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Watching updates at the end of a file, with or without the tail utility

10
votes
old file and create a new one. tail -f will still be connected to the deleted file, so it won't show anything new. …
answered Aug 15 '11 by Stéphane Gimenez
6
votes
On my linux system (GNU coreutils 8.12), I was able to check (using strace) that tail -f¹ uses the lseek system call to skip over most of the file quickly: lseek(3, 0, SEEK_CUR …
answered Sep 8 '11 by Stéphane Gimenez
1
vote
are not present in the original file, you'll have to add them. This is an example of how to do it: tail -f production.log | grep -e … | sed 's/\(^Processing \)/\n\1/' Edit: if you want an empty …
answered Aug 3 '11 by Stéphane Gimenez
55
votes
You can use this to strip the first two lines: tail -n +3 foo.txt and this to strip the last two lines: head -n -2 foo.txt (assuming the file ends with \n for the latter) Just like for the … standard usage of tail and head these operations are not destructive. Use >out.txt if you want to redirect the output to some new file: tail -n +3 foo.txt >out.txt In the case out.txt already exists …
answered Aug 16 '11 by Stéphane Gimenez