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The action of modifying a program's behavior, generally by modifying a text file.

6
votes
Lynx does the standard thing (unlike Firefox and Chrome) and uses the system's mailcap database. The system mailcap is in /etc/mailcap, and the per-user file is ~/.mailcap. Add entries like applicati …
answered Feb 10 '13 by Gilles
0
votes
That's easy: don't log in as root. You don't need configuration files in the root account because you shouldn't be running programs as root. (And the fact that you shouldn't be doing this explains … aptitude. (This isn't necessary though: you can always launch aptitude directly and then use its “become root” command.) Just run these programs with sudo; under the Debian configuration, this preserves …
answered Mar 27 '16 by Gilles
6
votes
Short answer: just pick nroff. Nroff is the traditional word processor for manual pages. “Catman” pages are usually manual pages that have been formatted by nroff for use on a text terminal. Catman p …
answered Nov 12 '10 by Gilles
5
votes
Most of the differences between two installations of the same distribution will be in /etc. Copy the contents of /etc from one machine to a temporary directory on the other and run diff -ru /etc /cop …
answered May 21 '11 by Gilles
3
votes
The traditional place to define an environment variable system-wide is /etc/profile. This file is read by Bourne-style shells (including bash, ksh, ash) when you log in for a text-mode session, either …
answered Aug 6 '11 by Gilles
27
votes
The wizard is provided by the function zsh-newuser-install. To run it again, make a backup of your .zshrc (because there's a small risk that zsh-newuser-install will mess up your manual configuration), then run autoload -U zsh-newuser-install zsh-newuser-install -f …
answered Jan 7 '14 by Gilles
10
votes
No, but it's not useful in this case. You can have multiple AcceptEnv, AllowGroups, AllowUsers, DenyGroups, DenyUsers, HostKey, PermitOpen, Port and Subsystem lines, and each line adds one or more (or …
answered Sep 14 '10 by Gilles
1
vote
When you supply an xorg.conf file, this is the complete configuration. You can't just add one option, you have to supply all mandatory parts, including declaring the input and output peripherals … . It's common for programs to start with sensible options and allow them to be overridden by a configuration file, but in the case of Xorg, supplying a configuration file erases the default options …
answered Jul 15 '16 by Gilles
2
votes
There's nothing built into bash. You could tell it to maybe reload .bashrc each time it displays a prompt, through PROMPT_COMMAND. ## Create a timestamp file, dated like the .bashrc that was read. ## …
answered Jun 18 '11 by Gilles
10
votes
between machines is always a bit of a pain. If the configuration language allows conditionals, use them. Otherwise, if there is an include mechanism, use it to split the configuration file into a … a GUI configuration interface. Avoid configuring things in /etc, it's harder to synchronize between machines. …
answered Sep 5 '10 by Gilles
1
vote
I don't think you can save settings of a running Xterm to a file. Xterm settings are specified via X resources. Each of the entries in the menu corresponds to a resource. The manual lists the availabl …
answered Apr 5 '12 by Gilles
4
votes
The buffer name is in the mode-line-buffer-id face, applied above the mode-line face. By default, on a dark background in a terminal, mode-line is in black on white and mode-line-buffer-id is bold; ma …
answered Aug 3 '11 by Gilles
5
votes
You can use GOTO in a rule to skip to a label as soon as the rule has been applied. If the label is at the very end of the rules, then all subsequent rules are skipped. So in 30.myusb.rules: ACTION= …
answered May 19 '14 by Gilles
1
vote
pages are located, e.g. grep -F .bashrc /usr/man/man1/*.1 If you want to find which program accesses that configuration file, you can set up a monitoring system. You can use LoggedFS to monitor all …
answered Dec 14 '14 by Gilles
2
votes
If it's acceptable for you, you can set a library search path when compiling (more precisely, when linking). Pass the -rpath option to ld, or tell the compiler to do so, e.g. gcc -Wl,-rpath,/usr/loca …
answered Jan 10 '11 by Gilles

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