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First off, MBR (Legacy) is becoming less common these days and is gradually being replaced with EFI. As your question doesn't explicitly say you know you are using legacy boot and not EFI, I'll suggest you check which you are actually using. To do this boot into your working (main) Debian system and look for: ls /sys/firmware/efi/efivars/ If this exists ...


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When you power on or reset a x86-based Linux system, you'll usually first see the system manufacturer's logo, and/or some other messages from the system firmware. After that, the Linux bootloader will display its boot menu or logo. (It might be the logo of the Linux distribution in question.) On a x86-based Linux system, this is usually GRUB, but other ...


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The BIOS can't choose an OS to boot from; you must replace GRUB with another boot manager when you have multiple operating systems. Some choices are: BURG GRUB2 aka GRUB (provided for reference) LILO (development stopped in late 2015, problematic with GT, RAID, and BTFS) ReFIND (themable, EFI/UEFI only, no MBR/BIOS support) Syslinux systemd-...


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Install os-prober in the main distro, arch-linux will be detected automatically and added to grub.cfg after update-grub. Or write the configuration to /etc/grub.d/40_custom: menuentry "Arch Linux Custom" { set root=(hd0,gpt9) linux /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/sda9 initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img } Then run update-grub


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