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The command-line is the interactive interface to your shell.

2
votes
cpufreq-info - Utility to retrieve cpufreq kernel information. It will list available frequency steps, available governors, current policy etc. cpufreq-set - A tool which allows to modify cpufreq set …
answered Oct 18 '14 by jimmij
2
votes
Single grep with -Perl compatible option: grep -Pc '^([^\|]*\|){12}\K1' file
answered Dec 31 '15 by jimmij
0
votes
Your problem is not with Jul, but with /, so remove them using for example parameter substitution mechanism: echo "Please enter the date: " read X a=$(date --date="${X//\//-}" '+%d-%b-%y') echo "$a" …
answered Aug 14 '15 by jimmij
7
votes
One way with sed: sed ':X;s/\(.\)\1/\1/g;tX' or even simpler: sed 's/\(.\)\1*/\1/g' (thanks Costas and mikeserv for comments).
answered Feb 26 '15 by jimmij
3
votes
You can run bash inside find with -exec option and run file inside shell, e.g.: find . -type f -execdir bash -c 'file "$0" | grep -q Matroska && rm "$0"' {} \;
answered Aug 18 '15 by jimmij
7
votes
You need to escape the braces: grep 't\{2\}' textfile Otherwise { and } are treated as literal characters.
answered Feb 14 '15 by jimmij
3
votes
I would suggest to use perl: perl -p0e 's/(.*\n)(.*\n)(.*Fail\n)/#\1#\2#\3#/g' file Here is how it works: -p: print program in the loop over all input lines -0: assume null as record separator -e …
answered Aug 25 '15 by jimmij
1
vote
Should be easy with awk: $ awk -F'[";]' -vOFS='' '{for(i=2;i<NF;i++)print $1,$i}' file 1234,a 1234,b 1234,d 2345,e 2345,f 2345,g 2345,h
answered Mar 9 '15 by jimmij
2
votes
With find + grep: find . -name '*.txt' -exec sh -c 'grep -HPo "frames=\K.*" "$0" | tail -n1' {} \; And with shell for loop + grep in similar fashion: for file in *.txt; do grep -HPo 'frames=\K.*' …
answered Jan 11 '15 by jimmij
6
votes
The glob * can be used to match not only plain files, but also directories, so the command you are looking for is mv ./*/*.avi .
answered Aug 28 '15 by jimmij
0
votes
Since you tagged your question with zsh I assume we are talking about this shell. Most probably you have set (either directly or indirectly with some external script like oh-my-zsh) the variables CHA …
answered Jan 25 '15 by jimmij
3
votes
You need only single separator between commands: ; or & or && etc, so try emacs & emacs & If you run emacs &; emacs & then you start emacs in the background, and then run ; without any command so b …
answered Sep 13 '18 by jimmij
7
votes
You can select particular word from last typed command with !!: and a word designator. As a word designator you need 0. You may find ^ and $ useful too. From man bash: Word Designators 0 (zer …
answered Jan 19 '15 by jimmij
3
votes
Here's awk solution: awk -F, -v OFS=, 'l{print l}{l=$0}END{$1+=1.25;print}' file The idea is to print previous line instead of the current one. -F, and -v OFS=, set the input and output field sep …
answered Jan 8 '18 by jimmij
0
votes
Just add another expression to sed after ;, eg: sed 's/^\(.*\).png/\1\/\1,/g;s,/\(.*\)_,/\1,' But keep in mind that parsing ls command is not a good habit.
answered Jan 20 '15 by jimmij

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