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If you cannot login to the system normally, you could use the boot option systemd.unit=multi-user.target to override the default of graphical.target. If you can login to the system and have root access, you could use systemctl isolate multi-user.target to switch the system immediately to non-GUI mode, or systemctl set-default multi-user.target to set it as ...


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What you want to delete in your boot menu is some stray boot manager entries. From the efibootmgr man page: efibootmgr is a userspace application used to modify the UEFI Boot Manager. This application can create and destroy boot entries, change the boot order, change the next running boot option, and more. From the UEFI Shell there is the bcfg command. ...


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So... After everything i booted into windows and saw something, that's when it clicked me. Basically, when i saw windows was booting perfectly and grub was delaying, it implied that my HDD and BIOS were absolutely fine. Also my GRUB was fine too because i literally installed another OS with new grub and all. The fault lied in my boot order. My CD/DVD ...


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If I recall correctly, anything you type after on the boot: line after the name of the LILO boot option you want gets appended to the kernel command line. For example, since your LILO boot label is Linux, the classic way to boot into single user mode would be: boot: Linux single Unfortunately you cannot view or change the existing kernel command line ...


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The Kubuntu install with ubuquity -b installed legacy grub packages: grub-pc grub-pc-bin grub-gfxpayload-lists Uninstall those packages then install the grub efi packages for your system, e.g. for my 64bit x86: grub-efi-amd64 grub-efi-amd64-bin grub-efi-amd64-signed The installation of these packages runs grub-install and updates the files in /boot/efi/...


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It seems that the official FreeDOS images (as of this writing) were not meant to be used as "live CDs" but rather as installation media. So to make a bootable media for your purposes you could modify one of the official FreeDOS installer images. However, you maybe restricted by the size of the media you choose especially when using floppy images. In this ...


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When you power on or reset a x86-based Linux system, you'll usually first see the system manufacturer's logo, and/or some other messages from the system firmware. After that, the Linux bootloader will display its boot menu or logo. (It might be the logo of the Linux distribution in question.) On a x86-based Linux system, this is usually GRUB, but other ...


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If you have more than one OS, it's probably because of that. Try adding these lines into your GRUB file and updating GRUB. GRUB_RECORDFAIL_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_DISABLE_OS_PROBER=true It worked for me. For reasons of adding these lines check out my post here.


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