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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 4778

Manipulating files: copying, renaming, searching, analyzing, archiving, etc. For operating on text in a file, see /text-processing. For questions about the Files file manager (formerly Nautilus), see /nautilus.

2
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The files with the -> are symbolic links, see also the l at the start of the mode. When you copy them, by default it copies what they point to. If the file that they point to does not exist, then you will get an error. …
answered Mar 3 by ctrl-alt-delor
4
votes
It is done similar to MS-Windows. It is not done by OS. It is done by file manager, a part of the windowing system. Usually the part of the file-name after the last dot . is used to make the decision …
answered Aug 7 '14 by ctrl-alt-delor
2
votes
If you are in the child then: Using bash shell, shopt -s dotglob mv -t .. * rmdir $(pwd) If your mv does not have -t then: shopt -s dotglob mv * .. rmdir $(pwd)
answered Feb 24 '15 by ctrl-alt-delor
1
vote
Yes all open file IDs are copied to the child, when you fork. See man fork The child inherits copies of the parent's set of open file descriptors. Each file descriptor in the child refers to the …
answered Dec 10 '18 by ctrl-alt-delor
3
votes
What you are describing is fuse. User mode file-systems. They look like file-systems but have custom internals. Some existing ones are: sshfs file-system over ssh. tar / zip fs mount a tar / zip f …
answered Apr 18 by ctrl-alt-delor
2
votes
Ask find to find files within /lag/cnn to a maximum depth of 3 of at least so many minutes old. Then using xargs pass them to tar (to zip it). This works with gnu tools: find /lag/cnn -maxdepth 3 …
answered Dec 19 '13 by ctrl-alt-delor
0
votes
You can come in and out of quotations. E.g. to remove A file starting with *, then do rm "*"* Practice with echo first echo "*"*
answered Jun 25 '18 by ctrl-alt-delor
1
vote
The examples are not the same as in the title. For the question in the title. The version with cat will be marginally slower. For the question in the body The first command, is writing two files
answered Jul 28 '18 by ctrl-alt-delor
5
votes
deleting files. I assume that nfs is the same, when I used it 20 years ago it was. from: http://netbsd.gw.com/cgi-bin/man-cgi?sticky+7+NetBSD-current Later, on SunOS 4, the sticky bit got an … additional meaning for files that had the bit set and were not executable: read and write operations from and to those files would go directly to the disk and bypass the buffer cache. This was …
answered Nov 20 '13 by ctrl-alt-delor
5
votes
If you statement is true “there are no .B files without .A files.”, then get a list of .B files and remove the extension. find $directory-to-search -name "*.B" | sed -r -e "s~(.*)\.B~\1~g" …
answered Jun 16 '14 by ctrl-alt-delor
0
votes
system fail (e.g. power outage), then you would ether have done nothing (not started); have 2 files: old and new; or succeeded. However this is not the case, unless you do what it says fsync. They are …
answered Jul 22 '16 by ctrl-alt-delor
2
votes
This will put the directory on the home partition. #do this as root mv /srv/media /home; ln -s /home/media /srv You may want to consider looking at disk quotas at well.
answered May 27 '14 by ctrl-alt-delor
1
vote
If you are doing forensics (to late to plan for things to be recorded better), then Use find to find files that were changed after a certain time. find «directory_name» -newerct "1 hour ago" This …
answered May 28 '17 by ctrl-alt-delor
0
votes
process. Navigate into /proc/«pid»/fd. Identify the file-descriptor (a number: 0 is stdin, 1 stdout, 2 stderr, other numbers for other files) for the file that you are looking for. Copy the file from …
answered Jul 6 '16 by ctrl-alt-delor
0
votes
chmod is not enough, as user can just change the mode. First stop the user from editing the file: chmod go-w «the-file-name» chown «some-other-user» «the-file-name» Now the user could still delet …
answered Dec 23 '18 by ctrl-alt-delor

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