel) I have two ...


0

Find out how to enter UEFI/BIOS on your laptop, you may use this link to manufacturer to download a user's manual called User Guide, just right off the top of Tech Specs. In your UEFI/BIOS go to Boot, change order to ubuntu and you should be done.


1

I would try to redo the GRUB Installation process (if at least grub seems to load, you can skip step 3): boot from a linux live iso (e.g. debian live iso) mount your efi system partition: mount /dev/sda1 /mnt grub needs devices: mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev chroot into your debian system: chroot /mnt reinstall grub entry in firmware boot manager: grub-...


0

You can have tune2fs do a fsck on boot with the following command sudo tune2fs -c 1 /dev/mmcblk0p2 This tells the system to do a fsck every reboot on the root / device. Almost forgot to say, then reboot it should fsck /. Note this will only work on ext2/3/4 filesystems You can see last date for fsck with the following tune2fs -l /dev/mmcblk0p2 |grep -...


1

-l | --loader NAME Specify a loader (defaults to \\elilo.efi) A kernel with EFI-stub is still not a loader. To boot from BIOS it has to be an EFI-application. All the boot loaders have .EFI suffix. I think it is possible to turn a kernel into such a directly bootable object, but normally it is one of the boot loaders that gets started (with or ...


0

With the limited information you've shared thus far, I can think of two likely means to improve the situation, ideally being implemented in tandem. That particular iMac vintage was fairly memorable for its...creative...UEFI implementation, one which I've nicknamed the "Sierra Madre" as an homage to an engineering team that obviously declared "Badges? We ain’...


0

I also had grub not showing all partitions when booting with EFI, adding the parameter --modules="part_gpt part_msdos" to grub-install allowed it to show all partitions with ls and ls -l.


0

I did this by first creating a guest using e.g. virt-manager, then editing the virsh config file to boot from USB: Edit config file for the vm: # virsh edit TAILS Delete the <boot> element from the <os> element. (Leave the rest of the <os> element intact.) You can't use <boot> here, because the boot order will be specified in ...


1

Yes it is possible. Just make sure to install the bootmanager on the external disk, too. It is a standard installation procedure otherwise.


1

Thanks @Madhubala for the solution. Linux needs the controller in AHCI mode. So i've set it up from RAID to AHCI, then the CentOS installer detected the Hard Drive and I installed the OS. I expected, i won't be able to boot into Windows. To my Surprise, i'm able to boot into both OS. Dual Boot works as well.


0

Evidently the answer is yes ... I just manually removed bad kernel files and symlinks then recreated symlinks to good kernel ... and with a reboot all is well ... as per at first I see pie@peach /boot $ s total 259816 drwxr-xr-x 5 root root 4096 Mar 7 14:59 . drwxr-xr-x 28 root root 4096 Feb 10 09:40 .. -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 237656 Feb 6 17:...


0

Make sure to shutdown Windows completely and not using hybernate or suspend options, and also deselect fast boot, otherwise the disk may result in a locked state.


1

Broken/flaky USB stick? (I've got some that work fine on some machines, and aren't even acknowledged by others. Never bothered to find out why.)


1

Remove some files with sudo rm /sys/fs/pstore/dmesg-efi-*.enc.z This has been reported before. See e.g. https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=902966;msg=10 . Others simply mention sudo rm /sys/fs/pstore/*, I am not certain it is needed. At any rate, it seems that, if your system is working fine, you may get rid of the information in pstore. ...


1

First you need a backup copy in case something went wrong. You need tools for filesystem you use, whatever it is. First you need a program which will logically shrink your partition in filesystem you use. I did such thing few times before with ntfs and ext3 but idea is the same for every filesystem. I assume that your image is image of partition (sda1.img),...


0

That seems slightly masochistic to me. Personally I would have done a dd for backup. Then I would shrink it and make sure it works before trying to move it (shrink->reboot->check->final dd). I assume that you had less than 500 GB of data. But you do not know how it was structured on the disk. You have then used sfdisk and parted to modify the partitions? ...


1

As I run some tests thanks to the comments I figured out, that the problem is the fstab entry. If I comment out the fstab entry the system will boot without VGA installed. I find it quite strange, as it works when the VGA is installed. After all I may mixed up FakeRAID and SoftwareRAID, but I'm not sure. I disabled RAID in BIOS, set my HDDs to AHCI and ...


-1

This happens from time to time. My mouse does this sometimes. Pull and plug the device. It will work then, again. Windows does this, too. People there just never look into the eventmngr. The mouse just doesn't work or whatever hardware. ;) You can't prevent it. It's the electronics, not the software!


2

Let's face the facts: Debian is known to be stable and that's why I am on Debian, as well. But let's face it, it comes with serious errors from time to time and those are hard to track down. If it works with the previous Kernel, consider it a bug! Really! I had such problems now and then. Never was there a reason or it took weeks before the first bug-...


0

Since you didn't install it via any deployment method, your installation was manually. Since i didn't have to "re-install" - like Windows - since i'm on Linux, i'm not really familiar with the setup routine. IIRC there was an option for installing the X Server. But this is years ago. You might not have this option anymore. So either you selected the X ...


2

On CentOS 7 network filesystem mounts depend on network-online.target. The network-online.target is reached once an interface is up and an ip has been set. This presumes the first ip on the first interface to get up is enough for the hostname to be resoved. This is however doesn't have to be the case. We can write systemd services to test if network is ...


0

Yes you are correct. If the startup files (http in your case) are not in /etc/rc.d/init.d it shouldn't start. There can be scripts that start apps outside of systemv but normally an app would start from that folder using systemv services.


Top 50 recent answers are included