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6

The error message is pretty straightforward. Intel Pentium M 740 is a 32-bit instruction set processor, while your kernel requires a 64-bit processor. Linux Mint 20 (the latest) only supports 64-bit, but you can go for Linux Mint 19.3, supported until April 2023 or Linux Mint Debian Edition. Of course, one is not limited to Mint, but unfortunately dropping ...


3

I was looking into something similar in the past - changing the order of the disks and the network cards for a monolithic kernel. The order how the drivers are loaded gets decided during compilation - by initcall_levels (from lower to higher, include/linux/init.h) and then by positions in the Makefiles. I do not think there is much room for playing with ...


2

I did the following to fix my error, which I got after flashing a new BIOS. Enter reboot in the prompt Goto BIOS setup Goto SATA Configuration Change to AHCI save and restart.


2

UEFI class 3 essentially means the system does not have a Compatibility Support Module (CSM) to provide legacy BIOS compatibility, so it boots in native UEFI mode only. AHCI is the currently dominant hardware programming interface standard for SATA disk controllers. Your system may have no way to select "AHCI mode" in the firmware settings (used to ...


2

On Ubuntu, grub.cfg is only changed whenever a new kernel is installed. Please note that some update processes run update-grub just to be on the safe side, but the resulting file will have the same contents. Most distributions offer a more fancy GRUB configuration with menu entries, additional functionality such as entering the EFI Setup or booting other ...


1

Getting boot time The first problem that you will get on the Pi. Is that the boot logs are created before the device gets the time from the network time server. The device has no battery backed clock, so starts at 1970-01-01T00:00 (this is also breaking who -b). The 2nd date in your and my logs look reasonable, but is the shutdown time. You will need to find ...


1

The only way to achieve this without udev is to change the order of the drivers the kernel loads. Since you want to use a "monolithic" kernel, this is probably not that easy. If you would have the drivers loaded as modules, you could change the order of the modules per /etc/modprobe.*, but this only helps as long as the disks need different drivers....


1

Your mke2fs -n run indicates the encrypted volume /dev/mapper/luks-077248fb-b2bf-4ddb-9762-3c69af031c2c contains a LVM physical volume, not simply a filesystem. So the next steps after unlocking the encrypted volume (using cryptsetup luksOpen manually, if necessary) should be to scan for LVM components and then activate them if they are in good condition. ...


1

Press the shift key - or any other key that isn't the space bar, enter, or right arrow key, but I prefer shift or alt because they don't usually constitute an actual key command by themselves - in order to halt the automatic countdown during the grub menu. Then you can select 'advanced startup options' which is a sub-menu that lets you start in rescue mode. ...


1

K, the solution was this, credit to @cweagans for helping me out with this! systemctl disable gdm.service yay --remove gdm yay --sync --refresh gdm systemctl enable gdm.service reboot Works!


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I don't have PTT Security in my BIOS Adding dis_ucode_ldr to grub helped in my case: See: https://www.dell.com/community/Precision-Mobile-Workstations/Precision-7540-will-only-boot-Linux-if-charger-is-connected/td-p/7449042/page/3


1

KMS-enabled kernels overrule any vga= setting before init completes, when modesetting is initiated, functionally making whether vga=ask works or not moot. Instead, use video= with the specific mode desired on the vttys. With video=, you're not limited to VESA modes - any mode supported by the display can be used. It's even possible sometimes with video= to ...


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