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12

The artist Lisa Haney has provided an explanation on her blog. [Click through because the back cover has more...] Some of the more colourful include: 6 Bash and Perl & Shell 9 The Linux penguin forcing the Windows gorilla to walk the plank 11 Evi Nemeth makes gesture


8

Introduction to Operating Systems abstractions using Plan9 from Bell Labs might be of your interest.


7

Absolutely. I find it useful for learning key concepts in Unix that may not be that obvious when you're first starting out. shells man pages pipes sed/awk Perl/Python When first starting out with Unix most of these are pretty foreign and a book like this is invaluable. I've had mine since the 2nd edition and it's pretty worn out at this point. The 3rd ...


5

There is "The Design and Implementation of FreeBSD" 2004 Edition: http://smile.amazon.com/Design-Implementation-FreeBSD-Operating-System/dp/0201702452/ 2014 Edition (will be released in September): http://smile.amazon.com/Design-Implementation-FreeBSD-Operating-Edition/dp/0321968972/ The classic 1996 edition is also available for free on the FreeBSD ...


5

cat-v has a Plan 9 doc archive that contains a number of papers, manual pages for various editions and other interesting miscellanea.


5

I have a general rule of thumb when buying any tech book, avoid the ones that weigh more than a phonebook (remember those? ;)). Avoid any book for dummies, unless you think you are a dummy, avoid any listed as a "Bible". The big fat books are a marketing ploy with tons of white space, large font, and excessive examples. I'm sorry I can't answer your ...


5

IPv6, a cloud looming over the horizon. At the time, IPv6 was a scary beast whose widespread adoption was thought to be in the near future. Now, IPv6 is a scary beast whose widespread adoption is thought to be in the near future. While this may look like a penguin from afar, I believe this is Duke, the mascot of Java. Windows Vista, not part of the scenery ...


2

The Design of the UNIX Operating System by Maurice J. Bach -classic book describes the internal algorithms and the structures that form the basis of the UNIX ®operating system and their relationship to the programmer interface


2

I'll bite on the first three, front row and center. 1) Web Spider (probably a rogue one that doesn't respect robots.txt, got caught stealing server resources and so has been locked out) 2) Daemon (any background server process) 3) Finger Daemon (an early rudimentary identification server that allowed you to query it to find out about people on the system) ...


2

Without delving into details of applications running on the system which is where normally performance tuning would start you can start looking at system performance through: https://access.redhat.com/knowledge/docs/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Performance_Tuning_Guide/index.html http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/REDP4285.html http://www....


2

"Understanding the Linux Kernel" by "Daniel P. Bovet, Marco Cesati" could be what you are looking for.


2

How about Linux Kernel in a Nutshell by Greg Kroah-Hartman? Also worth having a look at Linux Kernel Newbies : Documents.


1

Which book(s) you choose will depend on which distribution(s) you choose. There are some good general references, but a distribution and version specific one will always have more detail. My personal favorite is the Debian Administrator's Handbook - available in multiple formats free, or paid-for print version - https://debian-handbook.info/


1

There is a lot of books, but often books tend to be outdated. There is great RedHat Guide. I think you can start from that. If you want to theory look at UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook, but like I said, I might be outdated. And of course install any Linux distro, and use it.


1

Linux Kernel Development Third Edition by Robert Love is a good book ! Linux From Scratch Version 7.4 Created by Gerard Beekmans Edited by Matthew Burgess and Bruce Dubbs, This package provides an arbitrary precision numeric processing language. It satisfies a requirement needed when building the Linux kernel. and contains programs needed to administer ...


1

There are some official documentation available from FreeBSD: FreeBSD Handbook: which is more about the system and its administration FreeBSD Developer's Handbook: a more recent addition targeting system development I think you would find some answers in the later, but development mailing list and forum are still a way to get information as all might not ...


1

It had some neat tricks that are still relevant. Having said that, I have been learning a lot just looking at the questions and answers on this forum and Stack Overflow.


1

If you're happy working through online tutorials I would reccomend looking at the Linode documentation library. You don't need to have a Linode server to make use of their articles and they cover a wide range of subjects. http://library.linode.com/ If you're craving some structure to your learning process then I suggest you use the RHCSA exam objectives to ...


1

Unless you are particularly interested in *nix kernel implementations of the TCP/IP stack I would recomend that you take a look at lwIP implementation. The implementation is small enough to grasp without that much problem, and it pretty well documented. Take a look at the Rx flowchart and the wikia web site.


1

There's a significant difference between TCP/IP, the protocol specification and various implementations. If you want the authoritative source, there's nothing better than the RFC. If you want details about Linux's TCP/IP implementation try TCP/IP & Linux Protocol Implementation, or read the source code. If you want general information about the TCP/IP ...


1

The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System chapters 12 (Network Communication) and 13 (Network Protocols).


1

Check "Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment (2nd Edition)" and also http://www.openbsd.org/books.html#5


1

For shell I strongly recommend Portable Shell Programming and Portable Shell Scripting. The first gets you started quickly; it's concise with excellent examples. The second delves much more deeply into the intricacies of the shell; why things work the way they do. Although both are focused on POSIX shell they'll give you a solid grounding for any shell ...


1

I would suggest combination of Unix Power Tools and Learning the bash Shell First book will teach you how to work efficiently, elegantly, and creatively with the Unix tool suite and second book will teach you shell scripting in bash which is the most common shell used by Linux distributions.


1

You can read into the book called, Linux System Programming on Google Books . It's a really good book, I can recommend.


1

May I suggest the following two books as well (besides the others): Linux Programming Interface Linux System Programming I have referred the first one extensively (If i had better memory, and had more time, I would know a lot more than I do now; but that's another story). I am currently reading the second one.


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