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catalina.sh is in the systemd House of Horror, and the things that apply to systemd today have applied to the IBM System Resource Controller for 30 years. I actually quote an IBM Redbook on one of my Frequently Given Answers, where it was telling people the correct way to write dæmons to run under the SRC, that applies just as much to other systems, ...


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The System Resource Controller is showing the correct status, so far as it's concerned -- the PID that it started has now exited. My best suggestion for getting SRC to indicate your expected status would be to ensure that the chain of scripts exec's each subsequent one, so that the tail-end java process occupies the same PID that the initial script did. ...


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The System Resource Controller (SRC) system does not store any logs on its own. If your script produced any stdout, it will be directed to /dev/console unless you direct it otherwise with the -o option. Since you did not provide a -o option when you ran mkssys, you could run alog -f /var/adm/ras/conslog -o to see if your script produced any such output. ...


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I have init.d script Don't start from there, especially if it came from a non-AIX system. This is almost certainly rubbish that will lead you up the garden path. Just plonking an rc script under the service manager is a sin that people commit on Linux operating systems using systemd, but it has been a sin for a long time, especially on AIX, which has had ...


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j=`awk '/331881/{print NR}' file` awk -v j="$j" '{a[++i]=$0}/331881/{for(x=NR-j;x<NR;x++)print a[x]}' file output -rw-rw---- 1 informix informix 9117025 Jan 21 05:22 shop4_0_Log0000331875.Z -rw-rw---- 1 informix informix 8897981 Jan 21 05:24 shop4_0_Log0000331876.Z -rw-rw---- 1 informix informix 9325351 Jan 21 05:31 ...


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Assuming that you are located in the directory that holds the listed files, using zsh: ls -ld shop4_0_Log<331882->.Z The <331882-> is a zsh-specific glob that matches integers that are 331882 or larger. With some other shell: for name in shop4_0_Log*.Z; do number=${name#shop4_0_Log} number=${number%.Z} if [ "$number" -ge 331882 ];...


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Another good tool would be sed: sed -n '/shop4_0_Log0000331881\.Z$/q;p' test.out


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I think you can just use awk directly: awk '/331881/ { exit } 1' test.out This will print all lines, but for a line matching 331881, quit.


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Try removing the and condition, remove the following code from your one liner: && NR>=%-1


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If your socket is of address family AF_INET, then it is tcp4 in netstat netstat: tcp4 0 0 *.57312 *.* LISTEN If your socket is of address family AF_INET6, then it depends on IPV6_V6ONLY option: int v6only= 0; setsockopt (s, IPPROTO_IPV6, IPV6_V6ONLY, &ipv6only, sizeof ipv6only); netstat: tcp 0 ...


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The current version of OpenSSH's sshd, which is typically ahead of the OpenSSH version provided in AIX, does not support the SyslogFacility directive in a Match block, just as it says. The sshd documentation says, for the Match directive: Only a subset of keywords may be used on the lines following a Match keyword. Available keywords are AcceptEnv, ...


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There is a difference between compression of files and archiving of files. Compression is the reduction of volume of a file. Archiving is storing of one of multiple files in an archive file with or without compression. A file with extention '.gz' is a compressed file. So your task sounds incorrect. But in *nix environments we often use compression of a ...


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If you install GNU iconv package, the following command will work: /opt/freeware/bin/iconv -f utf-16be -t utf-8 Otherwise try this: /usr/bin/iconv -f ucs-2 -t utf-8


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The question has been answered in another post. Here Thank you everyone for the help and support


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