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45

This is the result of Hans de Goede’s work on flicker-free boot in Fedora. Hans developed a new Plymouth theme which takes the firmware bootsplash and adds the Fedora logo to it, until boot finishes and the desktop environment takes over. This works because bootsplash logos are now exposed as an ACPI resource, which you can see in /sys/firmware/acpi/bgrt on ...


3

Thats the new Plymouth theme. You can easily change the theme using plymouth-set-default-theme --list plymouth-set-default-theme <one from list output> - R Source: https://fedoramagazine.org/howto-change-the-plymouth-theme/


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On a very low level, the video memory is not automatically cleared when it is written to. Unless Fedora boot process explicitly clears the screen or changes the video mode, whatever it puts on screen will appear "on top" of what's already there.


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I think perhaps your init script is too minimal for booting. Kernels work with /proc and /sys so it should include : mount -t proc none /proc mount -t sysfs none /sys


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I realised what the problem was... I hadn't seen the page for USB installation so I hadn't done some important steps... In /etc/mkinitcpio.conf move the block and keyboard hooks before the autodetect hook and re-create the initial ramdisk with mkinitcpio -p linux. When installing GRUB, i forgot to add --removable which I think was the really important step....


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When I had this issue, it was caused by accidentally changing the Partition Scheme to MBR instead of GPT. Try creating the Ubuntu USB with Rufus, and make sure the Partition Scheme is set to GPT and the Target System is set to UEFI (non CSM).


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A suggested solution from https://askubuntu.com/questions/248/how-can-i-show-or-hide-boot-messages-when-ubuntu-starts... ...for just a (usually) black screen, try: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=quiet #Don't show Ubuntu bootup text GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="console=tty12" #Don't show kernel text


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There might be multiple lists: one for kernel modules loaded within initramfs (i.e. modules necessary for basic I/O and accessing the root filesystem) and another list loaded once the root filesystem has been mounted. For Debian and related Linux distributions like Ubuntu, there's /etc/initramfs-tools/modules for modules to be loaded in initramfs (in the ...


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Because it didn’t work, I tried to reinstall grub manually, but I have the same results. You've not actually said what you did here, so my suggestion might be something you've already tried. But to re-install grub manually, try the following: Boot into Linux mint Live USB and open a command prompt. Mount your Linux root partition and any partitions ...


1

I felt unhappy about the same problem on my laptop maybe longer then this question stays open. There is a solution: Disable backlight control in radeon driver by adding radeon.backlight=0 to kernel boot parameters. But. The problem here is that you might need another module to control the backlight. This means that instead of acpi_backlight=video you ...


1

Ubuntu 15.04 and forward be default uses something called systemd, which is a program (of sorts) that automates startup services and procedures. You can make your own and add it to the list of startup services with only a little bit of effort. Basic Systemd Service This is a barebones .service file that could be used to launch my python gui server (could'...


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Though it was a question 2 years ago, I still googled here. And I finally get a better solution from NFS ROOT WITH SYSTEMD [Match] Name=eth* KernelCommandLine=!nfsroot


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No need to reinstall GRUB. Since you managed to access /etc/grub.d/40_custom, use the same method to access /boot/grub/grub.cfg, find the exact same login/password details in that file, and comment them out (or just delete them). They will be between lines like: ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/40_custom ### # This file provides an easy way to add custom menu entries. ...


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I ran into this issue today but was able to fix it and save my install by following these steps: Download a live CD and boot on the affected machine. Open terminal fdisk -l and cat /etc/fstab to see what devices are mounted where mount the correct devices to the corrects parts of /mnt mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc mount --bind /sys ...


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