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1
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There's likely another process that's running that's blocking it or there's a file that's blocking it, such as a lock file. In a terminal you can try launching it manually to see what's up. $ gnome- …
answered Aug 5 '18 by slm
3
votes
, application software and data storage) operates. Due to this focus, utilities are often rather technical and targeted at people with an advanced level of computer knowledge - in contrast to application software …
answered Mar 28 '14 by slm
1
vote
You can find out what's going on behind the scenes of an application by using the tool strace. Simply invoke the tool in question like so: $ strace <app> Be warned there will be a lot of output …
answered Nov 13 '13 by slm
1
vote
Unfortunately these are your options: User's home directory /etc Some other designated location on the system There is no magical place you can save your data where it will be impervious to a pote …
answered Oct 8 '14 by slm
5
votes
Many questions. Let's take a couple and see if we can't clear things up. Q1 I understand that the equivalent services are in /etc/init where the services start/stop. But I assume that if I in …
answered Feb 4 '14 by slm
1
vote
lastcomm (part of psacct, it has several tools in the suite) to find out when a given application was used by user X. Example $ lastcomm rm rm S root pts/0 0.00 secs Tue …
answered Jun 2 '14 by slm