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A chroot on Unix operating systems is an operation that changes the apparent root directory for the current running process and its children. A program that is run in such a modified environment cannot name (and therefore normally not access) files outside the designated directory tree.

8
votes
A process is run with a uid ang a gid. Both have permissions assigned to them. You could call chroot with a userspec of a user and group, where actually the user is not in that group. The process … execte the cat process in the context of the user user AND the group root. Now, the cat process has the necessary permissions: root@host:~$ chroot --userspec user:root / sh -c "cat file" file …
modified May 29 '15 by chaos
3
votes
The problem is /bin/ls don't just need the shared libraries, which you provided. It also needs the program that loads them; the linux loader. To solve your problem you can copy the loader from your system (usually /lib/ld-linux.so.2) to the location of your chroot (/mnt/foo/lib/ld-linux.so.2). …
modified Jul 23 '14 by chaos